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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 182 182 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 48 48 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 16 16 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 9 9 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1795 AD or search for 1795 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
of the productions of Mozart. The performers were the famous Italians, who now stand the highest in the musical world,—Signori Rubini Giovanni Battista Rubini, 1795-1854; reputed the first Italian tenor of his time. (Don Ottavio); Tamburini Antonio Tamburini, 1800-1876. After singing in Italian theatres, he appeared first tudent of medicine. The buildings were quite old and rugged, but vast and with spacious courts. The great surgeon, Velpeau, Alfred Armand Louis Marie Velpeau, 1795-1867. He wrote upon surgical anatomy and obstetrics, and was eminent in the clinical art. has charge of the surgical wards at this institution, and, as professor,style superior to that of any minister ever sent by America. Feb. 16. In the morning before breakfast visited the wards of Dubois Baron Paul Antoine Dubois, 1795-1871; celebrated both in the practice and teaching of his profession, and as a writer upon obstetrics. He was accoucheur to the Empress Eugenie at the birth of th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ontinues, the literary editor of the New York Tribune. He edited, with Charles A. Dana as associate, the American Cyclopaedia. Mr. Brooks. Rev. Charles Brooks, 1795-1872; a Unitarian clergyman in Hingham, Mass., and afterwards Professor of Natural History in the University of New York. Mr. Bancroft, but particularly Mr. Brownse debate, a huissier, whose place was very conspicuous, being directly on a level with the President, sat with his chair on its hind-legs. Another,—M. Salvandy 1795-1856. the Minister of Public Instruction,—sat for some time, cutting with his pen-knife the mahogany desk before him. There were a good many speakers, one of whom nt portrait of Louis Philippe. April 8. Had a treat to-day of an opposite kind from that of yesterday, —heard M. Coquerel Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel, 1795-1868. This French Protestant divine, born in Paris, preached twelve years in Holland, and returned to Paris in 1830. He served, in 1848 and 1849, as a moderate R<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
and a renewal of intercourse in later visits to Europe: and there were those, like Lord Morpeth, Robert Ingham, Joseph Parkes, and Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, with whom a lifelong friendship was established. The persons already named are referred to more or less frequently in his letters. There were many others not mentioned in them with whom he had more or less association, and from whom he received hospitality or civilities. Some of these are the following: George Peabody,American banker, 1795-1869. W. Empson, son-in-law of Lord Jeffrey (Hertford). Thomas Longman, Jr. (2 Hanover Terrace, Regent's Park). Arthur J. Johnes, of Lincoln's Inn (4 South Bank, Alpha Road). Petty Vaughan (1788-1854), son of Benjamin Vaughan, of Hallowell, Me. (70 Fenchurch Street). Sir George Rose (Hyde Park Gardens). Robert Alexander (13 Duke Street, Westminster). J. N. Simpkinson (21 Bedford Place, Russell Square). J. Guillemard (27 Gower Street). Graham Willsmore, of Plowden Buildings Temple (1 Endsleigh
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
three formed the guests of the bar. Our healths were drunk, and I was called upon to make a reply, which I did on the spur of the moment. From Bodmin, I went still farther in Cornwall to visit the high-sheriff, and his mines,—the largest that are there; his seat is the palace of the old Cornish kings,—you have doubtless seen pictures of it repeatedly; it is a perfect castle, and has a most romantic situation. I then travelled in the carriage of a friend,— Crowder, Richard Budden Crowder, 1795-1859. He became Recorder of Bristol in 1846, and a Judge of the Common Pleas in 1854. Sumner dined with him in February, 1839, at his house, 11 Pall Mall East. one of the Queen's counsel,—through portions of Cornwall, and that most beautiful county, Devon, stopping at Plymouth; being received by the commander of the largest ship in port, a barge placed at my orders to visit any ship I wished, and an officer designated to show me over the dockyard. From Exeter I went up through the green f