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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 172 172 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 13 13 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22.. You can also browse the collection for 1803 AD or search for 1803 AD in all documents.

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ssels built in Medford, which then numbered 359. Mr. Baker is certainly to be commended for his interest in Medford history and for his contribution to Medford annals. By the publication of the History of Medford, Mr. Brooks preserved this register and completed it to date, a total enumeration of 513. Thirty years later Mr. Usher alluded to the same and said it is too extensive for admission here, but gave an abstract of the same, which shows the number built in each of the seven decades, 1803 to 1873, and totals 567, 483 in the first five, and 84 in the last two, decades. Thirty of these last were named in detail by Mr. Brooks. All Mr. Usher said relative to the other is, The last ship built in this town was launched from the ship yard of Mr. Joshua T. Foster in 1873. He did not even give the name. Thus it appears (except in the above) there were 54 ships built in Medford, of which there is no record of name, owner, builder, style or tonnage, and that, too, in a history pa
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., William Gray of Salem and Samuel Gray of Medford. (search)
academy. The Warren house was moved to a lot on the Woburn road (High street) further west and the Gray family lived in it until the new house was built, 1802 or 1803, on the site of the old one. The house built by Samuel Gray is still standing just west of the Public Library. The old house became the home of the Roach See seen east of Grace Church parsonage. Though information at hand from two sources states the purchase of the land was 1802 and the erection of the house 1802 or 1803, and the church recorded the baptism of a child in 1806 and one in 18I I, yet Samuel Gray is not listed as a resident tax payer till 1811. From 1805 (records miss ground. It is in the northwest corner, extending under the passageway which in our youth was called Deadman's alley. On the plan accompanying Dr. Swan's thesis, 1803, it is marked Burying Yard Lane. So distinctive a name as Deadman's alley would, in London, draw hundreds of visitors to it yearly. Its official name is River st