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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 133 133 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 54 54 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 24 24 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 20 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 16 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 7 7 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1806 AD or search for 1806 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
er-writing, too, had the same defects. The correspondence of friends had the stateliness of a page of history. Mr. Sumner enjoyed the confidence of his party. He was chosen Clerk of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts, for the years 1806-7, and 1810-11. The last two years he was associated with his college friend, Joseph Story, who was the Speaker. Story, on resigning the office, soon after his appointment as Judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, wrote him a letter, sGassett, and Amasa Walker. He had been himself initiated, about 1799, when quite a young man, and had become a master-mason in 1802. A year later he was the eulogist of the order, in a poem and an address before the Grand Lodge of the State. In 1806, however, he discontinued his attendance on its meetings. In 1829, he renounced his connection with it. The same year, he wrote a paper on Speculative Free-Masonry, in the form of a letter to gentlemen who had solicited his views. It was publis
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
to the professor's confidence, and received peculiar help from his severe method of legal investigation. Ashmun insisted always on definiteness of thought and exactness of expression, and was in the habit of testing the knowledge of his favorite pupils by close scrutiny and criticism. This was a healthy discipline for one of Sumner's tastes and habits of study, and he profited much by it. Professor Ashmun was succeeded, in July, by Simon Greenleaf, 1783-1853; practised law in Maine, 1806-1833; professor at Cambridge, 1833-1848. the author of the treatise on The Law of Evidence; the vacancy being filled during the intervening period by James C. Alvord, of Greenfield, a young lawyer of marked ability. Both saw in Sumner a student of large promise, and became at once his friends. Professor Greenleaf's interest in him was hardly second to Judge Story's, and was prolonged after the close of Sumner's connection with the school as pupil or instructor. Judge Story was at first a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
seventeen days since I left New York for Havre in the ship Albany, Captain Johnston. Described in a letter of Sumner to Judge Story, Dec. 25, as a man of science and veracity. My passage had been taken, and my bill on the Rothschilds in Paris obtained, on the 7th December. On that day dined with a pleasant party at Mrs. Ledyard's, Mrs. Susan Ledyard, 53 Crosby Street; a friend of Judge Story, and the daughter of Brockholst Livingston, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1806-23. She died March 7, 1864; surviving her husband, Benjamin Ledyard, more than half a century.— the last dinner of my native land. Left early, called on one or two friends, and spent the residue of the hours before retiring—running far into the watches of the night—in writing letters; saying some parting words to the friends whom I value. And a sad time it was, full of anxious thoughts and doubts, with mingled gleams of glorious anticipations. I thought much of the position which I abando<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ste Biot, 1774-1862. He was one of the most eminent men of the century in mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy. He became a professor at the College of France as early as 1800. In 1804 he ascended in a balloon with Gay-Lussac, and, in 1806, accompanied Arago to Spain on a scientific expedition with which they were charged by the Government. He won fame in authorship as well as by his experiments and discoveries. at the Sorbonne. He is an old gentleman, sixty-five perhaps, full of ste Biot, 1774-1862. He was one of the most eminent men of the century in mathematics, astronomy, and natural philosophy. He became a professor at the College of France as early as 1800. In 1804 he ascended in a balloon with Gay-Lussac, and, in 1806, accompanied Arago to Spain on a scientific expedition with which they were charged by the Government. He won fame in authorship as well as by his experiments and discoveries. Also heard Poisson, Simeon Denis Poisson, 1781-1840; a scientist of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
many literary men. Among the peers I have received great kindness from Lords Wharncliffe(with whom I have dined), Bexley, Fitzwilliam, and Lansdowne. I have just been with Lord Lansdowne Lord Henry Petty, third Marquis of Lansdowne, 1780-1863. He was the son of William, the second Earl of Shelburne (who is honorably identified with the opposition to coercive measures against the American colonists). He became a successful debater in the House of Commons; was Chancellor of the Exchequer, 1806-7; Lord President of the Council, 1830-41 and 1846-52. He was an enlightened statesman; supported the abolition of slavery, and Catholic Emancipation. He was the friend of men of letters,—notably of Macaulay. Henry Wheaton, the publicist, introduced Sumner by letter to Lord Lansdowne. Sumner received attentions at Lansdowne House on his second visit to England, in 1857. in his study; I met him last evening at a party. He had previously been kind enough to call upon me, and presented me w