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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Constitution of the United States (search)
n a commercial arrangement, over which, by the existing Constitution, Congress had no control. Coming from such an exalted source, the suggestion was acted upon. A convention of delegates from the several States was called at Annapolis, Md. Only five States (New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Virginia) sent deputies. These met Sept. 11, 1786. There being only a minority of the States present, they deferred action, at the same time recommending another convention. On Feb. 21, 1787, the Congress, by resolution, strongly urged the several legislatures to send deputies to a convention to meet in Philadelphia in May following, for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation. Delegates were appointed by all the States excepting Rhode Island. The convention assembled at the appointed time (May 14), but only one-half the States were then represented. The remainder did not all arrive before May 24. Washington, who was a delegate from Virgi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
n in Massachusetts......1786 Ordinance establishing a United States mint passed by Congress......Oct. 16, 1786 Twelfth Continental Congress adjourns; 362 days session......Nov. 3, 1786 Thirteenth Continental Congress meets at New York......Nov. 6, 1786 Arthur St. Clair, of Pennsylvania, chosen president of Congress......Feb. 2, 1787 Congress advises the States to send delegates to a convention in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation, to meet May 14......Feb. 21, 1787 Congress by ordinance provides government for the territory northwest of the Ohio (now Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin)......July 13, 1787 Treaty between the United States and Morocco ratified......July 18, 1787 South Carolina cedes to the United States her claims to a strip 12 miles wide west of a line from the head of the Tugaloo River to the North Carolina border......Aug. 9, 1787 Delegates to the convention sign the Constitution......Sept. 17, 1787 Th
contract of alliance. The war of the Revolution was successfully waged, and resulted in the treaty of peace with Great Britain in 1783, by the terms of which the several States were each by name recognized to be independent. The articles of confederation contained a clause whereby all alterations were prohibited, unless confirmed by the Legislatures of every State after being agreed to by the Congress; and in obedience to this provision, under the resolution of Congress of the 21st of February, 1787, the several States appointed delegates for the purpose of revising the articles of confederation, and reporting to Congress and the several Legislatures such alterations and provisions therein as shall, when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the States, render the Federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies, of the Government, and the preservation of the Union. It was by the delegates chosen by the several States under the resolution just quoted, that the Constitution o
the original Thirteen States during the War of the Revolution, as framed by the Delegates of the United States of America in Congress assembled, on the 9th of July, 1778. This article is in these words: Each State retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated to the United States in Congress assembled. This was the vital defect in the articles of Confederation, and on the 21st of February, 1787, the Congress, after declaring the inefficiency of the Federal Union, and the necessity of devising such further provisions as should render the same adequate to the exigencies of the Union, and being satisfied that a Convention was-- The most probable means of establishing in these States a firm National Government, resolved that it was expedient that a Convention of Delegates appointed by the several States should be held on the second Monday in May then next, at Philadelphia, f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Shall Cromwell have a statue? (search)
ated for their own good without the intervention of a coercive power. I do not conceive we can exist long as a nation without having lodged somewhere a power, which will provide the whole Union in as energetic a manner as the authority on the State governments extends over the several States. (Ford Writings of Washington, Vol. XI, p. 53.) This, it will be observed, was within a few days less than seven months only before the passage by the Confederation Congress of the resolution of February 21, 1787, calling for the Convention, which, during the ensuing summer, framed the present Constitution. He looked upon the doctrine of secession as a heresy; but, none the less, it was a heresy indisputably then preached, and to which many, not in Virginia only but in New England also, pinned their political faith. Even the Devil is proverbially entitled to his due. So far, however, as the abstract question is of consequence, as the utterances of Professor Smith and Mr. Lodge conclusively
s contract of alliance, the war of the Revolution was successfully waged, and resulted in the treaty of peace with Great Britain in 1783, by the terms of which the several States were, such by name recognized to be independent. The articles of confederation contained a clause whereby all alterations were prohibited, unless confirmed by the Legislatures of every State, after being agreed to by the Congress; and in obedience to this provision under the resolution of Congress of the 21st February, 1787, the several States appointed delegates who attended a Convention, "for the safe and express purpose of revising the articles of confederation, and reporting to Congress and the several Legislatures such alterations and provisions therein as shall, when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the States, render the Federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of government and the preservation of the Union." It was by the delegates chosen, by the several States, under the resol