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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 1 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for February 28th, 1795 AD or search for February 28th, 1795 AD in all documents.

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ned to involve their States in the rebellion. In this state of things the President, under his sworn duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, determined on resorting to the means afforded by the second section of the act of 28th February, 1795, and by the act of the 3d of March, 1807. He believed that the laws of the United States were being opposed, their execution obstructed, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by thciples they contain support what the President has done. In the same opinion, speaking of the power of the President alone to decide whether the exigency exists authorizing him to call out the militia under the first section of the act of 28th February, 1795, and maintaining it, and denying to the court the right to revise it, it is said: If it could, (that is, if the Court could revise,) then it would become the duty of the Court (provided it came to the conclusion that the President had