Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 1776 AD or search for 1776 AD in all documents.

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ashington was chosen its commander-in-chief and took command at Cambridge, Mass., on the 2d of July, 1775. The Virginia people again met in convention on the 17th of July, 1775, and chose a committee of safety to take charge of the affairs of the colony, ordered the enlistment of troops, passed laws for the raising of money, the procuring of arms and military supplies, and for the conducting of elections by loyal voters. The story of the revolution need not be repeated. Virginia's Washington, after seven long years of arduous struggle and endurance, brought it to a successful termination, at her Yorktown, in 1781. But it is well to recall that it was Virginia, the most conservative of the colonies, which in the convention of 1776, on the 6th of May, instructed her delegates in Congress to propose to declare the United Colonies free and independent States; and that this resulted in a Declaration of Independence, on the 4th of July, 1776, which was drawn by her Thomas Jefferson.
erate States, was born in Clarke county, Va., in 1807. The worthy Virginia family to which he belongs is descended from John Page, an immigrant from England in early days, one of whose descendants, John Page, wedded Jane Byrd of Westover. Their son, Mann Page, was father to William Byrd Page, born at North End, Gloucester county, in 1768, who was a farmer by occupation, and died at Fairfield, Clarke county, in 1812. He married Ann Lee, who was born at Leesylvania, Prince William county, in 1776, and died at Washington, D. C. She was a daughter of Henry Lee, and sister of Gen. Henry Lee, the famous cavalry officer, known as Light Horse Harry, father of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Another brother, Charles Lee, was attorney-general of the United States in Washington's administration. Richard L. Page, son of William Byrd and Ann Page, became a midshipman in the United States navy March 12, 1824, being first assigned to the sloop-of-war John Adams, of the West Indies squadron, Commodore Porter