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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 133 133 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 54 54 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 24 24 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 20 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE OF SALLUST. (search)
s, which appeared at Leipsic in 1724, and has been often reprinted, long indisputably held the first rank. But Cortius, as an editor, was somewhat too fond of expelling from his text all words that he could possibly pronounce superfluous; and succeeding editors, as Gerlach (Basil. 1823), Kritz (Leipsic, 1834), and Dietsch (Leipsic, 1846), have judiciously restored many words that he had discarded, and produced texts more acceptable in many respects to the generality of students. Sallust has been many times translated into English. The versions most deserving notice are those of Gordon (1744), Rose (1751), Murphy (1809), and Peacock (1845.) Gordon has vigor, but wants polish; Rose is close and faithful but often dry and hard; Murphy is sprightly, but verbose and licentious, qualities in which his admirer, Sir Henry Steuart (1806), went audaciously beyond him; Mr. Peacock's translation is equally faithful with that of Rose, and far exceeds it in general ease and agreeableness of style.
He claimed to be in search of horses. He was attacked by 150 Spaniards, who killed him and some of his men, and made prisoners of the others. Ellis Bean, the second in command, was held a prisoner eleven years. In 1800 Louisiana was restored by Spain to France, and in 1803 ceded by France to the United States. Under this cession the United States set up some claim to Texas, and the boundary-line itself between Texas and Louisiana was left undetermined. Hostilities seemed impending in 1806, but were averted by compromise. In the same year Lieutenant Pike explored Red River and the Arkansas, evading the Spaniards sent to capture him, until he was arrested on the Rio Grande and sent prisoner to Chihuahua. The population of Texas was at that time estimated at 7,000, of whom 2,000 were at San Antonio and 500 at Nacogdoches, including a good many Americans. The first revolutionary movements in Mexico were in 1808. When Joseph Bonaparte took the throne of Spain in that year, t
iterate and superstitious, they corresponded to that nomadic class still to be met with throughout the South, and known as poor whites. They are happily and vividly depicted in the description of a camp-meeting held at Elizabethtown, Kentucky, in 1806, which was furnished me in August, 1865, by an eye-witness. J. B. Helm, Ms. The Hanks girls, narrates the latter, were great at camp-meetings. I remember one in 1806. I will give you a scene, and if you will then read the books written 1806. I will give you a scene, and if you will then read the books written on the subject you may find some apology for the superstition that was said to be in Abe Lincoln's character. It was at a camp-meeting, as before said, when a general shout was about to commence. Preparations were being made; a young lady invited me to stand on a bench by her side where we could see all over the altar. To the right a strong, athletic young man, about twenty-five years old, was being put in trim for the occasion, which was done by divesting him of all apparel except shirt and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The historical basis of Whittier's <persName n="Frietchie,,Barbara,,," id="n0044.0081.00618.13102" reg="default:Frietchie,Barbara,,," authname="frietchie,barbara"><foreName full="yes">Barbara</foreName> <surname full="yes">Frietchie</surname></persName>. (search)
lly or partially confirming the story, among whom was the late Dorothea L. Dix.--Editors. he followed as closely as possible the account sent him at the time. He has a cane made from the timber of Barbara's house,--a present from Dr. Stiener, a member of the Senate of Maryland. The flag with which Barbara Frietchie gave a hearty welcome to Burnside's troops has but thirty-four stars, is small, of silk, and attached to a staff probably a yard in length. Barbara Frietchie was born at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Her maiden name was Hauer. She was born December 3d, 1766, her parents being Nicholas and Catharine Hauer. She went to Frederick in early life, where she married John C. Frietchie, a glover, in 1806. She died December 18th, 1862, Mr. Frietchie having died in 1849. In 1868 the waters of Carroll Creek rose to such a height that they nearly wrecked the old home of the heroine of Whittier's poem. Union hospital in a barn near Antietam Creek. After a sketch made at the time.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
na Light Infantry, the Moultrie Guards, the Marion Artillery, the Charleston riflemen, the Meagher Guard of Irishmen, and the German riflemen. More than a column of the Mercury of December 21, now before the writer, was filled with these notices and devices. A few of the latter are given on this and the next page, as mementoes of the time. The Washington Light Infantry was an old company, and bore the Eutaw flag of the Revolution. The Charleston riflemen was an old company, organized in 1806. The insignia of the Marion Artillery was a copy of White's picture of Marion dining the British officer. That of the Meagher Guard appears to have been made for the occasion — a rude wood-cut, with the words Independence or Death. The title of this company was given in honor of the Irish exile, Thomas F. Meagher, whose honorable course, in serving his adopted country gallantly as a brigadier-general during the civil war that followed, was a fitting rebuke to these unworthy sons of Ireland,
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
lia, from 1757 to 1762, and that of Napoleon in 1806. (See Fig. 1.) Figure I. In the first The manoeuvre of Napoleon upon the Saale in 1806, was combined absolutely in the same manner; hecast an eye over the theatre of the campaign of 1806 and 1807. The Baltic Sea, and the frontiers ofsions had already rejoined him. Napoleon, in 1806, had also the double base of the Main and the Rgn to his masses in 1805, on Donauwerth, and in 1806 on Gera; skillful manoeuvres, which military mealais. In the same manner in the campaign of 1806, if he had marched from Gera straight to Leipziuabia and rich Lombardy, came near perishing in 1806 in the mud of Pultusk, and did perish in 1812 iund Vienna. Napoleon, marching to the war of 1806, formed such reserves on the Rhine; Mortier use Prussians had formed a similar one at Halle in 1806; but it was badly placed; if it had been establsured the success of Napoleon in 1800, 1805 and 1806, by the direction given to his forces upon an e[4 more...]
