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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
y the British to withdraw)Oct. 9, 1779 War with the Indians. Miami RiverOct. 19 and 22, St. Clair's DefeatNov. 4, 1791 Fort St. ClairNov. 6, 1792 Near Fort St. ClairOct. 17, 1793 Fort RecoveryJune 30, 1794 Maumee Rapids (Fallen Timber)Aug. 20, 1794 TippecanoeNov. 7, 1811 War of 1812-15. Fort MackinawJuly 17, 1812 BrownstownAug. 4, 1812 MaguagaAug. 9, 1812 Chicago (Massacre at)Aug. 16, 1812 Detroit (Surrendered)Aug. 16, 1812 Fort HarrisonSept. 4 and 5, Fort MadisonSept. 4-6, 18y the British to withdraw)Oct. 9, 1779 War with the Indians. Miami RiverOct. 19 and 22, St. Clair's DefeatNov. 4, 1791 Fort St. ClairNov. 6, 1792 Near Fort St. ClairOct. 17, 1793 Fort RecoveryJune 30, 1794 Maumee Rapids (Fallen Timber)Aug. 20, 1794 TippecanoeNov. 7, 1811 War of 1812-15. Fort MackinawJuly 17, 1812 BrownstownAug. 4, 1812 MaguagaAug. 9, 1812 Chicago (Massacre at)Aug. 16, 1812 Detroit (Surrendered)Aug. 16, 1812 Fort HarrisonSept. 4 and 5, Fort MadisonSept. 4-6, 18
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fallen Timbers, battle of. (search)
Fallen Timbers, battle of. On the morning of Aug. 20, 1794, General Wayne, on his campaign in the Indian wilderness, advanced with his whole army from his camp at Roche de Bout, at the head of the Maumee Rapids, according to a plan of march prepared by his young aide-de-camp, Lieut. William Henry Harrison. He had proceeded about 5 miles, when they were smitten with a terrible volley of bullets from a concealed foe, and compelled to fall back. They were on the borders of a vast prairie, at a dense wood, in which a tornado had prostrated many trees, making the movements of mounted men very difficult, and forming an excellent cover for the foe, who were composed of Canadians and Indians, 2,000 in number, posted on their lines within supporting distance of each other. But Wayne's troops fell upon them with fearful energy, and made them flee towards the British Fort Miami, below, like a herd of frightened deer for cover. In one hour the victory was complete. The fugitives left
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
ed that a British force was sent to the rapids of the Maumee, where they built a fort, and inspired the Indians with the hope that the British would join them in fighting the forces of the United States. All efforts to make a peaceable settlement on any other basis than the abandonment on the part of the United States of all territory north of the Ohio having failed, General Wayne proceeded with that wonderful vigor which had made him famous on so many fields of the Revolution, and on Aug. 20, 1794, defeated the Indians and their allies on the banks of the Maumee, and completely broke the power of their confederation. On Aug. 3, 1795, General Wayne concluded at Greenville a treaty of lasting peace with these tribes and thus opened the State to settlement. In this treaty there was reserved to the Indians the same territory west of the Cuyahoga as described in the treaty of Fort McIntosh of 1785. Fifth. Settlement of the Western Reserve. I have now noticed briefly the ad
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Imperialism. (search)
done before they were brought to terms in a treaty. The battle at Miami Village, Sept. 30, 1790, between about 1,800 Americans under General Harmar, and a somewhat larger body of Indians under various chiefs, resulted in a victory for the Indians, with a loss of 120 men killed and 300 wigwams burned. Another pitched battle was fought near the same place the next year. The Indians were again victorious, and the American loss was more than half the army— 631 killed and 263 wounded. On Aug. 20, 1794, General Wayne, with 900 United States soldiers, routed the Indians in a battle near Miami Rapids, and a year later a treaty of peace was concluded, by the terms of which nearly the whole of Ohio was ceded by the Indians to the United States. It will be observed that with five years of war we had got no farther west than Ohio. And these battles with the Indians in the Miami Valley were more bloody than any ever fought by American armies with white men. This long and bloody Indian
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battle of the Maumee Rapids, or fallen Timbers, (search)
Battle of the Maumee Rapids, or fallen Timbers, At the Maumee Rapids, in northern Ohio, Wayne completely routed 2,000 Indians, on Aug. 20, 1794. The Americans lost thirty-three killed and 100 wounded. The battle ended the Indian war in the Northwest.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Morris recalled as minister to France, and James Monroe appointed......May 27, 1794 An act relating to neutrality passed......June 5, 1794 Post-office Department permanently establisbed......1794 Tariff act of 1792 further amended by increasing the ad valorem rates of duty......June 7, 1794 First session adjourns......June 9, 1794 Whiskey insurrection in western Pennsylvania......July–November, 1794 Gen. Anthony Wayne defeats the Indians near Maumee Rapids, in Ohio......Aug. 20, 1794 French minister Fanchet's despatch supposed to compromise Edmund Randolph, Secretary of State, intercepted by the British, and shown to the United States government; Randolph resigns......1794 Second session opens at Philadelphia, Pa.......Nov. 3, 1794 Draft of treaty with England agreed to by John Jay, special envoy......Nov. 19, 1794 Stringent naturalization law passed, requiring renunciation of titles of nobility......Jan. 29, 1795 Act passed for gradual redemption of p
s appointed to command against the Indians. Marching into the Indian country late in the autumn of 1793, he built a stockade near the scene of St. Clair's defeat, naming it Fort Recovery; here he remained until the spring of 1794, when he proceeded through the wilderness to the Maumee. Before meeting the Indians in battle, Wayne offered to treat, but on their refusal advanced with his usual dash and vigor, with about 2,000 men, and defeated them at Fallen Timbers, or Maumee Rapids......Aug. 20, 1794 General Wayne's treaty with the Indians at Greenville, Darke county......Aug. 3, 1795 Town of Dayton laid out......Nov. 4, 1795 First settlement on the Western Reserve begun at Conneaut, the Plymouth of the Reserve ......July 4, 1796 Town of Chillicothe laid out......1796 Settlement started at Cleveland......September, 1796 William Henry Harrison appointed secretary of Northwestern Territory......1798 Steubenville settled......September, 1798 Governor St. Clair
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Rensselaer, Solomon 1774-1852 (search)
Van Rensselaer, Solomon 1774-1852 Military officer; born in Rensselaer county, N. Y., Aug. 6, 1774; was a son of Henry Killian Van Rensselaer; entered the military service as cornet of cavalry in 1792, and in the battle of Fallen Timbers, fought by Solomon Van Rensselaer. Wayne, Aug. 20, 1794, was shot through the lungs. From 1801 to 1810 he was adjutant-general of New York militia. He was lieutenant-colonel of New York volunteers in 1812, and commanded the troops that attacked those of the British at Queenston, Oct. 13 of that year. At the landing-place he received four wounds, and had to be carried back to Lewiston. From 1819 to 1822 he was a member of Congress, and from 1822 until 1839 postmaster at Albany. He published a Narrative of the affair at Queenston (1836). He died in Albany, N. Y., April 23, 1852.