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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 168 168 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 74 74 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 54 54 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 36 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 17 17 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7.. You can also browse the collection for 1807 AD or search for 1807 AD in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
one-half for luggage boats, while three miles was the limit at which the passage boats might proceed. Of these latter there were but two, and for a time only one was needed, so little did people journey a century ago. All boats were limited by the Rules, to within a certain size, this made requisite by the locks, while the rafts of logs bound for the ship-yards of Medford, were towed in bands and passed the locks singly. Steam navigation had become an assured fact on the Hudson river in 1807, one year before Mr. Sullivan took charge of the canal, but years before the canal went into operation a steamboat was successfully operated upon the Connecticut river, and its owner and inventor was interviewed by Fulton, who, it seems, only made successful application of the inventions of John Fitch in Delaware and Samuel Morey in New Hampshire, assisted by the wealth of Livingston. Morey, to his dying day, complained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen hi
eon Doggett, who was then preceptor of the academy at Taunton. In a letter to Hannah Swan, Mrs. Rowson refers to Mrs. Gilchrist of Medford. I am told that Mrs. Gilchrist was Susan Wyman, daughter of James Wyman. She was married to James Gilchrist June 10, 1805, and lived in what is called the Train house. Of Fanny Blanchard, Peggy Swan and Sallie Richardson, I have failed to find anything authoritative. In the summer of 1803, Mrs. Rowson moved her school from Medford to Newton; in 1807, to Washington street, and in 1811, to Hollis street, Boston. In 1822, on account of her failing health and declining years, after twenty-five years service, she was forced to withdraw. She died on the second day of March, 1824, at the age of sixty-three years. Mr. Knapp, a contemporary, in an obituary said of her, Mrs. Rowson was singularly fitted for a teacher. Such intelligence as she possessed was then rare among those who took upon themselves the task of forming the characters and enl