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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 155 155 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 37 37 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 31 31 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 24 24 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 22 22 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 18 18 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 12 12 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for 1808 AD or search for 1808 AD in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
out one half of her population, and became at once the subject of a system of plunder and outrage such as no nation, I presume, was ever before subjected to, and which soon brought her to the verge of despair. In the dark and melancholy winter of 1808, when the measure of French power and European suffering were alike full, at a moment when all hope of relief seemed to have fled from the Continent, and Prussia herself to have been marked out as the peculiar object of French vengeance,—at this a was established, obtained, through him, indulgences for Halle. Jerome had confidence in him, and he deserved it, not by becoming a Frenchman, but by remaining faithful to the University, and desiring nothing but its good. He was, therefore, in 1808, made chancellor and rector perpetuus, and soon after knight of the same order that Heyne received. The last honor, of course, vanished with the Westphalian dominion; the chancellorship he retains, but the rectorship he found a burden too great,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
bach, ante alios omnes praestantissimus, but whose health and faculties begin to feel the heavy hand of age,—from all these and from many others I separated myself with a regret which made my departure from Gottingen this morning an hour of sadness and depression. At Cassel I stopped a few hours, and Prof. Welcker, who makes part of my journey with me, carried me to see Volkel,—a man who has made himself rather famous by a treatise on the Olympian Jupiter, and by a little volume, published 1808, on the plundering Greece of its works of art, just at the time Bonaparte had taken everything of this kind from Germany to Paris. . . . . On returning to our lodgings, I took leave of Everett and Stephen Perkins, who had accompanied me thus far, and in the evening came on a few English miles to an ordinary inn. Frankfort, March 29.—The first person I went to see this afternoon was Frederick von Schlegel, and never was I more disappointed in the external appearance of any man in my life; <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
of which he is the head. It is in the Alcazar, or castle, a remarkable building, whose front indicates a great antiquity, and whose ornaments and style are of the richest, most gorgeous Moorish architecture. It was once the residence of the kings of Castile, whose statues in wood, with those of the kings of Oviedo and Leon, from 700 to 1555, are all preserved here. For a long time, however, it was used only as a castle of state, and the last person that was confined here was Escoiquiz, in 1808. . . . . It was Charles III. that established the military school here, where one hundred and thirty-two young men of noble birth are educated for the army. They have eight professors (all officers),. . . . a respectable laboratory, a good philosophical apparatus, and an excellent military library of about twenty thousand volumes. . . . . I am satisfied there is no public institution I have seen in Spain that is established on so good a footing, and so well, regularly, and successfully cond
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
owed the Court here, in the delicious months of the spring. At about half past 9 I entered this neat little city, Aranjuez. built expressly in imitation of a Dutch village. . . . It was originally [the Palace]—I mean in the time of Charles V.—a mere hunting-lodge, and though the succeeding princes gradually enlarged it,. . . . it remained little more than a fine country-house, until Charles IV. Charles V., Emperor of Germany, was Charles I. of Spain. Charles IV. reigned from 1788 to 1808.—who seems to have had a sense for the beauties of nature, though he certainly had it for little else—made it his favorite residence, and added the Casa del Labrador and its immense gardens. The Palace is an ordinary building, but full of pictures. Such Murillos, Velasquez, and Riberas I had never seen, except a few in the Palace and Academy at Madrid; and I was delighted to find that the Marquis de Sta. Cruz had marked them all with his M. for the new Royal Gallery, where they will be,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
m, Edith, has some of his own peculiar rapidity of mind, and Isabella, the fourth, only six years old, who has a bewitching mischievous beauty, which came from I know not where. After dinner he carried me into his study, and spread out a quantity of his literary projects before me,—his Life of Wesley, which is in the press, his Brazil, to be finished in a month, his Spanish War, to which he has prefixed an interesting preface on the moral state of England, France, and Spain, between 1789 and 1808; and, finally, a poem on the War of Philip,— not him of Macedon, but our own particular Philip, recorded by Hubbard and Church,—and as this is more interesting to an American than any other of the works, it is the one I most carefully followed, as he read me all he has written of it. Oliver Newman was left unfinished. Mr. Southey promised Mr. Ticknor the autograph manuscript of this poem when it should have been published, and this promise was remembered and redeemed, after the poet's death<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
of each acquaintance. They are these: Curtis, C. P., from 1793; Everett, E., 1806; Everett, A. H., 1806; Prescott, W. H., 1808; Webster, D., 1808, but also slightly 1802, 1805, 1807; Haven, N. A., 1808; Daveis, C. S., 1809; Gardiner, R. H., 1812; St1808, but also slightly 1802, 1805, 1807; Haven, N. A., 1808; Daveis, C. S., 1809; Gardiner, R. H., 1812; Story, J., 1815; Allston, W., 1819. Others who survive, Curtis, T. B., from 1795; Thayer, S., 1805; Bigelow, J., 1808; Savage, J., 1809; Mason, W. P., 1809; Cogswell, J. G., 1810. Five of these gentlemen outlived him. In his old age he still had frien1808; Daveis, C. S., 1809; Gardiner, R. H., 1812; Story, J., 1815; Allston, W., 1819. Others who survive, Curtis, T. B., from 1795; Thayer, S., 1805; Bigelow, J., 1808; Savage, J., 1809; Mason, W. P., 1809; Cogswell, J. G., 1810. Five of these gentlemen outlived him. In his old age he still had friends whom he had counted as such for sixty years, although he had outlived so many. With regard to two of those intimacies which colored and added interest to his life in the period now opening before him, his own record has already been printed. 1808; Savage, J., 1809; Mason, W. P., 1809; Cogswell, J. G., 1810. Five of these gentlemen outlived him. In his old age he still had friends whom he had counted as such for sixty years, although he had outlived so many. With regard to two of those intimacies which colored and added interest to his life in the period now opening before him, his own record has already been printed. How he came to know and love the charming, earnest, gifted Prescott, his junior by four years, he has told in the memoir which he survived to write; and how he became a constant visitor, and an affectionate admirer of Prescott's parents,—the wise and
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 25: (search)
his Count Thun, then a young man, raised a regiment on his own estates, equipped it, offered it to the government, and commanded it through the campaign of Wagram.. . . . . We had frequent views of the castle, whose enormous size struck me more and more. . .. . I asked the Count how it came to be so vast. He said that anciently the magistrates of the town of Tetschen, who were appointed by the family, had their right of residence within its walls, and that when he came into possession, in 1808, he found five families, with their servants and equipages, regularly established in different parts of it. . . . . So, he added, I built them houses in the town which were so much better, that they were glad to exchange, and the consequence is that I have a larger castle than I want. However, it is full a good many times every year. This I knew already, for they are very hospitable. Last year the Emperor and Empress of Austria, the Emperor and Empress of Russia, the King of Prussia, and t