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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 172 172 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 13 13 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1803 AD or search for 1803 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
tence, if punctuated thus, as it doubtless should be—but his wife, a member of the church, here with her child—is evidence of a visit of Mary Garrison to her old home at the date mentioned., Elizabeth (1767– 1815), Joseph (1769-1819), Daniel (1771-1803), Abijah (born 1773), Sarah (born 1776), Nathan (1778-1817), Silas (1780-1849), William (a posthumous child, 1783– 1837). The fifth in order, Abijah, must occupy our attention, to the exclusion of his brothers and sisters. The exact date of his bd's relatives on the Jemseg, and here perhaps was born Mary Ann, who died in infaney. In 1801 they were settled in Duke Street, St. John, where a son, James Holley, was born to them on July 10, and possibly also a second daughter, Caroline Eliza (1803). Subsequently they removed to Granville, Nova Scotia, in the neighborhood of Fanny's sister Nancy (Mrs. Thomas Delap). To this period belongs the following fragment of a letter from the sailor to his wife: Abijah to Fanny Lloyd Garrison.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
tically unchecked (for the public at large) either by personal acquaintance or by candid perusal of his writings. A single contemporary instance will show the force of this ignorance and prejudice even in the most enlightened and unbigoted and humanitarian circles. At Concord, Mass., on his Middlesex County lecturing tour, Charles C. Burleigh A native of Plainfield, Conn., born in 1810, and one of a highly-gifted family of brothers. His father, Rinaldo Burleigh, was a graduate of Yale (1803), acquired a high reputation as teacher of the academy in Plainfield, and became president of the first anti-slavery society in Windham Co. His mother, Lydia Bradford, a native of Canterbury, was a lineal descendant of Governor Wm. Bradford, of the Mayflower. Charles Burleigh was admitted to the bar in January, 1835, his examination showing remarkable proficiency. Already, however, his editorial defence of Miss Crandall (ante. p. 416) had committed him to the cause of abolition, and he soon