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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 165 165 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 41 41 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 27 27 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 10 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1793 AD or search for 1793 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Joel, 1793-1855 (search)
Abbot, Joel, 1793-1855 Naval officer: born in Westford, Mass., Jan. 18, 1793; entered the navy as midshipman at the beginning of the War of 1812: served first on the frigate President, and next on Lake Champlain with Commodore Macdonough, who when he asked Abbot if he were ready to die for his country received the reply: Certainly, sir; that is what I came into the service for. He was then ordered to enter the British lines as a spy and destroy a number of spars which had been stored at Sorel. For his success in this dangerous exploit and for his bravery in the engagement at Cumberland Head on Sept. 11, 1814, he received a sword of honor from Congress and was commissioned a lieutenant. He was given charge of the pirate ship Mariana in 1818; promoted commander in 1838; and in the following year was given command of the Boston navy-yard. During Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan in 1852 Abbot commanded the Macedonian, and later was appointed flag-officer of the squadron. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adair, John, 1759-1840 (search)
Adair, John, 1759-1840 Military officer; born in Chester county, S. C., in 1759. He served in the Continental army during the Revolution, and in the wars against the frontier Indians in 1791-93. He was United States Senator in Congress in 1805-6; and as volunteer aide to General Shelby at the battle of the Thames, in 1813, he showed much bravery and skill. He distinguished himself as commander of the Kentucky troops in the battle of New Orleans, in January, 1815. From 1820 to 1824 he was governor of Kentucky, having served in the legislature of that State; and from 1831 to 1833 was a Representative in Congress. He died in Harrodsburg, Ky., May 19, 1840.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adet, Pierre Augustus, 1763-1832 (search)
on of a government terrible to its enemies, but generous to its allies. With grandiloquent sentences he portrayed the disappointment of the French nation in not finding a warm friend in the American government. So far from offering the French the succor which friendship might have given. he said, without compromitting itself, the American government, in this respect, violated the obligations of treaties. This was followed by a summary of these alleged violations, including the circular of 1793. restraining the fitting-out of privateers in American waters; the law of 1794, prohibiting hostile enterprises or preparations against nations with whom the United States were at peace: the cognizance of these matters taken by the American courts of law; and the admission of armed British vessels into American waters. He complained of the British treaty as inimical to the interests of France. This paper. published in the Aurora, was intended more for the American people than for the Amer
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agricultural implements. (search)
y farm. The American machines are the best in the world, and are sold all over Europe and South America. The plough used in this country during the colonial period was made of wood, covered with sheet-iron, the share being of wrought-iron. In 1793, Thomas Jefferson, who had been experimenting on his Virginia farm, invented an improved mouldboard, which would turn a furrow without breaking it. In 1797, Charles Newbold, of Burlington. N. J., invented a castiron plough, and spent about $30,00-gin. The first machine of this kind was invented by M. Debreuil, a French planter of Louisiana, but did not prove successful. Whitney's cotton-gin, which did succeed, and increased the production of cotton tenfold in two years, was invented in 1793. The census of 1890 reported 910 establishments engaged in the manufacture of agricultural implements. These had a capital investment of $145.313,997, employed 42,544 persons, paid $21,811,761 for wages, and $31,603,265 for materials used in c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alamo, Fort, (search)
Alamo, Fort, A structure in San Antonio, Tex.; erected for a mission building in 1744; used for religious purposes till 1793, when, on account of the great strength of its walls, it was converted into a fort. In the struggle by Texas for independence, the most sanguinary and heroic conflict of the border warfare, which merged into the Mexican War, occurred there — a conflict which for years was familiar to Americans as the Thermopylae of Texas. The fort was about an acre in extent, oblong, and surrounded by a wall 8 or 10 feet in height by 3 feet in thickness. A body of Texans, under the command of Col. William Barrett Davis, retired into the fort early in 1836, upon the dismantling of San Antonio by Sam Houston, and then Santa Ana, with a large force, invested the fort Feb. 23. The Texans numbered only 140 men, while the Mexican army was 4,000 strong. The enemy took possession of the town, then erected batteries on both sides of the river, and for twenty-four hours bombarded
