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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 172 172 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 13 13 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1803 AD or search for 1803 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Jacob, 1803- (search)
Abbott, Jacob, 1803- Writer for youth; born in Hallowell, Me., Nov. 14, 1803. He was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1820. and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1825. From 1825 to 1829 he was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Amherst College. He chose the pursuit of literature in the attractive and useful field of affording instruction to the young. One of the earliest of his almost 200 volumes printed was The young Christian, issued the year of his gradution at Andover. His books are remarkable for their wealth of information, their absolute purity of tone and expression, and for their wonderful attractiveness for the young of both sexes. Few men have done so much for the intellectual and moral training of the young for lives of usefulness as Jacob Abbott. His interest in young people never abated through a long and laborious life. His later years were spent upon the old homestead at Farmington, Me., significantly called Few acres, for its area of land
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Isaac, 1803-1883 (search)
Adams, Isaac, 1803-1883 Inventor born in Rochester, N. H., in 1803; learned the cabinet-maker's trade; in 1824 settled in Boston and worked in a machine shop. He invented the printing-press to which his name was given in 1828, and two years later it was perfected and soon came to be generally used. In 1840 he was elected to the Massachusetts Senate. He died in Sandwich, N. H., July 19, 1883. Adams, Isaac, 1803-1883 Inventor born in Rochester, N. H., in 1803; learned the cabinet-maker's trade; in 1824 settled in Boston and worked in a machine shop. He invented the printing-press to which his name was given in 1828, and two years later it was perfected and soon came to be generally used. In 1840 he was elected to the Massachusetts Senate. He died in Sandwich, N. H., July 19, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
rance over the signature of Publius. He was engaged in the diplomatic service of his country as minister, successively, to Holland, England, and Prussia from 1794 to 1801. He received a commission, in 1798, to negotiate a treaty with Sweden. At Berlin he wrote a series of Letters from Silesia. Mr. Adams married Louisa, daughter of Joshua Johnson, American consul at London, in 1797. He took a seat in the Senate of Massachusetts in 1802, and he occupied one in that of the United States from 1803 until 1808. when disagreeing with the legislature of Massachusetts on the embargo question, he resigned. From 1806 to 1809 he was Professor of Rhetoric in Harvard College. In the latter year he was appointed by President Madison minister to Russia; and in 1814, while serving in that office, he was chosen one of the United States commissioners to negotiate a treaty of peace at Ghent. After that, he and Henry Clay and Albert Gallatin negotiated a commercial treaty with Great Britain, which
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Samuel, 1722-1803 (search)
Adams, Samuel, 1722-1803 Patriot: born in Boston, Sept. 27, 1722; was graduated at Harvard College in 1742, and was honored with the degree of Ll.D. by it in 1792. The tendency of his mind was shown when, at the age of twenty-one. receiving the degree of A. M., he proposed, and took the affirmative on, the question Whether it be lawful to resist the supreme magistrate if the commonwealth cannot otherwise be preserved? He published a pamphlet at about the same time entitled Englishmen's rights. He became an unsuccessful merchant, but a successful writer: and gained great popularity by his political essays against the administration of Governor Shirley. Stern in morals. a born republican, and with courage equal to his convictions, Samuel Adams was a natural leader of the opposers of the Stamp Act and kindred measures of Parliament, and from that period (1765) until the independence of the colonies was achieved he was a foremost leader of the patriot host. He suggested Samu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agricultural implements. (search)
feet long, drawn by four yoke of oxen, and turned a furrow two feet wide and one foot deep, may be regarded as the unwieldy precursor of the admirable and efficient sulky ploughs of later times. The value of inventive genius to the farmer, however, is not shown as much in the improvements of the plough as in the mowers and reaping-machines which to-day take the places of sickle, scythe, and cradle, laboriously wielded by our forefathers. The first reaping-machine in America was patented in 1803 by Richard French and John J. Hankins. One wheel of the machine ran in the grain, and the cutting was done by a number of scythes which revolved on a pivot. It did not prove very successful. Two or three other like machines were patented in the following twenty-five years. In 1831 the Manney mower was patented, which was the first successful machine of the kind. In 1833, Mr. Obed Hussey, of Cincinnati. O., patented a reaper, with saw-toothed cutters and guards, which was immediately put
