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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 186 186 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 40 40 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 26 26 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1801 AD or search for 1801 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolitionists. (search)
favor, since they aimed at nothing practical or troublesome, except petitions to Congress, and served as a moral palliative to the continuance of the practice. The abolition of the African slave-trade by Great Britain in 1807, and by the United States in 1808, came as a great relief to the abolition societies, which had grown discouraged by the evident impossibility of effecting anything in the South, and were now ready to accept this success as the limit of possibility for the present. In 1801, Thomas Jefferson and Gov. James Monroe, of Virginia, had considerable correspondence on the subject of colonizing free blacks outside of the country. In the autumn of 1816, a society for this purpose was organized in Princeton, N. J. The Virginia Legislature commended the matter to the government, and in December, 1816, the National Colonization Society met in Washington. Its object was to encourage emancipation by procuring a place outside of the United States, preferably in Africa, to wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Henry, 1838- (search)
Adams, Henry, 1838- Historian; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 16, 1838; third son of Charles Francis, st; was graduated at Harvard College in 1858; acted as private secretary to his father while the latter was American minister to Great Britain, in 1861-68; was Associate Professor of History at Harvard in 1870-77; and editor of the North American review in 1870-76. His principal works are, Historical essays; Documents relating to New England Federalism; History of the United States from 1801 to 1817 (9 volumes).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John, 1735- (search)
Adams, John, 1735- Second President of the United States; from 1797 to 1801; Federalist; born in Braintree (near Quincy), Mass.. Oct. 30, 1735. He was graduated at Harvard College in 1755, and immediately afterwards taught school at Worcester, where he began the study of law. His father was in moderate circumstances — a selectman and a farmer. Beginning the profession of law in Braintree in 1758, he soon acquired a good practice; and, when he was twenty-nine years of age, he married Abigail Smith, an accomplished woman possessed of great common-sense. His first appearance in the political arena was as author of Instructions of the town of Braintree to its Representatives on the subject of the Stamp act, which was adopted by over forty towns. Associated with Gridley and Otis in supporting a memorial addressed to the governor and council, praying that the courts might proceed without the use of stamps, Adams opened the case by declaring that the Stamp Act was void, as Parliament
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
ther (who was American minister) to England and France and returned home with him early in 1785. After his graduation at Harvard, he studied law with the eminent Theophilus Parsons, practised at Boston, and soon became distinguished as a political writer. In 1791 he published a series of articles in favor of neutrality with France over the signature of Publius. He was engaged in the diplomatic service of his country as minister, successively, to Holland, England, and Prussia from 1794 to 1801. He received a commission, in 1798, to negotiate a treaty with Sweden. At Berlin he wrote a series of Letters from Silesia. Mr. Adams married Louisa, daughter of Joshua Johnson, American consul at London, in 1797. He took a seat in the Senate of Massachusetts in 1802, and he occupied one in that of the United States from 1803 until 1808. when disagreeing with the legislature of Massachusetts on the embargo question, he resigned. From 1806 to 1809 he was Professor of Rhetoric in Harvard C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
h, Alabama became entitled to representation in Congress; and on July 14, 1868, the military relinquished to the civil authorities all legal control. The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the national Constitution were ratified by Alabama, the latter Nov. 16, 1870. Population in 1890, 1,508,073; in 1900, 1,828,697. Governors of the Mississippi Territory. Including the present States of Alabama and Mississippi. Names.Term of office. Winthrop Sargent1799 to 1801 Wm. C. C. Claiborne1801 to 1805 Robt. Williams1805 to 1809 David Holmes1809 to 1817 Governor of the Territory of Alabama. Wm. Wyatt BibbMarch 1817 to Nov. 1819 Governors of the State of Alabama. Wm. Wyatt BibbNov. 1819 to July, 1820 Thomas BibbJuly, 1820 to Nov. 1821 Israel PickensNov. 1821 to Nov. 1825 John MurphyNov. 1825 to Nov. 1829 Gabriel MooreNov. 1829 to Mar. 1831 Saml. B. MooreMar. 1831 to Nov. 1831 John GayleNov. 1831 to Nov. 1835 Clement C. ClayNov. 1835 to July, 1837 Hugh McVayJuly, 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Archibald, 1772- (search)
