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ice of Benjamin Hall as chairman, and Samuel Swan as clerk, the Hon. James Sullivan, Loammi Baldwin, and Captain Ebenezer Hall, were chosen a committee to attend the General Court, in order to obtain an act of incorporation, with suitable powers relating to the premises. In conformity with this vote, a petition was presented to the General Court, and a charter obtained ( incorporating James Sullivan, Esq., and others, by the name of the Proprietors of the Middlesex Canal ), bearing date June 22, 1793; and on the same day was signed by his excellency John Hancock, Governor of the Commonwealth. By this charter, the proprietors were authorized to lay assessments, from time to time, as might be required for the construction of said canal. At the first meeting of the proprietors, after the choice of James Sullivan as moderator, and Samuel Swan as clerk, the following votes were passed; viz., That the Hon. James Sullivan, Hon. James Winthrop, and Christopher Gore, Esq., be a comm
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
to ratify the Constitution of the United States convenes at Boston......Jan. 9, 1788 [Governor Hancock chosen president of the convention.] Constitution is ratified by a vote of 187 to 168......Feb. 6, 1788 Slave-trade prohibited in Massachusetts......March 26, 1788 John Adams elected Vice-President of the United States......1789 President Washington visits Boston......Oct. 24, 1789 Williams College at Williamstown, Berkshire county, founded......1790 [Incorporated June 22, 1793. Congregational.] John Hancock dies at Quincy, aged fifty-six......Oct. 8, 1793 Middlesex canal projected......1793 John Adams President of the United States......March 4, 1797 Frigate Constitution, Old Ironsides, built at Boston......1799 Bradford Academy (for women), Bradford, opened......1803 Andover Theological Seminary (Congregational ) opened......1808 State averse to war with England. The legislature, in an address to the people, declare themselves unable to
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex Canal. (search)
e of Benjamin Hall as chairman, and Samuel Swan, Esq., as clerk, the Hon. James Sullivan, Loammi Baldwin, and Captain Ebenezer Hall were chosen a committee to attend the General Court, in order to obtain an Act of Incorporation, with suitable powers relating to the premises. In conformity with this vote, a petition was presented to the General Court, and a charter obtained incorporating James Sullivan, Esq., and others, by the name of the Proprietors of the Middlesex Canal, bearing date June 22, 1793, and on the same day signed by His Excellency, John Hancock, Governor of the Commonwealth. By this charter the proprietors were authorized to lay assessments from time to time as might be required for the construction of said canal. It was further provided that the proprietors might hold real estate to the value of $30,000 over the value of the canal; also to render Concord River boatable as far as Sudbury Causeway, through Billerica, Carlisle, Bedford, Concord, to Sudbury, a distance
arrant the completion of the programme; even should communication never be established beyond Concord, the commercial advantages of opening to the market the undeveloped resources of upper New Hampshire would be a sufficient justification. Accordingly, James Sullivan, Loammi Baldwin, Jonathan Porter, Samuel Swan, Benjamin Hall, Willis Hall, Ebenezer Hall, Ebenezer Hall, Jr., and Andrew Hall petitioned the General Court for an act of incorporation. A charter was granted, bearing date of June 22, 1793, incorporating James Sullivan, Esq., and others, by the name of the Proprietors of the Middlesex Canal, and on the same day was signed by His Excellency John Hancock, Governor of the Commonwealth. By this charter the proprietors were authorized to lay such assessments from time to time as might be required for the construction of the canal. At their first meeting the proprietors intrusted the management of the corporation to a board of thirteen members, who were to choose a president
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
d the establishment of a new national government in whose territory would be found room abundant for new enterprises and ideas. One of the earliest of these, conceded to have originated with James Sullivan, afterward governor of Massachusetts, was the great enterprise of its time, the Middlesex Canal. So comprehensive was the idea of Judge Sullivan, that fully completed, it would have resulted in an inland waterway from Boston to Canada. Its charter was granted by the General Court, June 22, 1793, and immediately received the signature of the governor, John Hancock and the corporators organized by the choice of James Sullivan for President, and Col. Loammi Baldwin of Woburn and Gen. John Brooks of Medford as vice-presidents, while several other Medford men served its interests as directors. In these later years it has been rather facetiously remarked that in the case of railroads, ground is broken with much ceremony, and that afterward the stockholders are broken without ceremon
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., The Walnut Tree Hill division of the stinted pasture. (search)
r 1861. Mr. Hooper was present and witnessed the ceremony. The turf that covered the reservoir embankment came from land near the Second beach and reimbursed the owner of the land for his purchase thereof. [Ed.] After Mystic pond was abandoned as a water supply this reservoir fell into disuse. It is now used as a part of the water supply system of the Metropolitan Water Works. Across this pasture was located the Middlesex Canal, thirty feet in width and four feet deep. Chartered June 22, 1793, discontinued 1852. The Boston and Lowell Railroad location also runs across this pasture. Chartered June 5, 1830. This paper is mostly extracts from papers previously prepared and read before the Society, but it was deemed expedient to embody all extracts relating to the subject in one paper in order to more fully explain the annexed maps. The lines of several lots were difficult to locate. The central lots are fairly accurate; some of those on the westerly side of the pasture n