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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 255 255 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 30 30 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 26 26 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 24 24 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 22 22 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 14 14 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 6 6 Browse Search
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nement, in which the participation of his son probably did not prove a solace. He considered the Americans interlopers, himself a victim, and came out of prison far more bitter in his hostility than hitherto. A merciless beating, which was given to him while hunting on Two Rivers, by the white settlers, who suspected him of theft, rankled all his life. Another reason for his hatred to the Americans he has touchingly related himself. Black Hawk's last service under the British was in 1813, when Major Croghan repulsed the attack on Fort Stephenson made by Colonel Dixon and the British band. Previous to joining Colonel Dixon, Black Hawk had visited the lodge of an old friend, whose son he had adopted and taught to hunt. He was anxious that this youth should go with him and his band to join the British standard, but the father objected on the ground that he was dependent upon his son for game, and, moreover, that he did not wish him to fight against the Americans, who had alway
dings. Gen. Twiggs ordered Major Taylor, in command of the barracks, to proceed immediately to Martello Tower, at the mouth of Bayou Bienvenu, with a company of infantry, to garrison the tower, which contains several heavy mounted guns, for the protection of this avenue to the city. This point is but ten miles from New Orleans in a direct line, and a little over fifteen by the Mexican Gulf Railroad. It is celebrated for being the point at which the British landed their troops in the war of 1813-14.--New Orleans Picayune, June 8. The Tenth Regiment, of New York, arrived at Fortress Monroe.--N. Y. Times, June 9. The tents at Camp McClure, Chambersburg, Pa., were struck at six o'clock A. M., and the line of march taken up soon afterwards for Brown's Mill, near Green Castle, and eight miles distant from Camp McClure. The force in motion was Brig.-Gen. Thomas' command, was headed by him, and included the U. S. Cavalry, (recently from Texas,) 4 companies, the Philadelphia City
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.61 (search)
of a great feat of arms heroically accomplished, it stood ready to renew the struggle with undiminished ardor whenever its commander should give the word. It was one of those magnificent episodes which dignify a nation's history, and are fit subjects for the grandest efforts of the poet and the painter. [Many years ago it was my good fortune, when in. Europe, to make the acquaintance of a charming old Westphalian baron who was aide-de-camp to King Jerome in the days of his prosperity. In 1813 my friend was sent by his king with important dispatches to the Emperor, and, as it happened, arrived while the battle of Lutzen was in progress. He approached from the rear and for miles passed through crowds of stragglers, feeling no doubt that the battle was lost, and that he was about to witness the crushing defeat of the French. Still keeping on and on, he at last found the Emperor at the front, and to his great surprise discovered that the battle was won. Thus it very often happens in
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
. Swan, and taken to Camp Jackson on drays. Reports concerning the matter were contradictory, and the commander resolved to make a personal reconnoissance of the secession camp. Disguised as a woman closely veiled, he rode in a carriage up to and around the camp unsuspected, On that occasion Captain Lyon wore the dress, shawl, and bonnet of Mrs. Andrew Alexander, a daughter of Governor George Madison, of Kentucky, whose bravery was conspicuous at Frenchtown, on the River Raisin, early in 1813. The carriage was driven by William Roberts, a colored man; and Captain J. J. Witzig was Lyon's guide. and was convinced that the time for vigorous action had arrived. Frost had become uneasy, and on the morning of the 10th he wrote to Lyon, saying that he was constantly in receipt of information that an attack on his camp was contemplated, because of the impression that had gone abroad that he was about to attack the Arsenal. Then, with the most adroit hypocrisy, he solemnly declared that
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
d guarding the mouth of the James River. The land troops had fled without informing Tatnall of the movement, and the unfortunate old man, seeing the Navy Yard in flames, and all the works abandoned, could do nothing better than to destroy his ship and fly, for with his best efforts he could not get her into the James River. Sewell's Point and Craney Island, both strongly fortified, were abandoned. Craney Island was much more strongly fortified now for the defense of Norfolk than it was in 1813. See Losing's Pictorial Field-Book of the War of 1812. Captain Case, of the Navy, was the first man to land on the abandoned Island, and to pull down the ensign of rebellion and place the National flag there. The Confederate gun-boats in the James River fled toward Richmond, and the navigation of that stream was opened to the National vessels. Reports of Colonel T. J. Cram and Flag-officer Goldsborough; Narrative of Henry J. Raymond; Letter of General Wool to the author, May 28, 1862. The