Alexander, Archibald, 1772- Theologian; born in Augusta (now Rockbridge) county. Va., April 17, 1772; was of Scotch descent, and became teacher in a Virginian family at the age of seventeen years. In 1791 he entered the ministry as an itinerant missionary in his native State. In 1789 he became president of Hampden-Sidney College; left it in 1801; married a daughter of Rev. Mr. Waddell, the celebrated blind preacher in Virginia, and afterwards (1807) became pastor of a Presbyterian church in Philadelphia. In 1810 he was elected president of Union College, Georgia, but did not accept it. On the establishment of the Theological Seminary at Princeton. N. J., in 1811, Dr. Alexander was chosen its first professor, which position he held until his death. Oct. 22, 1851. Among his numerous writings his Outlines of the evidences of Christianity, used as a text-book in several colleges, is most extensively known. It has passed through many editions in various languages.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 (search)
Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 Military officer; born in Norwich, Conn., Jan. 14, 1741. As a boy he was bold, mischievous, and quarrelsome. Apprenticed to an apothecary, he ran away, enlisted as a soldier, but deserted. For four years (1763-67) he was a bookseller and druggist in New Haven, Conn., and was afterwards master and supercargo of a vessel trading to the West Birthplace of Benedict Arnold. Indies. Immediately after the affair at Lexington, he raised a company of volunteers and marched to Cambridge. There he proposed to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety an expedition against Fort Ticonderoga, and was commissioned a colonel. Finding a small force, under Colonels Easton, Brown, and Allen, on the same errand when he reached western Massachusetts, he joined them without command. Returning to Cambridge, he was placed at the head of an expedition for the capture of Quebec. He left Cambridge with a little more than 1,000 men, composed of New England musketeers and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 (search)
hip Washington be carried tribute from the United States to the Dey of Algiers, by whom he was treated with much insolence. By threats of capture and a declaration of war by the Algerine ruler, he was compelled to take an embassy to Constantinople for that petty despot. On his return, with power given him by the William Bainbridge. Sultan, Bainbridge frightened the insolent Dey, compelling him to release all Christian prisoners then in his possession. He returned to the United States in 1801, and he was again sent to the Mediterranean with the frigate Essex. Upon the declaration of war against the United States by Tripoli, in 1803, Bainbridge was put in command of the Philadelphia, one of Preble's squadron. On Oct. 11 the Philadelphia struck on a rock neal Tripoli, and was captured, with her commander and crew. At Tripoli Bainbridge and 315 of his men remained prisoners about nineteen months. On his return to the United States, he was received with great respect, and in the re
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baldwin, Abraham, 1754-1807 (search)
Baldwin, Abraham, 1754-1807 Legislator; born in Guilford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1754; originated the University of Georgia, and was its president for several years; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1785-88, and a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1787. In 1789-99 he was a Representative in Congress, and was then elected to the United States Senate, of which he was president pro tem. in 1801-02. He died in Washington, D. C., March 4, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benson, Egbert, 1746-1833 (search)
Benson, Egbert, 1746-1833 Jurist; born in New York City, June 21, 1746; was graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1765; took an active part in political events preliminary to the war for independence; was a member of the Committee of Safety, and, in 1777, was appointed the first attorney-general of the State of New York. He was also a member of the first State legislature. He was a member of the Continental Congress from 1784 to 1789, and of the new Congress from 1789 to 1793, also from 1813 to 1815. From 1789 to 1802, he was a regent of the New York University, judge of the Supreme Court of New York (1794-1801), and of the United States Circuit Court. He was the first president of the New York Historical Society. Judge Benson was the author of a Vindication of the captors of Major Andre;, and a Memoir on Dutch names of places. He died in Jamaica, Long Island, Aug. 24, 1833.
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