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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 131 131 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 37 37 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 29 29 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 21 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1785 AD or search for 1785 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
d at its hardships. He had an ear and voice for music, and delighted in hunting-songs and marches rather than in psalmody. He enjoyed books, we are told, such as military dictionaries, State constitutions, Shakspeare, Don Quixote, and Smith's Wealth of Nations. One or more of these were the companions of his travels, and all of them he owned. Two relics of his handwriting remain,— copies of lines of poetry, one from Home's Douglass, and the other, Othello's apology. In the autumn of 1785, he was appointed by Congress a commissioner for settling the accounts between the Confederation and the State of Georgia. He remained in that State until his death, with occasional visits to his friends in New York and Boston, and his relatives in Milton. When in Massachusetts, he was usually the guest of Daniel Vose, at whose house in Milton he had lived before he entered college. In 1787, Governor John Hancock appointed him a justice of the peace,—a distinction then less common than
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ning; and I am disposed, from his lecture and appearance, to believe what I have been told of him. He is about fifty years old, with thick, uncombed iron-gray hair, and with a very vulgar look and manner. His voice was harsh and querulous, and there seemed no kind of grace in any thing he did. The subject of his lecture was Testaments and Donations inter vivos under the Code Civil. Feb. 22. This morning first heard, at the Sorbonne, Lefebure de Fourcy Louis Étienne Lefebure de Fourcy, 1785-1869. In 1838 he succeeded Lacroix in the chair of Differential and Integral Calculus. He is the author of books on geometry. on the differential and integral calculus. He lectures in the place of the venerable Lacroix. Perhaps there was an audience of twenty-five. Almost all had their note-books, and took down the explanations of the professor. He stood at his blackboard, and in a plain business style went through his calculations. The chalk and sponge were his chief implements. Of c
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
nd many of the deputies followed him into the antechamber, and the House was thrown into a great deal of confusion. It was very soon adjourned. After this went to view the Palais de laElysee Bourbon,—the palace which Murat with his wife, the sister of Bonaparte, occupied and adorned, and in which Bonaparte spent the last days of his reign. I was shown the chamber in which he slept, and in which he made his last abdication. This morning I called, with Mr. Ticknor, on the Duc de Broglie, 1785-1870. He descended from an ancient family of Piedmontese origin, and married the only daughter of Madame de Stael. His honorable efforts for the abolition of slavery deserve commemoration. In politics he affiliated with Guizot. He was for a time, under Louis Philippe, Minister of Public Instruction or of Foreign Affairs. His son Albert, born in 1821, has had a conspicuous place in recent French history. the late prime-minister of France. He is emphatically a gentleman,—his manners smooth
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
nry Wheaton, the publicist, introduced Sumner by letter to Lord Lansdowne. Sumner received attentions at Lansdowne House on his second visit to England, in 1857. in his study; I met him last evening at a party. He had previously been kind enough to call upon me, and presented me with a card for his great ball in honor of the Coronation, and also with a card of admission to the Abbey; the latter I gave away to a friend, Ralph Randolph Wormeley, afterwards Rear-Admiral of the British Navy, 1785-1852. as I was already provided with a better ticket, being that of a privy-councillor. A few nights ago I was at the great ball at Lord Fitzwilliam's; I started from my lodgings at eleven o'clock, and such was the crowd of carriages that I did not reach the door till one o'clock in the morning. When I first saw Lord Fitzwilliam, he was leading the Duchess of Gloucester on his arm; the Duc de Nemours came in immediately after me. As I stood in the hall, waiting for the carriage (it rained t