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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 182 182 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 16 16 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 9 9 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1795 AD or search for 1795 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adet, Pierre Augustus, 1763-1832 (search)
Adet, Pierre Augustus, 1763-1832 French diplomatist; born in Nevers in 1763. He was ambassador to the United States in 1795-97. Here he interfered too much in local politics, and became unpopular with the government party. He issued an inflammatory address to the American people, in which he accused the administration of Washington with violations of the friendship which once existed between the United States and France. On Nov. 5, 1796, he issued the famous cockade proclamation, or order. calling upon all Frenchmen in the United States, in the name of the French Directory, to mount and wear the tricolored cockade, the symbol of a liberty the fruit of eight years toil and five years victories. Adet declared in his proclamation that any Frenchman who might hesitate to give this indication of adherence to the republic should not be allowed the aid of the French consular chanceries or the national protection. The tricolored cockade was at once mounted, not only by the French r
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
tates were compelled to pay tribute to the Dey to keep his corsairs from American commerce. From 1785 until the autumn of 1793, when Washington called the attention of Congress to the necessity of a navy, the Algerine pirates had captured fifteen American vessels and made 180 officers and seamen slaves of the most revolting kind. To redeem the survivors of these captives. and others taken more recently, the United States government paid about $1,000,000 in ransom-money. In the autumn of 1795 the government was compelled to agree, by treaty, to pay to the Dey of Algiers an annual tribute for the relief of captured seamen. according to long usage among European nations. It was humiliating, but nothing better could then be done. and humanity demanded it. In 1812 the Dey. offended because he had not received from the American government the annual tribute in precisely such articles as he wanted, dismissed the American consul, declared war, and his corsairs captured American vessel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ira, 1751-1814 (search)
t, and took a distinguished part in public affairs in Vermont, his adopted State, where he served in the legislature, and was secretary of state, surveyor-general, and a member of the council. He was a military leader in the war for independence, and was one of the commissioners sent to Congress to oppose the claims of neighboring provinces to jurisdiction in Vermont. He effected an armistice with the British in Canada in 1781, and by so doing brought about a settlement of the controversy with New York. As senior major-general of the State militia in 1795, he went to Europe to purchase arms for his commonwealth, and on his way homeward with muskets and cannon he was captured, taken to England, and charged with being an emissary of the French, and intending to supply the Irish malcontents with arms. After long litigation the matter was settled in Allen's favor. He wrote a National and political history of Vermont, published in London in 1798, and died in Philadelphia, Jan. 7, 1814.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 (search)
self to the practice of his profession; but finally, on account of declining health, gave it up to engage exclusively in agricultural pursuits. In 1804 he was chosen president of Harvard College, but declined the honor. He received the degree of Ll.D. from that institution. His orations, essays, and letters were collected and published in 1 volume, with a biographical sketch by Rev. Dr. Kirkland, in 1809. So powerful was his great speech in Congress in favor of Jay's Treaty, on april 28, 1795, that an opposition member moved to postpone the decision of the question that they might not vote under the influence of a sensibility which their calm judgment might condemn. He died in Dedham, July 4, 1808. Speech on Jay's treaty. The following are extracts from his speech made on April 28, 1796: The treaty is bad, fatally bad, is the cry. It sacrifices the interest, the honor, the independence of the United States, and the faith of our engagements to France. If we listen to t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Amherst, Sir Jeffrey, 1717- (search)
Bath. In 1763 he was appointed governor of Virginia. The atrocities of the Indians in May and June of that year aroused the anger and the energies of Sir Jeffrey, and he contemplated hurling swift destruction upon the barbarians. He denounced Pontiac as the chief ringleader of mischief ; and, in a proclamation, said, Whoever kills Pontiac shall receive from me a reward of £100 ($500). He bade the commander at Detroit to make public proclamation for an assassin to pursue him. He regarded the Indians as the vilest race of creatures on the face on the earth; and whose riddance from it must be esteemed a meritorious act, for the good of mankind. He instructed his officers engaged in war against them to take no prisoners, but to put to death all that should fall into their hands. Sir Jeffrey was made governor of the island of Guernsey in 1771; created a baron in 1776; was commander-in-chief of the forces from 1778 to 1795; and became field-marshal in July, 1796. He died Aug. 3, 1797
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, Lorrin, 1795- (search)
Andrews, Lorrin, 1795- Missionary; born in East Windsor, Conn., April 29, 1795; was educated at Jefferson College and Princeton Theological Seminary. In 1827 he went to the Hawaiian Islands as a missionary, and founded there, in 1831, the Lahainaluna Seminary, which subsequently became the Hawaii University, where he passed ten years as a professor. In 1845 he was appointed a judge and seeretary of the privy council. His writings include a translation of a portion of the Bible into the Hawaiian language; several works on the literature and autiquities of Hawaii, and a Hawaiian dictionary. He died Sept. 29. 1868.
