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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 58 58 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 30 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 24 24 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 19 19 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 12 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1777 AD or search for 1777 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 241 results in 204 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
he Quakers, or Society of Friends, had, since 1760, made slave-holding and slave-trading a matter of church discipline. The War for Independence, and the adoption of the Constitution, in 1787, which included the compromise resolution that provided for the continuation of the slave-trade, by permission, until 1808, caused very little change in the sentiment of the people, and all hoped that in some way, not yet imagined, the gradual and peaceful abolition of slavery would be accomplished. In 1777, Vermont, not yet admitted to the Union, formed a State constitution abolishing slavery. Like constitutions were adopted by Massachusetts, including Maine, in 1780, and by New Hampshire in 1783. Gradual abolition was secured by statute in Pennsylvania in 1780, in Rhode Island and Connecticut in 1784, in New York in 1799, and in New Jersey in 1804. Abolition of slavery in the Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi, including the present States of Ohio, Indiana, I
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acland, John Dyke, 1750- (search)
Acland, John Dyke, 1750- Military officer; Maj. John Dyke Acland. was with Burgoyne in his invasion of northern New York in 1777, and at the Christina Harriet Acland. same time he was a member of Parliament. In the battle of Saratoga (Oct. 7, 1777) he was severely wounded — shot through the legs — and made a prisoner. Taken to the American headquarters on Bemis's Heights, his devoted wife, Lady Harriet, was permitted to pass through the lines and attend him. She was kindly received 1777) he was severely wounded — shot through the legs — and made a prisoner. Taken to the American headquarters on Bemis's Heights, his devoted wife, Lady Harriet, was permitted to pass through the lines and attend him. She was kindly received and treated by the American officers, and their bearing towards their wounded prisoners excited the major's gratitude and warm esteem. After his return to England he was provoked to give the lie direct to Lieutenant Lloyd, at a dinner-party, because the latter cast aspersions upon the Americans. A duel ensued on Bampton Downs. The major was unhurt, but a severe cold, which he contracted at the time of the duel, culminated in a fever which caused his death at his seat at Pixton, Somersetshire
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
in the case of the Boston massacre (see Boston), and in the same year (1770) he was elected to a seat in the General Court. From that time John Adams was a leader among the patriots in Massachusetts. He was a delegate to the first Continental Congress (1774), where he took a leading part. Returning. he was elected a member of the Provincial Congress. He was an efficient speaker and most useful committee-man in the Continental Congress until he was appointed commissioner to France late in 1777, to supersede Deane. He advocated. helped to frame, voted for, and signed the Declaration of Independence. and he was a most efficient member of the Board of War from June, 1776, until December, 1777. He reached Paris April 8, 1778. where he found a feud between Franklin and Lee, two other commissioners. He advised intrusting that mission to one commissioner, and Franklin was made sole ambassador. He was appointed minister (1779) to treat with Great Britain for peace. and sailed for F
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agnew, James, (search)
Agnew, James, A British general; came to America late in 1775; participated in the military movements in and about Boston: and was engaged in the battle of Long Island, where, and in subsequent campaigns, he commanded the 4th Brigade of the royal army. He accompanied ex-Governor Tryon in his marauding expedition to Danbury, Conn., in the spring of 1777. He was slightly wounded in the battle of Brandywine (Sept. 11), and in the battle of Germantown (Oct. 4, 1777) he was killed.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aitken, Robert, 1734-1802 (search)
Aitken, Robert, 1734-1802 Publisher; born in Scotland in 1734; arrived in Philadelphia in 1769; was a practical printer, and published the Pennsylvania magazine, or American monthly Museum, from January, 1775, to June, 1776. He was a warm Whig, and was thrown into prison after the British took possession of Philadelphia, late in 1777. He very narrowly escaped the horrors of a British prison-ship in New York. He issued the first American edition of the Bible in 1782, by which he lost considerable money. He is supposed to have been the author of a paper entitled An inquiry concerning the principles of a commercial system for the United States. He died in Philadelphia in July, 1802.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, William, 1726-1783 (search)