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Apportionment, congressional, (search)
e sent to the House of Representatives from each State of the Union. The ratio of representation, since the foundation of the government, has been as follows: From 1789 to 1793 as provided by the United States Constitution 30,000 From 1793 to 1803 based on the United States Census of179033,000 From 1803 to 1813 based on the United States Census of180033,000 From 1813 to 1823 based on the United States Census of181035,000 From 1823 to 1833 based on the United States Census of182040,000 F1803 to 1813 based on the United States Census of180033,000 From 1813 to 1823 based on the United States Census of181035,000 From 1823 to 1833 based on the United States Census of182040,000 From 1833 to 1843 based on the United States Census of183047,700 From 1843 to 1853 based on the United States Census of184070,680 From 1853 to 1863 based on the United States Census of185093,420 From 1863 to 1873 based on the United States Census of1860127,381 From 1873 to 1883 based on the United States Census of1870131,425 From 1883 to 1893 based on the United States Census of1880151,912 From 1893 to 1903 based on the United States Census of1890173,901
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
Arkansas, One of the Southwestern States; discovered by De Soto in 1541, who crossed the Mississippi near the site of Helena. It was next visited by father Marquette (q. v.) in 1673. It was originally a part of Louisiana, purchased from the French in 1803, and so remained until 1812, when it formed a part of Missouri Territory. It was erected into a Territory in 1819, with its present name, and remained under a territorial government until 1836, when a convention at Little Rock, its present capital, formed a State constitution. Its first territorial legislature met at Arkansas Post in 1820. On June 15, 1836, Arkansas was admitted into the Union as a State. In 1861 the people of Arkansas were attached to the Union, but, unfortunately, the governor and most of the leading politicians of the State were disloyal, and no effort was spared by them to obtain the passage of an ordinance of secession. For this purpose a State convention of delegates assembled at the capital (Littl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Attakappa Indians, (search)
Attakappa Indians, A tribe found on the borders of the Gulf of Mexico, west of the Mississippi River, in southern Louisiana and eastern Texas. The Choctaws named them Attakappas, or Man-eaters. The French were the first Europeans who discovered them; and the Attakappas aided the latter in a war with the Natchez and Chickasaws. When Louisiana. was ceded to the United States in 1803, there were only about 100 of this nation on their ancient domain, near Vermilion Bayou, and they had almost wholly disappeared by 1825. What their real name was, or whence they came. may never be known. Their language was peculiar, composed of harsh monosyllables.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 (search)
ure and a declaration of war by the Algerine ruler, he was compelled to take an embassy to Constantinople for that petty despot. On his return, with power given him by the William Bainbridge. Sultan, Bainbridge frightened the insolent Dey, compelling him to release all Christian prisoners then in his possession. He returned to the United States in 1801, and he was again sent to the Mediterranean with the frigate Essex. Upon the declaration of war against the United States by Tripoli, in 1803, Bainbridge was put in command of the Philadelphia, one of Preble's squadron. On Oct. 11 the Philadelphia struck on a rock neal Tripoli, and was captured, with her commander and crew. At Tripoli Bainbridge and 315 of his men remained prisoners about nineteen months. On his return to the United States, he was received with great respect, and in the reorganization of the navy, in 1806, he became the seventh in the list of captains. Having obtained the rank of commodore, Bainbridge was appoin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Balcarres, Alexander Lindsay, Earl, (search)
Balcarres, Alexander Lindsay, Earl, British military officer; born in Scotland in 1752; served three years in America under Carleton and Burgoyne, and was captured with the latter at Saratoga. At the battle of Hubbardton, where he was wounded, thirteen balls passed through his clothes. He was made major-general in 1793; lieutenant-governor of Jamaica in 1794; general in 1803; and subsequently one of the representative peers from Scotland. He died in London, March 27, 1825.
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