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
, President Washington called the attention of Congress to the matter, but the United States were without a navy to protect their commerce. For what protection American vessels enjoyed they were indebted to Portugal, then at war with Algiers. In 1793 the British government made a secret arrangement with that of Portugal, whereby peace with Algiers was obtained. In that arrangement it was stipulated that for the space of a year Portugal should not afford protection to the vessels of any nationdanger, was insulted by the Dey. Humphreys wrote, If we mean to have commerce, we must have a navy. Meanwhile the United States were compelled to pay tribute to the Dey to keep his corsairs from American commerce. From 1785 until the autumn of 1793, when Washington called the attention of Congress to the necessity of a navy, the Algerine pirates had captured fifteen American vessels and made 180 officers and seamen slaves of the most revolting kind. To redeem the survivors of these captives
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-federal party. (search)
Federalists in this contest; but, after the Constitution had been adopted, it was natural that these men should aim at a construction of its terms which should not give the new government extensive power. These temporary Federalists, in about 1791-93, united with the old Anti-Federalists, and the party that had absolutely opposed the Constitution, through fear of a strong central government, now became, through the same fear, the champions of the exact and literal language of the Constitution, became, through the same fear, the champions of the exact and literal language of the Constitution, and the opponents of every attempt to extend its meaning by ingenious interpretations of its terms. The former party name was no longer applicable, and in 1792, through the influence of Jefferson, it began to be called a Republican party, in opposition to the Monarchical Federalists. It soon adopted this name, in 1793, which was afterwards lengthened into the Democratic-Republican party (q. v.).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Apportionment, congressional, (search)
ic or the decennial census, determining the total number of members to be sent to the House of Representatives from each State of the Union. The ratio of representation, since the foundation of the government, has been as follows: From 1789 to 1793 as provided by the United States Constitution 30,000 From 1793 to 1803 based on the United States Census of179033,000 From 1803 to 1813 based on the United States Census of180033,000 From 1813 to 1823 based on the United States Census of181035,1793 to 1803 based on the United States Census of179033,000 From 1803 to 1813 based on the United States Census of180033,000 From 1813 to 1823 based on the United States Census of181035,000 From 1823 to 1833 based on the United States Census of182040,000 From 1833 to 1843 based on the United States Census of183047,700 From 1843 to 1853 based on the United States Census of184070,680 From 1853 to 1863 based on the United States Census of185093,420 From 1863 to 1873 based on the United States Census of1860127,381 From 1873 to 1883 based on the United States Census of1870131,425 From 1883 to 1893 based on the United States Census of1880151,912 From 1893 to 1903 based on the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Balcarres, Alexander Lindsay, Earl, (search)
Balcarres, Alexander Lindsay, Earl, British military officer; born in Scotland in 1752; served three years in America under Carleton and Burgoyne, and was captured with the latter at Saratoga. At the battle of Hubbardton, where he was wounded, thirteen balls passed through his clothes. He was made major-general in 1793; lieutenant-governor of Jamaica in 1794; general in 1803; and subsequently one of the representative peers from Scotland. He died in London, March 27, 1825.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Balfour, Nisbet, 1743-1823 (search)
Balfour, Nisbet, 1743-1823 British military officer; born in Dunbog, Scotland. in 1743. He was a son of an auctioneer and bookseller in Edinburgh; entered the British army as an ensign in 1761; commanded a company in 1770; was wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill in June, 1775. and again in the battle of Long Island. He was sent home with despatches after the capture of New York in 1776, and was brevetted major in November following. Served under Lord Cornwallis in Pennsylvania and the Carolinas; and was in command at Charleston in 1781, when he reluctantly obeyed the command of Lord Rawdon to execute Isaac Hayne (q. v.). He was then lieutenant-colonel. He was made colonel and aide-de-camp to his king in 1782. a major-general in 1793. lieutenant-general in 1798, and general in 1803. He died in Dunbog, Oct. 10, 1823.
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