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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 131 131 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 50 50 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 37 37 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22.. You can also browse the collection for 1802 AD or search for 1802 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., William Gray of Salem and Samuel Gray of Medford. (search)
ened his academy. The Warren house was moved to a lot on the Woburn road (High street) further west and the Gray family lived in it until the new house was built, 1802 or 1803, on the site of the old one. The house built by Samuel Gray is still standing just west of the Public Library. The old house became the home of the Roach name, and the remains of the cellar can be seen east of Grace Church parsonage. Though information at hand from two sources states the purchase of the land was 1802 and the erection of the house 1802 or 1803, and the church recorded the baptism of a child in 1806 and one in 18I I, yet Samuel Gray is not listed as a resident ta1802 or 1803, and the church recorded the baptism of a child in 1806 and one in 18I I, yet Samuel Gray is not listed as a resident tax payer till 1811. From 1805 (records missing 1803 and 1804) till 1811 he is classed as non-resident, also non-resident in 1813, resident in 1814 and 1815. The diary of Rev. William Bently states Mr. Gray moved to Medford 8i i. Samuel Gray died January 21, 1816, aged fifty-six. His wife, Mary, died January 30, 1842, aged sev
nce days had been a quarter century gone ere the Mistick was bridged again, this time by a more massive structure, strong enough to carry, not a highway, but a waterway, with its superincumbent weight, the aqueduct of the Middlesex canal. This in 1802. Thirty-two years more and the canal was to have a rival, and Lowell railroad bridge was built nearby, the Winthrop bridge in 1855, and the Usher bridge in 1857. In 1863 the Charlestown Water-works bridge, and in 1873 the Canal bridge on the old gan to fill an embankment requiring a bridge across the old course of the Aberjona at the upper end of the lake. This, the upper reach of the Mystic (and sometimes called Symmes' river) had been crossed by the long wooden aqueduct of the canal in 1802, replaced by the substantial stone structure of 1827, removed in 1865, as was also the Symmes dam and waterpower the same year. If we trace the stream farther up we go beyond old Medford bounds and out of Upper Medford, as it used to be called.
iew shows the Lowell railroad embankment, built in 1834, across the marshland of Charlestown (now Somerville) on the right, looking down stream. The lines of the river bank are here much changed, but the stone arch remains, embedded in the newer one of concrete, built in 1906. The upper right-hand view is Canal bridge, over which Boston avenue was built in 1873. There were four spans, in all one hundred and thirty-four feet, the length of the first canal aqueduct, which was here built in 1802. Renewed in 1827, on the old abutments and on three new granite piers, it remained disused from 1852 to 1873, gradually becoming a picturesque ruin, until utilized as here seen. The name was given it by the city government, at the request of the Historical Society, in 1903. The iron cover in the foreground is of the Metropolitan sewer siphon, and the daisies were in full bloom when the photographer looked up stream here. The earliest portion of the parkway to be built in Medford was fro