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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 137 137 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 25 25 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 25 25 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 16 16 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 15 15 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1797 AD or search for 1797 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
nd in 1663 was chosen clerk of ye training band. Roger, the second son From his third son, George, who lived on Brush Hill, Milton, descended, in the fifth generation, Increase Sumner; an associate justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, 1782-97, and the successor of Samuel Adams, in 1797, as governor of the Commonwealth. of the emigrant ancestor, was baptized at Bicester, Aug. 8, 1632. Marrying Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to La1797, as governor of the Commonwealth. of the emigrant ancestor, was baptized at Bicester, Aug. 8, 1632. Marrying Mary Josselyn, of Lancaster, he had seven children. In 1660, he removed from Dorchester to Lancaster, that he might, with other Christians at Lancaster, join together for the gathering of a church; but, after the destruction of that town by the Indians, he removed to Milton (set off from Dorchester and incorporated in 1662), where he became the deacon of the first church, and died in 1698. His fourth son, William, who was born about 1673, had, for his seventh child, Seth, who was born in 1710, and became, by two marriages, the father of thirteen children. By the first marriage he had
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
d, who was two years his junior in the course. A correspondence ensued. Their letters are playful, and hopeful of the future. Sumner's letters refer to books and poems he had read, as Hogarth Moralized, Roberts' Epistle to a Young Gentleman on leaving Eton School, Masson's Elegy to a Young Nobleman leaving the University, Pope's Eloisa to Abelard, Goldsmith's Edwin and Angelina, Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher. In 1797-98 he passed nearly a year in the West Indies. He then began the study of law with Judge George R. Minot, an historical writer and effective public speaker. As early as 1799 he accepted an invitation from Josiah Quincy to a desk in his law-office; and was, while the relation continued, accustomed to have charge of the office, and to sleep in Mr. Quincy's house on Pearl Street during his absences from the State. Mr. Quincy was soon absorbed in politics, as a leader of the Federal party, a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
the fulness and invention of his mind. He has inquired after you. I suppose we shall see you soon, returned to occupy your new rooms. Prof. Longfellow began in Sept., 1837, to occupy rooms at the Craigie House, Washington's headquarters,—an estate which he afterwards purchased, and where he has since resided. Yours ever faithfully, Charles Sumner. To Dr. Francis Lieber. Boston, Sept. 11, 1837. my dear Lieber,—On Nepotism, see a capital letter of General Washington, written in 1797, to John Adams. Works of John Adams, Vol.VIII. p. 530. Sparks's Life and Writings of George Washington, Vol. XI. p. 188. Lieber had applied to Sumner by letter, Sept. 2, 1835, while writing his Political Ethics, for information relative to the appointment of Bushrod Washington to an office. Ante, p. 173. Lieber's Political Ethics (1875), Vol. II. pp. 30-34. Sumner, in a speech in the Senate, May 31, 1872, treated at length of Nepotism, with reference to the administration of President G
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
apartment. He is an old man,—I should say sixty-five or seventy,—with hair white with age, and of an interesting appearance. His manner was interesting, and he sprinkled his legal commentary upon the Code of Procedure with some plaisanteries, the exact bearing of which it was difficult for me to comprehend. I sat at some distance from him; and he spoke so low that I could hear but little of what he said. After him I heard in the École de Droit Royer-Collard, Albert Paul Royer-Collard, 1797-1865; nephew of the eminent French statesman (Pierre Paul). His favorite study was the law of nations. He was, 1845-1847, the dean of the Law Faculty. a younger man,—say thirty-eight or forty,—full in body and face, and looking as if well-fed and content with the world. His subject was the Droit des gens; and he was considering this morning the quality of Consuls. He commenced by reviewing the history of antiquity to see if there were any persons recognized, anterior to modern times, as
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
rary labors have been immense, and his political elevation is now as distinguished as his literary. He is no longer in the ministry, but he is intensely regarded by all parties for the expansion of his views and their deep philosophical reflection. In his personal carriage, as I saw him at a distance, he reminded me of Mr. Theron Metcalf, Ante, p. 176. of Dedham. His forehead is high; but he is not bald, though his hair is thin. His face is mild and gentle in its expression. M. Thiers, 1797-1877. In 1873, Sumner was the guest at dinner of Thiers, then President of the Republic. the celebrated author of the History of the French Revolution, is a most distinguished member of the Chamber. I did not hear him speak; but I narrowly regarded him. He is but little above the middle size, with sleek black hair, and with a bright countenance which seemed to content itself with short and momentary looks. Laffitte Jacques Laffitte, 1767-1844. sat on the extreme gauche; that is, at the e
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
nd to think that he had him on the hip. He praised Roebuck as a person of great talent; and spoke of Erskine as a very great man. When I asked who at the bar now was most like him, he said: Nobody: there is a degenerate race now; there are no good speakers at the bar, except Sir William Follett and Mr. Pemberton. He spoke of Lord Langdale as a person who had never done any thing, and who never would do any thing, and who was an ordinary man. He said that Mr. and Mrs. Austin, John Austin, 1797-1860; author of The Province of Jurisprudence Determined; and Mrs. Sarah Austin of the Taylor family of Norwich, the translator of Ranke's History of the Popes, and other German works. Mrs. Austin died in 1867. Their daughter, Lady Duff Gordon, well-known in literature, died in Egypt, in 1869.—who had just returned from Malta, where Mr. Austin went to reform the law,—would probably cease to be reformers, having experienced the practical difficulties of reform, and would retire disheartened