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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 160 160 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 24 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 23 23 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 22 22 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 22 22 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 17 17 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1809 AD or search for 1809 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Lyman, 1835- (search)
had not yet been welded into a united nation, and were separated from one another not only by time and distance, but by jealousy and rivalry. The union of the States had not passed beyond the experimental stage. The Constitution of the United States was still on trial. All west of the Alleghanies was an untrodden, and for the most part unknown, wilderness. The population, even along the seaboard, was scanty; the cities were few and small; there was no commerce and little manufactures. In 1809 Jefferson presented to the country his ideal on the subject of manufactures and commerce: Manufactures sufficient for our consumption, of what we raise the raw material (and no more) ; commerce sufficient to carry the surplus produce of agriculture beyond our own consumption, to a market for exchanging it for articles we cannot raise (and no more). A vast and little-known and little-travelled ocean separated us from Europe. Under these circumstances to engage in European strifes, to aid Fra
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
olland, England, and Prussia from 1794 to 1801. He received a commission, in 1798, to negotiate a treaty with Sweden. At Berlin he wrote a series of Letters from Silesia. Mr. Adams married Louisa, daughter of Joshua Johnson, American consul at London, in 1797. He took a seat in the Senate of Massachusetts in 1802, and he occupied one in that of the United States from 1803 until 1808. when disagreeing with the legislature of Massachusetts on the embargo question, he resigned. From 1806 to 1809 he was Professor of Rhetoric in Harvard College. In the latter year he was appointed by President Madison minister to Russia; and in 1814, while serving in that office, he was chosen one of the United States commissioners to negotiate a treaty of peace at Ghent. After that, he and Henry Clay and Albert Gallatin negotiated a commercial treaty with Great Britain, which was signed July 13, 1815. Mr. Adams remained in London as minister until 1817, when he was recalled to take the office of Sec
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agricultural societies. (search)
was formed, and in 1791 citizens of New York organized a similar society. In 1792 the Massachusetts Society for promoting Agriculture was organized. These were city institutions, and not composed of practical farmers. They dealt with facts and theories. The majority of husbandmen then did not hear nor heed their appeals for improvements. But finally the more intelligent of that class of citizens became interested, and a convention of practical farmers in the District of Columbia, held in 1809, resulted in the formation of the Columbian Agricultural Society for the Promotion of Rural and Domestic Economy. They offered premiums; and their fair, held in May, 1810, is believed to be the first exhibition of its kind in this country. Elkanah Watson (q. v.) founded the Berkshire (Mass.) Agricultural Society in 1810, and there was a grand Agricultural fair and cattle show at Pittsfield in September, 1811. It was the first of the county fairs held in this country. From that time until
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
ss; and on July 14, 1868, the military relinquished to the civil authorities all legal control. The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the national Constitution were ratified by Alabama, the latter Nov. 16, 1870. Population in 1890, 1,508,073; in 1900, 1,828,697. Governors of the Mississippi Territory. Including the present States of Alabama and Mississippi. Names.Term of office. Winthrop Sargent1799 to 1801 Wm. C. C. Claiborne1801 to 1805 Robt. Williams1805 to 1809 David Holmes1809 to 1817 Governor of the Territory of Alabama. Wm. Wyatt BibbMarch 1817 to Nov. 1819 Governors of the State of Alabama. Wm. Wyatt BibbNov. 1819 to July, 1820 Thomas BibbJuly, 1820 to Nov. 1821 Israel PickensNov. 1821 to Nov. 1825 John MurphyNov. 1825 to Nov. 1829 Gabriel MooreNov. 1829 to Mar. 1831 Saml. B. MooreMar. 1831 to Nov. 1831 John GayleNov. 1831 to Nov. 1835 Clement C. ClayNov. 1835 to July, 1837 Hugh McVayJuly, 1837 to Nov. 1837 Arthur P. BagbyNov. 1837 to Nov. 184
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, Cyrus, 1781-1856 (search)
Alger, Cyrus, 1781-1856 Inventor; born in West Bridgewater, Mass., Nov. 11, 1781; became an iron-founder early in life. In 1809 he founded in Boston the works which since 1817 have been known as the South Boston Iron Company. During the War of 1812 he supplied the government with a large number of cannon-balls. He devised many improvements in the construction of time-fuses for bomb-shells and grenades. In 1811 he invented a method of making cast-iron chilled rolls. and in 1822 designed the cylinder stove. The first perfect bronze cannon. the first gun ever rifled in the United States, and the largest gun of cast-iron, the Columbiad mortar, that had been cast in the country, were turned out at his foundry under his personal supervision. He died in Boston, Feb. 4. 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William Henry, 1784- (search)
