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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 194 194 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 46 46 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 14 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 13 13 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1783 AD or search for 1783 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
nusual exemption from the clash of arms, it is what I want; and I am thankful that I have such active and faithful outposts. For some days Sumner had charge of the guard of Major Andre, while he was under arrest and sentence of death; held frequent conversations with him, and conceived sincere respect for that unfortunate officer. Lieutenant-Colonel (afterwards General) William Hull commanded a detachment of light infantry, cavalry, and artillery, which guarded New York in the autumn of 1783, during the evacuation of the city by the British troops. Major Sumner was his second in command. General Hull, in a letter to Charles Pinckney Sumner, dated March 12, 1825, says: Your father was my particular friend, and we served together in those memorable scenes which never will be forgotten. At the close of the war he was my second in command, in a corps of light infantry, whose fortune it was to escort General Washington into New York, take possession of that city, at the time it
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
e American Jurist. He was admitted to the professor's confidence, and received peculiar help from his severe method of legal investigation. Ashmun insisted always on definiteness of thought and exactness of expression, and was in the habit of testing the knowledge of his favorite pupils by close scrutiny and criticism. This was a healthy discipline for one of Sumner's tastes and habits of study, and he profited much by it. Professor Ashmun was succeeded, in July, by Simon Greenleaf, 1783-1853; practised law in Maine, 1806-1833; professor at Cambridge, 1833-1848. the author of the treatise on The Law of Evidence; the vacancy being filled during the intervening period by James C. Alvord, of Greenfield, a young lawyer of marked ability. Both saw in Sumner a student of large promise, and became at once his friends. Professor Greenleaf's interest in him was hardly second to Judge Story's, and was prolonged after the close of Sumner's connection with the school as pupil or instru
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
Karl Joseph Anton Mittermaier. 1787-1867. of Heidelberg; and Arthur J. Johnes of Lincoln's Inn, London. Mr. Johnes had recently written a small volume on the Reform of the Court of Chancery, proposing the amalgamation of law and equity, which attracted Sumner's attention. American Jurist, April, 1835, Vol. XIII., pp. 459-465; a notice probably written by Sumner. Dr. Julius was a student of penitentiary science, and made Sumner's acquaintance during his visit to this country in 1835. 1783-1862. Dr. Nikolaus H. Julius. He lived at Hamburg the later years of his life. He gave his time largely to the inspection of prisons, and to writing upon prison systems. He was the German translator of Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature. Foelix, the editor of the Revue Étrangere, was afterwards to render Sumner substantial kindness during the latter's visit to Paris. Louis Wolowski 1810-1876. Wolowski was chosen a member of the Chamber of Deputies in 1848-49, and 1871, and afterwar
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
upon customary law. His voice was indistinct, so that I was not able to gather much from him. He was a man of about thirty-five or thirty-eight, with nothing striking or prepossessing in his manner. Feb. 9. Heard Magendie Francois Magendie, 1783-1855. He was eminent as a physiologist, and tested the science by experiments. More than his predecessors he used living animals for the purpose. this morning, at the College Royal de France. He is renowned for killing cats and dogs, as well as established, in 1810. He was in the Corps Legislatif from 1807 to 1811, and again from 1820 to 1830. He remained loyal to the Bourbons after the Revolution of 1830, and was then deprived of his professorship. but Duranton Alexandre Duranton, 1783-1866; author of a treatise on Contracts, and also of Commentaries on the Code Civil, in twenty-two volumes, entitled, Cours de Droit Francais suivant le Code Civil. and his twenty volumes he abused heartily, characterizing him as a charlatan, who
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
tant, Henri Benjamin Constant (Constant de Rebecque), 1767-1830; a distinguished political writer and editor. Guizot, 1787-1874. Laffitte, &c. The picture is historically interesting, but as a work of art there is little in it to excite admiration. Each of the ministers had a red portfolio, which gives occasion to the newspapers to speak of the contest for the portfolios of office, &c. At two o'clock I heard a sound of drums, and immediately M. Dupin, Andre Marie Jean Jacques Dupin, 1783-1865; the eminent lawyer and statesman. He defended Marshal Ney in 1815, and was much engaged in political trials while he remained at the bar. His career in the Chamber of Deputies was long and distinguished. He was elected its President eight times. As an orator he was remarkable for striking expressions. At times his bon-mots have created a majority or upset a cabinet. He was appointed Procureur-General in the Court of Cassation, after the Revolution of 1830, of which he was one of th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
the things I hear of you from all quarters. There is no company of lawyers or judges, where your name is not spoken with the greatest admiration. Mr. Justice Vaughan feels toward you almost as a brother. He has treated me with distinguished kindness; invited me to his country seat, and to go the circuit with him in his own carriage; he placed me on the bench in Westminster Hall,—the bench of Tindal, Eldon, and Coke,—while Sergeants Wilde and Talfourd, Atcherley David Francis Atcherley, 1783-1845. The Annual Register of 1845 (his death was on July 6) gives an account of his professional career. and Andrews argued before me. He has expressed the greatest admiration of your character. At dinner at his house I met Lord Abinger, the ViceChancellor, Mr. Justice Patteson, &c. With the Vice-Chancellor I had a long conversation about you and your works; he said that a few days ago your Conflict of Laws was cited, and he was obliged to take it home, and to study it a long evening, and t