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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 177 177 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 16 16 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 14 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 8 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 5 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia.. You can also browse the collection for 1810 AD or search for 1810 AD in all documents.

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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
, nearly four of them being of open trench. Mequinenza (a very small work) in 1810 sustained a siege of more than two weeks. Astorga in 1810 sustained a siege o1810 sustained a siege of thirty days; twenty-four being of open trench. Lerida in 1810 sustained a siege of thirty days, two weeks being of open trench. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1810 sustain1810 sustained a siege of thirty days, two weeks being of open trench. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1810 sustained a siege of two months. Almeida in 1810 sustained a siege of more than a month. Tortosa in 1810 sustained a siege of six months. Tarragona in 1811 sustaine1810 sustained a siege of two months. Almeida in 1810 sustained a siege of more than a month. Tortosa in 1810 sustained a siege of six months. Tarragona in 1811 sustained a siege of nearly two months. Badajos in 1811 sustained a siege of more than forty days open trench. Lerida in 1811 sustained a siege of two weeks open trench1810 sustained a siege of more than a month. Tortosa in 1810 sustained a siege of six months. Tarragona in 1811 sustained a siege of nearly two months. Badajos in 1811 sustained a siege of more than forty days open trench. Lerida in 1811 sustained a siege of two weeks open trench. Saguntum in 1811 sustained a siege of a month. Valencia in 1811-12 sustained a siege of two months. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1812 sustained a blockade of several 1810 sustained a siege of six months. Tarragona in 1811 sustained a siege of nearly two months. Badajos in 1811 sustained a siege of more than forty days open trench. Lerida in 1811 sustained a siege of two weeks open trench. Saguntum in 1811 sustained a siege of a month. Valencia in 1811-12 sustained a siege of two months. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1812 sustained a blockade of several months, and a close siege of two weeks. Badajos in 1812 sustained twenty-one days of open trenches. Burgos in 1812 sustained thirty-three days of open trenches
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
.When built.Repaired fromCost. Vengeance,74--1800 to 1807£84,720 Ildefonso,74--1807 to 180885,195 Scipio,74--1807 to 180960,785 Tremendous,74--1807 to 1810135,397 Elephant,74--1808 to 181167,007 Spencer,7418001809 to 1813124,186 Romulus,74--1810 to 181273,141 Albion,7418021810 to 1813102,295 Donegal,74--1812 to 1815101,367 Implacable,74--1813 to 181559,865 Illustrious,7418031813 to 181674,184 Northumberland,74--1814 to 181559,795 Kent,74--1814 to 181888,357 Sultan,7418071816 to 1811810 to 1813102,295 Donegal,74--1812 to 1815101,367 Implacable,74--1813 to 181559,865 Illustrious,7418031813 to 181674,184 Northumberland,74--1814 to 181559,795 Kent,74--1814 to 181888,357 Sultan,7418071816 to 181861,518 Sterling Castle,74 1816 to 181865,280 This table, although incomplete, gives for the above fifteen ships, during a period of less than twenty years, the cost of timber alone used in their repair, an average of about $400,000 each. More timber than this was used, in all probability, upon the same vessels, and paid for out of the funds appropriated for such as may be ordered in course of the year to be repaired. But the amount specifically appropriated for timber for these fifteen
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 12: army organization—Engineers.—Their history, duties, and organization,—with a brief discussion, showing their importance as a part of a modern army organization. (search)
campaign, and effected the safety of Beresford's corps. Soult destroyed his artillery and baggage, and hastily retreated through the mountain passes; but his army was again arrested at the river Cavado, and placed on the very brink of destruction, when the brave and skilful Dulong succeeded in effecting a passage at the Ponte Nova; the same daring officer opened, on the same day, a way for the further escape of the French across the Misarella by the Saltador. In the pursuit of Massena, in 1810, it was important to the English to cross the Guadiana, and attack the French before Badajos could be put in a state of defence. Beresford was directed by Wellington to pass this river at Jerumina, where the Portuguese had promised to furnish pontons ; but they neglected to fulfil their engagement, and the army had to wait till Capt. Squire, an able and efficient officer of engineers, could construct other means for effecting a passage. Every thing was done that genius could devise and indu
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 13: permanent fortifications.—Historical Notice of the progress of this Art.—Description of the several parts of a Fortress, and the various Methods of fortifying a position (search)
ious, but never much employed in practice. Bousmard, a French emigrant, published in 1799. He adopted the general trace of Vauban, but introduced modifications in the details essentially different from those of Cormontaigne. Some of these modifications are very valuable improvements, while others are of a more character. Bousmard is, on the whole, a very able writer, and his works should be found in the library of every military engineer. Carnot's celebrated treatise was published in 1810. He was evidently a man of genius, and during his career at the head of the War Department of France, numerous and very important improvements were made in the several branches of the military art, and especially in strategy. His work on fortification exhibits much originality and genius, but it is doubtful whether it has very much contributed to the improvement of this art. His ideas have been very severely, and rather unfairly criticized by the English, and particularly by Sir Howard Doug
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 14: field-engineering.—Field Fortifications.—Military Communications.—Military Bridges.—Sapping, Mining, and the attack and defence of a fortified place (search)
lm, in 1800, which for six weeks held in check the victorious army of Moreau; to the intrenched lines of Torres Vedras, in 1810, which saved from destruction the English army of Wellington; to the field-defences of Hougomont, which contributed so mucthe several passages of the Danube, in 1709, by the French and Austrian armies; the passages of the Ta.. gus and Douro, in 1810; by the English ; the passages of the Niemen, the Dwina, the Moskwa, and the Beresina, in 1812, by the French; and of the 9; the operations of the Prince of Orange against Ghent and Bruges, in 1631. ; the passage of the Tagus, at Alcantara, in. 1810, by the English; the bridge constructed across the Zezere, by the French, in 1810; the bridge thrown across the Scarpe, ne1810; the bridge thrown across the Scarpe, near Douai, in 1820; the experiments made at Fere in 1823, &c. The passage of a river in the presence of an enemy, whether acting offensively or in retreat, is an operation of great delicacy and danger. In either case the army is called upon to sho