Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1783 AD or search for 1783 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dickson, John, 1783-1852 (search)
Dickson, John, 1783-1852 Statesman; born in Keene, N. H., in 1783; graduated at Middlebury College in 1808; practised law in Rochester, N. Y., in 1813-25; member of Congress in 1831-35. He is credited with having delivered the first important anti-slavery speech ever made in Congress. He published Remarks on the presentation of several petitions for the abolition of slavery and the slave-trade in the District of Columbia. He died in West Bloomfield, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1852. Dickson, John, 1783-1852 Statesman; born in Keene, N. H., in 1783; graduated at Middlebury College in 1808; practised law in Rochester, N. Y., in 1813-25; member of Congress in 1831-35. He is credited with having delivered the first important anti-slavery speech ever made in Congress. He published Remarks on the presentation of several petitions for the abolition of slavery and the slave-trade in the District of Columbia. He died in West Bloomfield, N. Y., Feb. 22, 1852.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duane, James, 1733-1797 (search)
member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 11783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the [second] petition to the King prepared by John Jay. It was a dangerous James Duane proposal at that time, as it was calculated to cool the ardor of resistance which
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dunlap, William, 1766-1839 (search)
Dunlap, William, 1766-1839 Painter, dramatist, and historian; born in Perth Amboy, N. J., Feb. 19, 1766. His father, being a loyalist, went to New York City in 1777, where William began to paint. He made a portrait of Washington at Rocky Hill, N. J., in 1783. The next year he went to England and received instructions from Benjamin West. He became an actor for a short time, and in 1796 was one of the managers of the John Street Theatre, New York. He took the Park Theatre in 1798. From 1814 to 1816 he was paymaster-general of the New York State militia. He began a series of paintings in 1816. In 1833 he published a History of the American theatres, and in 1834 a History of the Arts of design. His history of New Netherland and the State of New York was published in 1840. Mr. Dunlap was one of the founders of the National Academy of Design. He died in New York City, Sept. 28, 1839.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duponceau, Peter Stephen, 1760-1844 (search)
Duponceau, Peter Stephen, 1760-1844 Philologist; born in the Isle of Rhea;, France, June 3, 1760; went to Paris in 1775, where he became acquainted with Baron Steuben, and accompanied him to America as his secretary. He was brevetted a captain (February, 1778), and assisted Steuben in the preparation of his system of military tactics for the use of the United States troops. From 1781 to 1783 he was secretary to Robert R. Livingston, then at the The old magazine at Williamsburg. head of the foreign office of the government; and then studying law, was admitted to practice in 1785, becoming eminent in the profession on questions of civil American Indians. In 1819 he published and international law. He finally devoted himself to literature and science, and made many valuable researches into the language and literature of the North a Memoir on the structure of the Indian Languages. When seventy-eight years of age (1838) he published a Dissertation on the Chinese language; also a t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dwight, Timothy 1752-1817 (search)
when he resigned the office. President Dwight was one of the American committee on Revision of the Bible from 1878 till 1885. Educator; born in Northampton, Mass., May 14, 1752; graduated at Yale College in 1769, and was a tutor there from 1771 to 1777, when he became an army chaplain, and served until October, 1778. During that time he wrote many popular patriotic songs. He labored on a farm for a few years, preaching occasionally, and in 1781 and 1786 was a member of the Connecticut legislature. In 1783 he was a settled minister at Greenfield and principal of an academy there; and from 1795 until his death was president of Yale College. In 1796 he began travelling in the New England States and in New York during his college vacations, and in 1821 he published his Travels in New England and New York, in 4 volumes. Dr. Dwight wrote some excellent poetry, revised Watt's version of the Psalms, and published many occasional sermons. He died in New Haven, Conn., Jan. 11, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eaton, William, -1811 (search)