erwards known in America. When the quarrel with Great Britain began in the colonies Lord Stirling espoused the cause of the patriots. In 1775 he was appointed a colonel, and in March, 1776, was commissioned a brigadier-general in the Continental army. When General Lee went South, Lord Stirling was placed in command of the troops in and around the city of New York. After conspicuous service in the battle of Long Island (Aug. 27, 1776) he was made a prisoner, but was woon exchanged; and in 1777 he was commissioned by Congress a major-general. He fought with Washington on the Brandywine on Sept. 11, 1777, and was specially distinguished at Germantown and Monmouth, commanding the left wing of the American army in the last-named engagement. He was one of the most faithful of Washington's soldiers during the war. William Alexander married a daughter of William Livingston, of New Jersey, and had been, like his father, surveyor-general. He was also an excellent mathematician and astr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andre, John, 1751- (search)
, in Canada, he was taken prisoner by Montgomery, at St. Johns (Nov. 2, 1775), and was sent to Lancaster, Pa. In December, 1776, he was exchanged, and promoted to captain in the British army. He was appointed aide to General Grey in the summer of 1777, and on the departure of that officer he was placed on the staff of Sir Henry Clinton, by whom he was promoted (1780) to the rank of major, and appointed adjutant-general of the British forces in America. His talents were appreciated, and wherevearch, 1901. Lord Grey, in examining a lot of family papers that had not been disturbed since the close of the Revolutionary War, discovered what was believed to be the original diary of Major Andre, in which is given a narrative of the campaign of 1777-78 day by day. The story of Major Andre‘s career, in connection with the complot of Sir Henry Clinton and Gen. Benedict Arnold (qq. v.), occupies a conspicuous place in our history, and sympathy for the offender, not unmixed with denunciation
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armand, Charles Teffin, Marquis de la Rouarie, (search)
Armand, Charles Teffin, Marquis de la Rouarie, French military officer; born near Rennes, in 1756; came to America in 1777, and entered the Continental army as a volunteer. He received the commission of colonel, and commanded a small corps, to which was attached a company of cavalry who acted as the police of camps. He was an exceedingly active officer, and was highly esteemed by Washington. In February. 1780, his corps was incorporated with that of Pulaski, who was killed at Savannah a icer, and was highly esteemed by Washington. In February. 1780, his corps was incorporated with that of Pulaski, who was killed at Savannah a few months before. In March, 1783, his services throughout the war from 1777 were recognized, and he was created a brigadier-general. Returning to France, he took part in the Revolution there, and was for a time a prisoner in the Bastile. The execution of Louis XVI. gave such a shock to his nervous system that he sank under it and died, Jan. 30, 1793.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 (search)
wounded in the leg. Montgomery was killed, and Arnold was promoted to brigadier-general (Jan. 10, 1776), and took command of the remnant of the American troops in the vicinity of Quebec. Succeeded by Wooster, he went up Lake Champlain to Ticonderoga, where he was placed in command of an armed flotilla on the lake. With these vessels he had disastrous battles (Oct. 11 and 13, 1776) with British vessels built at St. Johns. Arnold was deeply offended by the appointment, by Congress, early in 1777, of five of his juniors to the rank of major-general. He received the same appointment soon afterwards (Feb. 7, 1777), but the affront left an irritating thorn in his bosom, and he was continually in trouble with his fellow-officers, for his temper was violent and he was not upright in pecuniary transactions. General Schuyler admired him for his bravery, and was his abiding friend until his treason. He successfully went to the relief of Fort Schuyler on the upper Mohawk (August, 1777), wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barney, Joshua, 1759- (search)
the Continental schooner Wasp and British brig Tender, in Delaware Bay, before he was seventeen years of age, his conduct was so gallant that he was made a lieutenant. In that capacity he served in the Sachem (Capt. I. Robinson), and after a severe action with a British brig, in which his commander was wounded, young Barney brought her into port. Soon afterwards he was made a prisoner, but was speedily released, and in the Andrea Doria he was engaged in the defence of the Delaware River in 1777. He was again made prisoner, and was exchanged in August. 1778. A third time he was made captive (1779), and after his exchange was a fourth time made a prisoner, while serving in the Saratoga, 16, was sent to England, and confined in the famous Mill prison, from which he escaped in May, 1781. He was retaken, and again escaped, and arrived in Philadelphia in March, 1782, where he took command of the Hyder Ali, 16, in which he captured the General Monk, of heavier force and metal. For this
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