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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 241 241 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 58 58 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 30 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 24 24 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 19 19 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 12 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1777 AD or search for 1777 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
st style with statuary and painting, and holding every thing that conduces most to comfort and luxury, with books, magazines, and papers all within call. Here also you may meet the best society of London. I have often met Hallam Henry Hallam, 1777-1859. He invited Sumner several times to dine with him,—once in company with Professor Whewell,—and expressed his regard by other attentions. Sumner met the historian again in London, in September, 1857. at the Athenaeum. I was standing the othoveliest faces he ever looked upon: perhaps he saw and admired the character of the man in his countenance. I have heard many express themselves about him with the greatest fondness. He has a very handsome daughter. Williams John Williams, 1777-1846. He was from his youth distinguished for his excellence in classical studies; assisted Brougham and Denman in the defence of Queen Caroline; attacked in Parliament the delay of business in Chancery under Lord Eldon; became a baron of the Exc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
tell. Do not fail to let me know. July, 1838, Vol. XLVII. pp. 56-73. By Ralph Waldo Emerson. Jan. 27, 1839. Among the persons whom I have seen since I wrote the foregoing pages have been Leigh Hunt 1784-1859. and Thomas Campbell. 1777-1844. I yesterday morning saw Leigh Hunt, on the introduction of Carlyle. He lives far from town,—in Chelsea,—in a humble house, with uncarpeted entry and stairs. He lives more simply, I think, than any person I have visited in England; but he pining with him. There was a very pleasant party,—Rogers, Macaulay, Hallam, Milnes, Allen, Colonel Gurwood Colonel John Gurwood, 1791-1845; private secretary to the Duke of Wellington. (the editor of Wellington's Despatches), Sir Henry Ellis, 1777-1869; Librarian of the British Museum. Lord Aberdeen, Lord Hatherton, and Lord Seaford. During a long evening a variety of subjects have been discussed, from the dramatists, ancient and modern, down to the outbreak on the Maine frontier, the new<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
Jan. 27, 1839. Among the persons whom I have seen since I wrote the foregoing pages have been Leigh Hunt 1784-1859. and Thomas Campbell. 1777-1844. I yesterday morning saw Leigh Hunt, on the introduction of Carlyle. He lives far from town,—in Chelsea,—in a humble house, with uncarpeted entry and stairs. He lives more simply, I think, than any person I have visited in England; but he possesses a palace of a mind. He is truly brilliant in conversation, and the little notes of his which I have seen are very striking. He is of about the middle size, with iron-gray hair parted in the middle, and suffered to grow quite long. Longfellow has seen him, I think, and he will tell you about him. I believe I have already described to you Carlyle. I met Campbell at a dinner which Colburn, Henry Colburn died in 1855. His residence was at 13 Great Marlborough Street. the publisher, gave me last evening. There were Campbell, Jerdan, William Jerdan, born 1782, for thirty-four ye