Eaton, William, -1811 Military officer; born, in Woodstock, Conn., Feb. 23, 1764; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1790; entered the Continental army at the ageof sixteen; and was discharged in 1783. In 1797 he was appointed American consul at Tunis, and arrived there in 1799. He acted with so much boldness and tact that he secured for his country the freedom of its commerce from attacks by Tunisian cruisers. He returned to the United States in 1803; was appointed naval agent of the United States for the Barbary States, and accompanied the American fleet to the Mediterranean in 1804. He assisted Hamet Caramelli, the rightful ruler of Tripoli, in an attempt to recover his throne, usurped by his brother. Soon afterwards Eaton returned to the United States, and passed the remainder of his life at Brimfield. For his services to American commerce the State of Massachusetts gave him 10,000 acres of land. The King of Denmark gave him a gold box in acknowledgment of his services
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Estaing, Charles Henry Theodat, Count Da, 1729- (search)
nvoy, a part of the way, the homeward-bound West Indiamen of the mercantile marine. During his absence a detachment from Martinique captured the English island of St. Vincent. Being largely reinforced soon afterwards, D'Estaing sailed with his whole fleet and conquered the island of Grenada. Before the conquest was quite completed Byron returned, when an indecisive engagement took place, and the much-damaged British fleet put into St. Christopher's. D'Estaing then sailed (August, 1779) to escort, part of the way, the homeward-bound French West Indiamen; and, returning, engaged jointly with the American army in the siege of Savannah, but abandoned the contest before a promised victory for the allies was won. He returned to France in 1780, and in 1783 he commanded the combined fleets of France and Spain, and was made a Spanish grandee. He favored the French Revolution, and commanded the National Guards at Versailles, but falling under the suspicion of the Terrorists, he was beheaded.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fanning, Edmund -1818 (search)
1763) and clerk of the Supreme Court (1765). He was also a member of the legislature, and married the daughter of Governor Tryon. He became rapacious, and by his exorbitant legal fees made himself very obnoxious to the people. Their hatred was increased by his energetic exertions in suppressing the Regulator movement (see Regulators). He fled to New York with Governor Tryon to avoid the consequences of popular indignation. He was appointed surveyor-general of North Carolina in 1774. In 1776 he raised and led a force called the King's American Regiment of Foot. After the Revolution he went to Nova Scotia, where he became a councillor and lieutenant-governor in September, Edmund Fanning. 1783, and from 1786 to 1805 was governor of Prince Edward's Island. He rose to the rank of general in the British army in 1808. Fanning was an able jurist, and always regretted his later career in North Carolina. He was greatly influenced by his father-in-law. He died in London, Feb. 28, 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Few, William 1748-1828 (search)
Few, William 1748-1828 Jurist; born in Baltimore county, Md., June 8, 1748. His ancestors came to America with William Penn. His family went to North Carolina in 1758, and in 1776 William settled in Georgia, where he became a councillor, and assisted in framing the State constitution. He was in the military service, and in 1778 was made State surveyor-general. In 1780-83 and 1786 he was in Congress, and in 1787 assisted in framing the national Constitution. He was United States Senator in 1789-93; and was a judge on the bench of Georgia three years. In the summer of 1799 he removed to New York, and became a member of the legislature and a commissioner of loans. He died in Fishkill, N. Y., July 16, 1828.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fisheries, the. (search)
nt property. Indeed, New England had planned, and furnished the forces for, the first reduction of Cape Breton, and had rendered conspicuous assistance in the acquisition of Nova Scotia and Canada by the English. The Congress, on March 23, 1779, in committee of the whole, agreed that the right to fish on the coasts of Nova Scotia, the banks of Newfoundland, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the straits of Labrador and Belle Isle, should in no case be given up. In the final treaty of peace (1783) the fishery question was satisfactorily settled. In the summer of 1845 some ill-feeling was engendered between the United States and Great Britain concerning the fisheries on the coasts of British America in the East. American fishermen were charged with a violation of the treaty of 1818 with Great Britain, which stipulated that they should not cast their lines or nets in the bays of the British provinces, except at the distance of 3 miles or more from shore. Now the British Government
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