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
all one's power, and in proximity with his frontiers, is more favorable than the others. It is the situation in which Austria would leave been found in 1807, had she known how to profit from her position; it is also that in which she was found in 1813. Adjacent to Saxony, where Napoleon had just united his forces, taking in reverse, even the front of the French operations on the Elbe, she put two hundred thousand men in the balance, with almost a certainty of success; the empire of Italy and hhich offers the advantage of diminishing the expenses in time of peace, and of assuring the defense of the country in case of war. This system is nothing else than that employed by France in 1792, imitated by Austria in 1809, and by all Germany in 1813. In view of this I should not have expected the misplaced attacks of which it has been the subject. I shall resume this discussion by affirming that without being an Utopian philanthropist or a condottieri, one can wish that wars of exterminat
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
ook upon the Rhine, to see that those steeps and their counterforts form the only mountains, and that the country, from the sources of the Danube to Donauwerth, presents plains as rich as fertile. The second example, still more recent, dates in 1813; the whole army of Napoleon, and that great captain himself, regarded the interior of Bohemia as a country cut up with mountains, whereas, there exists scarcely one more flat in Europe, as soon as you have crossed the belt of secondary mountains weir capacity, the one taken from among men of acknowledged executive qualities, the other taken from among the best instructed chiefs of the staff. This trinity, if it agree well, can give excellent results, as had place in the army of Silesia in 1813. The same system would be suitable also in the case where the monarch should judge it proper to confide the command to a prince of his house, as has frequently been seen since the time of Louis XIV. The prince was often decorated only with the
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
else than audacious. The base in Bohemia in 1813, proves, as well as all that precedes, in favorel Carion-Nizas, dared even to publish, that in 1813, Napoleon ought to have placed half of his army the commencement of hostilities, at the end of 1813, the general front of operations of Napoleon ex in order to render these ideas more clear. In 1813, after Austria had acceded to the great coalitihended, and this was precisely what happened in 1813. In fact, if Napoleon, victorious at Dresdenchances are equal, and this was not the case in 1813, neither in respect to geographical positions, would have had a good real base on the Elbe, in 1813, if Austria had remained neutral: but this powet of Koenigstein was as useful to the French in 1813, as the vast place of Dresden, because it procuachments made by the Russians in 1807, 1812 and 1813, seriously disturbed the operations of Napoleonf Maurice of Saxony, in 1551, and of Bavaria in 1813, sufficiently proves that it is important to at[3 more...]
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
great risks. At Warsaw the works were formed isolated, but meanwhile of a very respectable relief, and they had for redoubt a great city surrounded with created walls, armed, and defended by a body of desperate men. Dresden had for redoubt in 1813, a bastioned enceinte, but the front of which, already dismantled, had only a field parapet; the camp, properly speaking, was composed only of simple redoubts far removed from each other, and of very incomplete execution, the redoubt alone made ital Paskevitch as to the troops which executed it. Here is an example of what it is suitable to do. With regard to the examples of what it is necessary to shun, we can cite nothing worse than the dispositions prescribed for the attack of Dresden in 1813. Those who were the authors of it could not have done better if they had wished to prevent the taking of the camp; those dispositions may be seen in the work of General Plotho, although they are there already revised and corrected. By the side
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
perate in common with them, either to the right or to the left, but never tracing for them the ensemble of the operations of the whole army. I think that at the passage of the Danube before Wagram, and at the beginning of the second campaign of 1813, Napoleon deviated from his custom by sketching a general order. I have had reason to be convinced that he acted thus systematically, either for covering the ensemble of his combinations by a mysterious veil, or from the fear that orders more gene he was as to the course which it was necessary to take. Irresolution must be the accompaniment of minds which doubt everything. Returning to our subject I must confess that espionage has been singularly neglected in many modern armies, and in 1813 among others the staff of the Prince of Schwartzenburg not having a sou at its disposition for this service, the Emperor Alexander had to furnish funds from his chest to give to that staff the means of sending agents into Lusace to learn where Nap
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