hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 168 168 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 74 74 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 54 54 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 36 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 17 17 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 556 results in 332 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.), BOOK XVI., CHAPTER II. (search)
f great extent. Some say that it is 1000 stadia in circumference. It stretches along the coast, to the distance of a little more than 200 stadia. It is deep, and the water is exceedingly heavy, so that no person can dive into it; if any one wades into it up to the waist, and attempts to move forward, he is immediately lifted out of the waterSpecific gravity 1ċ211, a degree of density scarcely to be met with in any other natural water. Marcet's Analysis. Philos. Trans. part ii. page 298. 1807. It abounds with asphaltus, which rises, not however at any regular seasons, in bubbles, like boiling water, from the middle of the deepest part. The surface is convex, and presents the appearance of a hillock. Together with the asphaltus, there ascends a great quantity of sooty vapour, not perceptible to the eye, which tarnishes copper, silver, and everything bright—even gold. The neighbouring people know by the tarnishing of their vessels that the asphaltus is beginning to rise, and
Francis Glass, Washingtonii Vita (ed. J.N. Reynolds), EDITOR'S PREFACE. (search)
, it is true, some phrase or expression of rather doubtful origin may intrude, but the intrusion will always be found to carry its own apology along with it, and to be evidently required by the circumstances of the case. And, after all, our author's "Gubernator Dinwiddie," "Dux Knox," "Congressus Americanus," "tormenta ignivoma," "glandes plumbeæ," &c., are certainly no worse than Wyttenbach'sEpist. Select. fasc. 2, p. 31. Where an account is given of the explosion that happened at Leyden, in 1807. "tormentorium unâ explosorum," "patinæ discique dissiliunt," "pulveris pyrii odor," or Addison'sPax Gulielmi auspiciis Europæ reddita.--Musæ Anglicanæ, vol. 11, p. 1. "ferrea grando," and "plumbi densissimus imber." Even the term Tremebundi, applied to the society of Friends, loses nothing, on being compared with the "gens Quackerorum sive Trementium," of Schroeckh.Historia Religionis. Berlin, 1818. Some parts of the work, on the other hand, will, I trust, be found possessed of positive mer<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
to all well-informed naval artillerists. But although constructors of revolving circular gun-platforms for naval purposes, open or covered, have a right to Side elevation of a floating revolving circular tower, published by Abraham Bloodgood in 1807. Floating circular citadel, submitted to the French directory in 1798. employ this ancient device, it will be demonstrated further on that the turret of the monitors is a distinct mechanical combination differing from previous inventions. The in floating batteries. Its machinery is adapted to turn the most ponderous mortars with the greatest ease, according to the position of the enemy. Again, the Transactions of the Society for the Promotion of Useful Arts in the State of New York, 1807, contains an illustration representing a side elevation of a circular revolving floating battery constructed by Abraham Bloodgood. The guns of this battery, as the inventor points out, would be more easily worked than is common, as they would not
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Mr. Lincoln and the force bill. (search)
ion will be passed in two days thereafter. For God's sake, for the country's sake, do not let it pass! Yours, truly, Jos. Segar. Hon. A. R. Boteler, House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. The bill referred to in the foregoing letter had been reported to the House, on the 18th of February, from the Committee on Military Affairs, by its chairman, the Hon. Benjamin Stanton, of Ohio. It extended the provisions of the Act of 1795, for calling forth the militia, and those of the Act of 1807, for the employment of the land and naval forces of the United States, so as not only to place the latter — the regular army and navy-at the disposal of the incoming President, but also to confer on him the plenary power to call out and control the militia, and to authorize him, beside, to accept the services of an unlimited number of volunteers, who should be on the same footing as the regular forces of the United States, and whose officers should all be commissioned by himself. On the
. He was shrewd, adroit, and gifted with a knowledge of what politicians would call good management — a quality or characteristic in which Lincoln was strikingly deficient. He had endorsed the Mexican war, but strangely enough, had lost none of his prestige with the Whigs on that account. The following letter by Butterfield's daughter is not without interest: Chicago, Oct. 12th, 1888. Mr. Jesse W. Weisk. Dear Sir: My father was born in Keene, N. H., in 1790, entered Williams College, 1807, and removed to Chicago in 1835. After the re-accession of the Whigs to power he was on the 21st of June in 1849 appointed Commissioner of the Land Office by President Taylor. A competitor for the position at that time was. Abraham Lincoln, who was beaten, it was said, by the superior dispatch of Butterfield in reaching Washington by the Northern route but more correctly by the paramount influence of his friend Daniel Webster. He held the position of Land Commissioner until disabled by