He afterwards William Henry Allen. went to the Mediterranean in the Philadelphia, under Barron; then in the John Adams, under Rodgers; and in 1804 as sailing-master to the Congress. He was in the Frigate Constitution in 1805; and in 1807 he was third lieutenant of the Chesapeake when she was attacked by the Leopard. It was Lieutenant Allen who drew up the memorial of the officers of the Chesapeake to the Secretary of the Navy, urging the arrest and trial of Barron for neglect of duty. In 1809 he was made first lieutenant of the frigate United States, under Decatur. He behaved bravely in the conflict with the Macedonian; and after her capture took her safely into New York Harbor, Jan. 1, 1813. In July, 1813, he was promoted to master-commandant while he was on his voyage in the brig Angus, that took W. H. Crawford, American minister, to France. That voyage ended in a remarkable and successful cruise among the British shipping in British waters. After capturing and destroying mo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 (search)
on his retiring Fisher Ames. from office in 1797. After leaving Congress he devoted himself to the practice of his profession; but finally, on account of declining health, gave it up to engage exclusively in agricultural pursuits. In 1804 he was chosen president of Harvard College, but declined the honor. He received the degree of Ll.D. from that institution. His orations, essays, and letters were collected and published in 1 volume, with a biographical sketch by Rev. Dr. Kirkland, in 1809. So powerful was his great speech in Congress in favor of Jay's Treaty, on april 28, 1795, that an opposition member moved to postpone the decision of the question that they might not vote under the influence of a sensibility which their calm judgment might condemn. He died in Dedham, July 4, 1808. Speech on Jay's treaty. The following are extracts from his speech made on April 28, 1796: The treaty is bad, fatally bad, is the cry. It sacrifices the interest, the honor, the indepe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Asphalt, (search)
Asphalt, A solid bituminous substance. probably derived from decayed vegetable matter; used as building material in ancient Babylon. The artificial asphalt from gas-works began to be used as pavement about 1838. Various kinds of asphalt pavement have been since laid in New York, and the leading cities of the United States and Europe. The most celebrated deposit of natural bitumen is on the island of Trinidad, whence the United States obtains its chief supply. although in the calendar year 1809 the United States had an aggregate production of asphalt and bituminous rock of 75.085 short tons, valued at $553,904, the mining being in California. Kentucky, Indian Territory, Oklahoma, Texas. Colorado, and Utah, the principal amount being mined in California.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, Frederick Augustus porter, 1809-1889 (search)
Barnard, Frederick Augustus porter, 1809-1889 Educator; born in Sheffield, Mass., May 5, 1809; was graduated at Yale College in 1828; president of the University of Mississippi in 1856-58, and chancellor in 1858-61. In 1861, on account of the Civil War, he resigned his offices in the university. He was president of Columbia F. A. P. Barnard. College, New York City, in 1864-88. At various times he held responsible appointments under the United States government, and was a member of many scientific and literary societies. He was a strong advocate of the higher education of women, and was instrumental in founding the women's Annex to Columbia College, which afterwards was given his name, and in 1900 was made a part of Columbia University. Among his works are Letters on College government; Report on collegiate education; Art culture; History of the American coast survey; University education; Undulatory Theory of light; Machinery and processes of the industrial Arts, and appar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnes, James, 1866-1869 (search)
Barnes, James, 1866-1869 author: born in Annapolis, Md., Sept. 19, 1866; was graduated at Princeton College in 1891: author Of naval actions of 1812; For King or country; A loyal traitor; Midshipman Farragut, etc. military officer; born in Boston, Mass., about 1809); was graduated at West Point in 1829, and resigned in 1836. He became colonel of a Massachusetts volunteer regiment in 1861, and in November of that year was made brigadier-general in the Army of the Potomac, participating in its most exciting operations. He commanded a division at the battle of Gettysburg, and was severely wounded. He was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865, and was mustered out of the service Jan. 15, 1866. He died in Springfield, Mass., Feb. 12, 1869.
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