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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1777 AD or search for 1777 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wisner, Henry 1725-1790 (search)
part of the powder used in the Revolutionary War was supplied. He also aided the patriot cause at the time of the war by having spears and gun-flints made, by repairing the roads in Orange county; and by erecting works and mounting cannon on the Hudson River. He was one of the committee that framed the first constitution of New York in 1777; was State Senator in 1777-82; and a member of the State convention of 1788, which ratified the national Constitution. He died in Goshen, N. Y., in 1790. part of the powder used in the Revolutionary War was supplied. He also aided the patriot cause at the time of the war by having spears and gun-flints made, by repairing the roads in Orange county; and by erecting works and mounting cannon on the Hudson River. He was one of the committee that framed the first constitution of New York in 1777; was State Senator in 1777-82; and a member of the State convention of 1788, which ratified the national Constitution. He died in Goshen, N. Y., in 1790.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wolcott, Oliver 1747-1797 (search)
twelve years (1774-86); also a major-general of militia, and judge of the county court of common pleas and of probate. In 1775 Congress appointed him a commissioner of Indian affairs to secure the neutrality of the Six Nations, and he became a member of Congress in January, 1776. After the Declaration of Independence he returned to Connecticut, invested with the command of the militia intended for the defence of New York, and in November resumed his seat in Congress. Late in the summer of 1777 he joined the army under Gates with several hundred volunteers, and assisted in the capture of Burgoyne and his army. On the field of Saratoga he was made a brigadier-general in the Continental service. In 1786 he was chosen lieutenant-governor of Connecticut, and served in that capacity ten years, when he was elected governor. He died in Litchfield, Conn., Dec. 1, 1797. Financier; born in Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 11, 1760; a son of the preceding; graduated at Yale College in 1778, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wythe, George 1726-1806 (search)
me very eminent in his profession for learning, industry, and eloquence. For many years he was a prominent member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. In 1764, as chairman of the committee appointed by the House of Burgesses, he reported a petition to the King, a memorial to the House of Lords, and a protest to the House of Commons, against the proposed Stamp Act, which were so bold in their tone that the House feared they were treasonable and refused to accept them until they were materially modified. He was Professor of Law from 1779 to 1789 in the College of William and Mary. He was an influential member of Congress from 1775 to 1777, when he was chosen speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates, and was appointed judge of the State high court of chancery. On the reorganization of the court of equity, he was made sole chancellor, and held the office over twenty years. Later he emancipated his slaves, and gave them means for subsistence. He died in Richmond, Va., June 8, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Yates, Robert 1738-1801 (search)
ring the controversies preceding the Revolutionary War he wrote several excellent essays upon the great topics of the time. He was a prominent member of the committee of safety at Albany; also chairman of the committee on military operations (1776-77), member of the Provincial Congress of New York, and of the convention that framed the first State constitution. He was judge of the Supreme Court of New York from 1777 to 1790, and chief-justice from 1790 to 1798. Judge Yates was a member of the me Court of New York from 1777 to 1790, and chief-justice from 1790 to 1798. Judge Yates was a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution, but left the convention before its close and opposed the instrument then adopted. He kept notes of the debates while he was in the convention. He was one of the commissioners to treat with Massachusetts and Connecticut respecting boundaries and to settle difficulties between New York and Vermont. He died in Albany, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1801.
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