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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 137 137 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 44 44 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 16 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 6 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1788 AD or search for 1788 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Shall Cromwell have a statue? (search)
man; while they, on both of these vital issues, were proclaiming a crusade of reaction. Moreover, what availed the views or intentions of the framers of the Constitution? What mattered it in 1860 whether they, in 1787, contemplated a nation or only a more compact federation of sovereign States? In spite of logic and historical precedent, and in sublime unconciousness of metaphysics and abstractions, realities have unpleasant way of asserting their existence. However it may have been in 1788, in 1860 a nation had grown into existence. Its peaceful dismemberment was impossible. The complex system of tissues and ligaments, the growth of seventy years, could not be gently taken apart, without wound or hurt; the separation, if separation there was to be, involved a tearing asunder, supplementing a liberal use of the knife. Their professions to the contrary notwithstanding, this the southern leaders failed not to realize. In point of fact, therefore, believing fully in the abstrac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
Alabama. 25. Lieutenant-Colonel First Virginia Infantry; then colonel heavy artillery, Cape Fear District, N. C. Henry C. M'Neill. 1785. Born Mississippi. Appointed Texas. 26. Colonel, commanding Fifth Texas Cavalry, Thomas Green's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department. Aurelius F. Cone. 1787. Born Georgia. Appointed Georgia. 28. Lieutenant-Colonel, December 1o, 1863. Acting Assistant Quartermaster-General of Confederate States, Richmond, Va. Paul J. Quattlebaum. 1788. Born South Carolina. Appointed South Carolina. 29. Major, in 1862, Fifth Texas Infantry, Hood's Brigade, Longstreet's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. John S. Marmaduke. 1789. Born Missouri. Appointed Missouri. 30. Major-General, March 17, 1865. Commanded cavalry division, Sterling Price's Army, Trans-Mississippi Department. George W. Holt. 1790. Born Alabama. Appointed Alabama. 31. Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General to Lieutenant-General S. D.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
coln and his followers in forcing the seceding States back into the Union. A tyrannical sway was established over them. Our State governments have been debased and corrupted by negro suffrage forced upon us by them, a wrong the guilt of which and the evil consequences of which few are now found to deny. This is a cancerous sore eating into the heart of the body politic. The Union into which Virginia was forced in 1865 is utterly different from the one into which she entered voluntarily in 1788. This Government of the United States is now a government of one section, by that section and for that section. The Republic of Washington, Jefferson, Madison and other great men of those times has been changed into a nation ruling subject provinces; subject we say, just as really now as in 1866 in reconstruction days when Virginia was Military District No. I; for whatever political rights we now enjoy we have only as the gift of our conquerors. As puppets in their hands the conquered Sta