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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 168 168 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 74 74 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 54 54 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 36 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 17 17 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1807 AD or search for 1807 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 168 results in 145 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
constitutions were adopted by Massachusetts, including Maine, in 1780, and by New Hampshire in 1783. Gradual abolition was secured by statute in Pennsylvania in 1780, in Rhode Island and Connecticut in 1784, in New York in 1799, and in New Jersey in 1804. Abolition of slavery in the Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi, including the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota, was secured by the Ordinance of 1787. In 1807, Congress passed an act for the abolition of the slave-trade on Jan. 1, 1808. Slavery in part of the Louisiana Purchase, including the present States of Iowa, Oregon, Kansas, Nebraska, part of Colorado, and part of Minnesota, was abolished by the Missouri compromise (q. v..), whose validity was rejected by the Supreme Court (see Dred Scott decision); but the provision for abolition was embodied in the constitutions of these States as they were severally admitted. In course of tine gradual a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolitionists. (search)
. Other abolition societies followed — in Rhode Island in 1786, in Maryland in 1789, in Connecticut in 1790, in Virginia in 1791, and in New Jersey in 1792. These societies held annual conventions, and their operations were viewed by the more humane slave-holders with some favor, since they aimed at nothing practical or troublesome, except petitions to Congress, and served as a moral palliative to the continuance of the practice. The abolition of the African slave-trade by Great Britain in 1807, and by the United States in 1808, came as a great relief to the abolition societies, which had grown discouraged by the evident impossibility of effecting anything in the South, and were now ready to accept this success as the limit of possibility for the present. In 1801, Thomas Jefferson and Gov. James Monroe, of Virginia, had considerable correspondence on the subject of colonizing free blacks outside of the country. In the autumn of 1816, a society for this purpose was organized in Pr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aboville, Francois Marie, Count Da, (search)
Aboville, Francois Marie, Count Da, Military officer; born in Brest, France, in January, 1730; came to America with the rank of colonel during the Revolutionary War, and at the siege of Yorktown commanded Rochambeau's artillery. In 1788 he was commissioned a brigadier-general; in 1792 was commander of the French Army of the North; and in 1807 became governor of Brest with the rank of lieutenant-general. He supported the cause of the Bourbons and after the Restoration was made a peer. He died Nov. 1, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886 (search)
Adams, Charles Francis, 1807-1886 Statesman; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 18, 1807; Charles Francis Adams. son of John Quincy Adams; was graduated at Harvard College in 1825. He accompanied his father to St. Petersburg and England, where he passed much of his childhood until the return of his family to America in 1817. Mr. Adams studied law in the office of Daniel Webster, and was admitted to the bar in 1828, but never practised it as a vocation. In 1829 he married a daughter of Peter C. Brooks, of Boston. For five years he was a member of the legislature of Massachusetts. Having left the Whig Party, he was a candidate of the free-soil party (q. v.) in 1848 for the Vice-Presidency of the United States. Mr. Van Buren being the candidate for the Presidency. They were defeated. In 1850-56 Mr. Adams published the Life and works of John Adams (his grandfather), in 10 volumes. In 1859 he was elected to Congress from the district which his father long represented. He was then a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 (search)
Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 Naturalist; born in Motier parish, near Neuchatel, Switzerland, May 28. 1807. He was of Huguenot descent, was thoroughly educated at Heidelberg and Munich, and received the honorary degree of Ph.D. He prosecuted his studies in natural history in Paris, where Cuvier offered him his collection for the purpose. The liberality of Humboldt enabled him to publish his great work (1834-44) on Fossil fishes, in 5 volumes, with an atlas. He arrived in Boston in 1846, and lectured there Louis Agassiz. on the Animal Kingdom and on Glaciers. In the summer of 1847 the superintendent of the Coast Survey tendered him the facilities of that service for a continuance of his scientific investigations. Professor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He aft
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Albright, Jacob, -1808 (search)
Albright, Jacob, -1808 Clergyman; born near Pottstown, Pa., May 1, 1759. In youth he was a the-burner, but entered the Methodist ministry in 1790. He male many converts, almost exclusively among the Germans, and in 1800 a separate Church organization was formed for them. Albright becoming their first presiding elder. He was appointed bishop in 1807. His denomination is known as the Evangelical Association (q. v.). He died in 1808.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Archibald, 1772- (search)
Alexander, Archibald, 1772- Theologian; born in Augusta (now Rockbridge) county. Va., April 17, 1772; was of Scotch descent, and became teacher in a Virginian family at the age of seventeen years. In 1791 he entered the ministry as an itinerant missionary in his native State. In 1789 he became president of Hampden-Sidney College; left it in 1801; married a daughter of Rev. Mr. Waddell, the celebrated blind preacher in Virginia, and afterwards (1807) became pastor of a Presbyterian church in Philadelphia. In 1810 he was elected president of Union College, Georgia, but did not accept it. On the establishment of the Theological Seminary at Princeton. N. J., in 1811, Dr. Alexander was chosen its first professor, which position he held until his death. Oct. 22, 1851. Among his numerous writings his Outlines of the evidences of Christianity, used as a text-book in several colleges, is most extensively known. It has passed through many editions in various languages.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William Henry, 1784- (search)
Allen, William Henry, 1784- Naval officer; born in Providence, R. I., Oct. 21, 1784; entered the navy as a midshipman in April, 1800, and sailed in the frigate George Washington to Algiers. He afterwards William Henry Allen. went to the Mediterranean in the Philadelphia, under Barron; then in the John Adams, under Rodgers; and in 1804 as sailing-master to the Congress. He was in the Frigate Constitution in 1805; and in 1807 he was third lieutenant of the Chesapeake when she was attacked by the Leopard. It was Lieutenant Allen who drew up the memorial of the officers of the Chesapeake to the Secretary of the Navy, urging the arrest and trial of Barron for neglect of duty. In 1809 he was made first lieutenant of the frigate United States, under Decatur. He behaved bravely in the conflict with the Macedonian; and after her capture took her safely into New York Harbor, Jan. 1, 1813. In July, 1813, he was promoted to master-commandant while he was on his voyage in the brig Angu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alsop, Richard, 1761-1815 (search)
Alsop, Richard, 1761-1815 A witty poet and essayist; born in Middletown, Conn., Jan. 23, 1761. He is best known in literature as the principal author of a series of burlesque pieces, begun in 1791 and ended in 1805, entitled, in collective form, The echo. They were thus published in 1807. Dwight, Hopkins, and Trumbull were associated with Alsop in the production of The echo, which, from a work provocative of mirth, became a bitter political satirist of the Democratic party. He wrote a Monody on the death of Washington, in heroic verse, which was published in 1800. Alsop ranked among the Hartford wits at the close of the eighteenth century. He died in Flatbush, L. L., Aug. 20, 1815.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baldwin, Abraham, 1754-1807 (search)
Baldwin, Abraham, 1754-1807 Legislator; born in Guilford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1754; originated the University of Georgia, and was its president for several years; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1785-88, and a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1787. In 1789-99 he was a Representative in Congress, and was then elected to the United States Senate, of which he was president pro tem. in 1801-02. He died in Washington, D. C., March 4, 1807.
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