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 5: of different mixed operations, which participate at the same time of strategy and.of tactics. (search)
order to unite his columns, then the retreat must recommence in the night, in order to regain ground. The third method of retreat, that of following several parallel routes, is very suitable when those routes are sufficiently near to each other. But if they are too far removed apart, each of the wings of the army, separated from the others, might be separately compromised, if the enemy, directing the weight of his forces upon it, obliged it to receive battle. The Prussian army, coming in 1806, from Magdeburg to gain the Oder, furnishes proof of this. The fourth system, which consists in following two concentric routes, is without doubt the most suitable, when the troops are found removed from each other at the moment when the retreat is ordered; nothing is then better than the rallying of one's forces, and the concentric retreat is the only means of succeeding in it. The fifth mode indicated, is nothing else than the famous system of excentric lines, which I have attributed
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
ted all the importance of good logistics: the one is the miraculous assembling of the French army in the plains of Gera in 1806 ; the second is the opening of the campaign in 1815. In both of these events Napoleon knew how to collect together, witnd the most probable chances. I shall allow myself to cite a few examples of them taken in my own experience. When, in 1806, they were yet undecided in France upon the war with Prussia, I made a memoir upon the probabilities of the war, and the oons. His three volumes upon war prove evidently that in a situation like that in which the Duke of Brunswick was found in 1806, he would have been quite as embarrassed as he was as to the course which it was necessary to take. Irresolution must be taff the means of sending agents into Lusace to learn where Napoleon was. General Mack at Ulm and the Duke of Brunswick in 1806 were no better informed; and the French generals in Spain often paid dear for the impossibility of having spies and inform
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
partial detachments, and by the Sepoys whom they disciplined to the number of a hundred and fifty thousand. The Anglo-Russian expedition against Holland, in 1799, was executed by forty thousand men, but by several successive debarkations; it is, nevertheless, interesting from its details. In 1801, Abercrombie, after having disquieted Ferrol and Cadiz, made a descent with twenty thousand English upon Egypt; every one knows the result. The expedition of General Stuart to Calabria, (in 1806,) after some successes at Maida, had to regain Sicily. That against Buenos-Ayres, more unfortunate, was terminated by a capitulation. In 1807, Lord Cathcart made a descent with twenty-five thousand men at Copenhagen, besieged and bombarded it; he took possession of the Danish fleet, the object of his enterprise. In 1808 Wellington made a descent on Portugal with fifteen thousand men. It is known how, victorious at Vimiero, and supported by the insurrection of all Portugal, he forced Ju
arrangements are, in the engagements, as superior as the strategical were in the directions, one battle and the fate of a state is decided. The battle of Jena, in 1806, is an example of this. Or, if a b is our base, c d that of the enemy, we might advance from m to c without fear of being driven from our communications, while ay with the bayonet; if he fails in this attempt and is defeated, he will be forced to surrender. Examples of such operations are the campaigns of 1800, 1805, and 1806. In 1805, Mack, with an Austrian army, near Ulm, was turned by Napoleon, and obliged to capitulate. This result was obtained in consequence of the position and base of the French, (the Rhine,) and that they advance from a to n, and cut the Austrian army, which has advanced in the direction of m, from its base, c d. In 1806, the Prussians were also cut from their communications, obliged to fight at Jena and Auerstadt, front against Prussia; they were defeated, and the remainder of the
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