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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 160 160 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 34 34 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 34 34 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 12 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1804 AD or search for 1804 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
y, largely still resident in that town, trace their lineage. His great-grandson, Joshua, married a descendant of Governor William Bradford, from whom Charles Sumner is thus descended. Martha Hersey, a sister of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, married Elisha Simmons, of Hanover, who died, in 1825, at the age of eighty. The site of his residence is near that of Perez Simmons, but on the opposite side of the way. One of his sons was William Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1804, a judge of the police court of Boston, and the father of William H. Simmons, a graduate of Harvard College, of the class of 1831, and of Rev. George F. Simmons, of the class of 1832. Judge Simmons and Charles Pinckney Sumner were faithful friends, and their families maintained an intimacy. Joshua Hersey, a brother of Mrs. Relief Sumner's mother, lived on Prospect Street in South Hingham, under Prospect Hill, a well-known landmark. Upon this estate now live his children. of Hingham, and die
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
y French in this conversation. Feb. 14. Heard this morning, at the École de Droit, M. Oudot, Francois Julien Oudot, 1804-1864. whom I had formerly seen presiding at an examination of students. He lectured on hypothecation. His manner was uniix, where I passed three hours in conversation. I met there M. Bravard, Pierre Claude Jean Baptiste Bravard-Veyrieres, 1804-1861. His specialty was Commercial Law. He served in the Constituent Assembly of 1848, and in the Legislative Assembly ofy in mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy. He became a professor at the College of France as early as 1800. In 1804 he ascended in a balloon with Gay-Lussac, and, in 1806, accompanied Arago to Spain on a scientific expedition with which ty in mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy. He became a professor at the College of France as early as 1800. In 1804 he ascended in a balloon with Gay-Lussac, and, in 1806, accompanied Arago to Spain on a scientific expedition with which t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ntries. His translation of Plato was completed in thirteen volumes; a collected edition of his works, in twenty-two volumes, was published in 1847. Under Louis Philippe he was for a while Minister of Public Instruction, and engaged in the debates of the Chamber of Peers. His connection with public affairs ended in 1848. I offered him a chair, and he was good enough to sit with me for more than an hour. He inquired after Mr. Henry, Caleb S. Henry; a clergyman born in Rutland, Mass., in 1804. In 1834 he published Cousin's Psychology, being a translation of Cousin's lectures on Locke's Essay on the Human Understanding. He was one of the founders of the New York Review, and from 1839 to 1852 Professor of History and Philosophy in the University of New York. Mr. Ripley, George Ripley was born in Greenfield, Mass., Oct. 3, 1802. He published, 1838-1842, Edited Specimens of Foreign Standard Literature, which contained his translations of Cousin, Jouffroy, and B. Constant. He wa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
mstances. He regarded him as the first artist of the age, and was attached to him by two-fold relations,—first, as his own friend, and then as the affectionate friend of Coleridge. Coleridge and Allston became intimate friends at Rome, between 1804 and 1808. Sumner referred, in his oration of Aug. 27, 1846, to their intimacy at this time. Works. He desired me to convey to him his warm regards, and those of Mrs. Wordsworth and all his family. He was pleased when I told him that the Ticknorewater and Grosvenor collections of pictures. Her note of Oct. 20, 1838, welcomed him to Holkham. You would be amused to see Lord Spencer, John Charles, third Earl of Spencer, 1782-1845. As Lord Althorp, he served in the House of Commons from 1804 to 1834, and was Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1830 to 1834. His integrity and good sense won him a leading position in Parliament. Miss Martineau, referring to his retirement, says: Lord Althorp, now become Lord Spencer, was thus soon at lib