ort of good order and for safety against incursions of barbarians on the borders of expanding settlements; and a well-regulated militia, under the control of the respective States, forms an ample body of citizen soldiery. The first act for the enrolment in the militia of all ablebodied white men of eighteen and under forty-five years of age was passed by Congress in 1792. This act provided that in the organization there should be infantry, cavalry, and artillery. An act was passed early in 1795 which empowered the President, in case of invasion, or imminent danger thereof, to call forth the militia of the State or States most convenient to the place of danger. He was also empowered, in case of insurrection, or when the laws of the United States should be opposed by a combination too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, to call out the militia. The Civil War gave full examples of the working of our military system. When combinations in the slav
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bard, John, 1716-1799 (search)
Bard, John, 1716-1799 Physician; born in Burlington, N. J., Feb. 1, 1716; was of a Huguenot family, and was for seven years a surgeon's apprentice in Philadelphia. Establishing himself in New York, he soon ranked among the first physicians and surgeons in America. In 1750 he assisted Dr. Middleton in the first recorded dissection in America. In 1788 he became the first president of the New York Medical Society; and when, in 1795, the yellow fever raged in New York, he remained at his post, though then nearly eighty years of age. He died in Hyde Park, N. Y., March 30, 1799.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Joel, 1754- (search)
o Land Company, he published, in aid of the French Revolution, Advice to the privileged orders. To this he added, in 1791, a Letter to the National convention, and the Conspiracy of Kings. As deputy of the London Constitutional Society, he presented an address to the French National Convention, and took up his abode in Paris, where he became a French citizen. Barlow was given employment in Savoy, where he wrote his mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was United States consul at Algiers in 1795-97, where he negotiated treaties with the ruler of that state, and also with the Bey of Tunis. He took sides with the French Directory in their controversy with the American envoys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and called his seat there Kalorama. In 1807 he published the Columbiad, an epic poem. It was illustrated with
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beatty, John, 1749-1826 (search)
graduated at Princeton in 1769; studied medicine with Dr. Rush; took up arms, and became a colonel in the Pennsylvania line. He was made prisoner at Fort Washington, and suffered much. In 1778 he succeeded Elias Boudinot as commissary-general of prisoners. but resigned in 1780. He was a delegate in the Congress of the Confederation, 1783-85, and of the national Congress. 1793-95. He was secretary of state for New Jersey for ten years--1795--1805. He died at Trenton, N. J., April 30, 1826. graduated at Princeton in 1769; studied medicine with Dr. Rush; took up arms, and became a colonel in the Pennsylvania line. He was made prisoner at Fort Washington, and suffered much. In 1778 he succeeded Elias Boudinot as commissary-general of prisoners. but resigned in 1780. He was a delegate in the Congress of the Confederation, 1783-85, and of the national Congress. 1793-95. He was secretary of state for New Jersey for ten years--1795--1805. He died at Trenton, N. J., April 30, 1826.
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