hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 257 257 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 160 160 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 17 17 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 13 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 6 6 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 6 6 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
found among the baptisms: Hannah. Daut'r of Joseph Garrison of St. John's River in Nova Scotia but his wife a member of ye Chh here with her Child June 15, 1766. The last sentence, if punctuated thus, as it doubtless should be—but his wife, a member of the church, here with her child—is evidence of a visit of Mary Garrison to her old home at the date mentioned., Elizabeth (1767– 1815), Joseph (1769-1819), Daniel (1771-1803), Abijah (born 1773), Sarah (born 1776), Nathan (1778-1817), Silas (1780-1849), William (a posthumous child, 1783– 1837). The fifth in order, Abijah, must occupy our attention, to the exclusion of his brothers and sisters. The exact date of his birth was June 18, 1773, and the place Jemseg. He was named for his uncle Palmer. Except the romantic incident of his babyhood, already related, his early history is a blank. He alone of the family followed the sea. He became eventually a captain, and made many voyages, with his cousin Abijah Palmer as mate. His hour-
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
and cowards; but think not, he warns the editors of the National Intelligencer, that the great body of the descendants of the Pilgrims sanction Southern oppression. The abuse of a South Carolina journal he meets by holding up the editor as a renegade Lib. 1.9. from New England, who also advocates the rebellious doctrine of nullification. When informed that the late Judge Lowell, John Lowell, the grandfather of the poet. This humane jurist, a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1780, is the reputed author of the clause in the Massachusetts Bill of Rights—All men are born free and equal, etc.—which was designed to abolish slavery, and did in fact; and he offered his services gratuitously to any slave wishing to claim his freedom under it. who was born in Newburyport, was the first individual in Massachusetts who freed a slave, this fact, he says, speaking both for himself and for his partner, is peculiarly gratifying to us, being Lib. 1.21. ourselves natives of the sa