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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 149 149 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 84 84 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 21 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 6 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30.. You can also browse the collection for 1782 AD or search for 1782 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30., The Brooks Estates in Medford from 1660 to 1927. (search)
been left by any individual at that time in Boston. With that he always said that he never tried or expected to get more than six per cent on an investment. He abstained as a rule from speculative investments and he never borrowed. What he could not compass by present means was to him interdicted. One feels that the stern Puritan spirit of father and ancestors spoke in this man also. One wonders how, with such conservative principles, he accumulated his fortune. When I came to Boston in 1782, he writes, the country was wretchedly poor. It was the last year of the war; peace was declared in State street in January, 1783, about a month after I came. My father had died the year before, my mother was left with her four children with nothing but the farm of little more than one hundred acres, and on this some debts were due and so remained until I was able to pay them. We had to struggle through as well as we could. No woman could have done better, if so well, as my good mother.