culiar remedy for such wrongs brings into existence new and unknown classes of offences, or new causes for depriving men of their liberty. It is one of the most material purposes of that writ to enlarge upon bail persons who, upon probable cause, are duly and illegally charged with some known crime, and a suspension of the writ was never asked for in England or in this country, except to prevent such enlargement when the supposed offence was against the safety of the government. In the year 1807, at the time of Burr's alleged conspiracy, a bill was passed in the Senate of the United States, suspending the writ of habeas corpus for a limited time in all cases where persons were charged on oath with treason, or other high crime or misdemeanor, endangering the peace or safety of the government. But your doctrine undisguisedly is, that a suspension of this writ justifies arrests without warrant, without oath, and even without suspicion of treason or other crime. Your doctrine denies th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
with his family and took a house on the Hudson River, whence he reported to the Navy Department as ready for duty. I knew Farragut better than most other officers of the navy knew him; and as he is here to appear as the central figure of the greatest naval achievement of our war, I will give a brief sketch of his early naval life. Farragut was born in Tennessee, from which State his family moved to New Orleans. His father was not a man of affluence, and had a large family to support. In 1807 Captain David Porter, United States Navy, was appointed to the command of the New Orleans station. His father, David Porter, senior (who had been appointed by General Washington a sailing-master in the navy, for services performed during the Revolution), accompanied him to this post and served under his command. Being eighty-four years of age, his services were nominal, and he only lived in New Orleans for the sake of being near his son. One day, while fishing on Lake Pontchartrain, the old
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
eory, and the part which I may have had in it, without saying how I have conceived it myself. As I have said in my chapter of principles, published by itself in 1807, the art of war has existed in all time, and strategy especially was the same under Caesar as under Napoleon. But the art, confined to the understanding of great ience, of which Lloyd and Bulow had first raised the veil, and of which I had indicated the first principles in 1805, in a chapter upon lines of operations, and in 1807, in a chapter upon the fundamental principles of the art of war, printed by itself at Glogau in Silesia. The fall of Napoleon, by giving up many studious office between us. It is extraordinary enough to accuse me of having said that the art of war did not exist before me, when in the chapter of Principles, published in 1807, of which I have before spoken, and which had a certain success in the military world, the first phrase commenced with these words: the art of war has existed from
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
ll have importance relatively to the positions of the two armies already at war. Let us cite an example. In the winter of 1807, Napoleon crossed the Vistula, and ventured under the walls of Konigsberg, having Austria in his rear, and the whole mass ity with his frontiers, is more favorable than the others. It is the situation in which Austria would leave been found in 1807, had she known how to profit from her position; it is also that in which she was found in 1813. Adjacent to Saxony, wheren 1805 and 1809, would probably have taken another turn if Prussia had intervened in them; that of the north of Germany in 1807, depended equally as much upon the cabinet of Vienna. Finally, that of Romelia in 1829, assured by measures of a wise andat least, rendered the struggle long and bloody, by rousing the national pride with the idea of an occupation like that of 1807. But, emboldened by the good reception of all the population, it comprehended that it was an operation more political tha
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
fficient to cast an eye over the theatre of the campaign of 1806 and 1807. The Baltic Sea, and the frontiers of Austrian Gallicia, formed theitions; such were those of Napoleon on the Passarge in the winter of 1807. It is seen then that this denomination may be equally applicableon the Vistula base, which was near compromising the Russian army in 1807. The fate of the Prussian army, thrown back upon the Baltic, after his flanks and rear; Austria could have menaced him at a distance in 1807; but she was in a state of peace with him, and disarmed. In orderngsen came near compromising the Russian armies in basing himself in 1807, upon Konigsberg, because of the facility which that city gave for striment to the enemy. The light detachments made by the Russians in 1807, 1812 and 1813, seriously disturbed the operations of Napoleon, and carefully to meditate. General Beningsen had less disadvantages in 1807, because, combatting between the Vistula and the Niemen, he supporte
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...