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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1783 AD or search for 1783 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, William 1731-1811 (search)
Williams, William 1731-1811 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Lebanon, Conn., April 18, 1731; graduated at Harvard College in 1757, and was on the staff of his relative, Col. Ephraim Williams, when he was killed near Lake George in 1755. An active patriot and a member of the committee of correspondence and safety in Connecticut, he was sent to Congress in 1776. He wrote several essays to arouse the spirit of liberty in the bosoms of his countrymen, and spent nearly all his property in the cause. He had been speaker of the Connecticut Assembly in 1775, and in 1783-84 was again a member of Congress. He was also a member of the convention of Connecticut that adopted the national Constitution. Mr. Williams married a daughter of Governor Trumbull. He died in Lebanon, Conn., Aug. 2, 1811.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, James -1798 (search)
Wilson, James -1798 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born near St. Andrew's, Scotland, Sept. 14, 1742; educated in Scotland; came to America, and James Wilson. in 1766 was tutor in the higher seminaries of learning in Philadelphia, and studied law under John Dickinson. He was in the Provincial Convention of Pennsylvania in 1774, and was a delegate in Congress the next year, where he was an advocate for independence. From 1779 to 1783 he was advocate-general for France in the United States. Mr. Wilson was a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution, and of the Pennsylvania convention that adopted it; and was one of the first judges of the Supreme Court of the United States. He became the first Professor of Law in the University of Pennsylvania in 1790; and, with Thomas McKean, Ll.D., published Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States. He died in Edenton, N. C., Aug. 28, 1798. A vindication of the American colonies. —In the conve
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Witherspoon, John 1722- (search)
He had already written and published several works, and had acquired a fine reputation for scholarship. Under his administration the college flourished, financially and otherwise. He was not only president, but was Professor of Divinity; also pastor of the Presbyterian church at Princeton. At the beginning of the Revolution the college was for a time broken up, when President Witherspoon assisted in the patriotic political movements. He also assisted in framing a State constitution for New Jersey, and went as a delegate to Congress in time to advocate and sign the Declaration of Independence. For six years he was a punctual attendant of Congress, serving faithfully on important committees. He was a member of the secret committee and of the board of war. In Congress he opposed the repeated issues of paper money, and he wrote and published much on the topics of the time. In 1783 he went to England to collect funds for the college. He died near Princeton, N. J., Sept. 15, 1794.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wood, Eleazar Derby 1783- (search)
Wood, Eleazar Derby 1783- Military officer; born in New York City, in 1783; was instructed at West Point, and was one of the earlier graduates in the corps of engineers. He was an engineer in Harrison's campaign in 1813, and was brevetted major for his gallantry in the defence of Fort Meigs, of which he had been chief in its construction. In the autumn of 1813 he was General Harrison's adjutantgeneral, and distinguished himself in the battle of the Thames. For his services in the battle 1783; was instructed at West Point, and was one of the earlier graduates in the corps of engineers. He was an engineer in Harrison's campaign in 1813, and was brevetted major for his gallantry in the defence of Fort Meigs, of which he had been chief in its construction. In the autumn of 1813 he was General Harrison's adjutantgeneral, and distinguished himself in the battle of the Thames. For his services in the battle of Lundy's Lane, or Niagara, he was brevetted lieutenant-colonel. He was distinguished at Fort Erie, where he lost his life in a sortie, Sept. 17, 1814. Colonel Wood was much beloved by General Brown, who caused a handsome marble monument to be erected to his memory at West Point. Colonel Wood's monument at West Point.
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