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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 36 36 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 29 29 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 28 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1814 AD or search for 1814 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abert, John James, 1778-1863 (search)
Abert, John James, 1778-1863 Military engineer; born in Shepherdstown, Va., Sept. 27, 1778: was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1811; soon afterwards resigned; studied law, and was admitted to the bar; served as a private soldier in the defence of the national capital in the War of 1812, and in 1814 was re-appointed to the army as a topographical engineer, becoming chief of the corps in 1838. He was associated with the construction of many of the early national works of engineering, and was one of the organizers of the National Institute of Science, which was merged into the Smithsonian Institution. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 27, 1863.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Hannah, 1755-1831 (search)
house before she had arrived at full womanhood. Her father, a shopkeeper, failed in business when she was seventeen years of age, and his children were compelled to help themselves. During the war for independence she supported herself by teaching and lace-making. Miss Adams wrote a History of the Jews, in which she was assisted by the Abbe Gregoire, with whom she corresponded. She also wrote a History of New England, published in 1799. She also wrote hooks on religious subjects; and, in 1814, published a Controversy with Dr. Morse (Rev. Jedidiah). Her autobiography, continued by Mrs. G. G. Lee, was published in 1832. Miss Adams was small in stature, very deaf in her old age, fond of strong tea, and an inveterate snuff-taker. She derived very little pecuniary gains from her writings; but her friends established a comfortable annuity for her. She was one of the pioneer literary women of the United States, possessing rare modesty and great purity of character. She died in Brookli
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
a series of Letters from Silesia. Mr. Adams married Louisa, daughter of Joshua Johnson, American consul at London, in 1797. He took a seat in the Senate of Massachusetts in 1802, and he occupied one in that of the United States from 1803 until 1808. when disagreeing with the legislature of Massachusetts on the embargo question, he resigned. From 1806 to 1809 he was Professor of Rhetoric in Harvard College. In the latter year he was appointed by President Madison minister to Russia; and in 1814, while serving in that office, he was chosen one of the United States commissioners to negotiate a treaty of peace at Ghent. After that, he and Henry Clay and Albert Gallatin negotiated a commercial treaty with Great Britain, which was signed July 13, 1815. Mr. Adams remained in London as minister until 1817, when he was recalled to take the office of Secretary of State. This was at the beginning of what was popularly known as the era of good feeling. the settlement of questions growing ou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ira, 1751-1814 (search)
Allen, Ira, 1751-1814 Military officer; a younger brother of Ethan; born in Cornwall, Conn., April 21, 1751. He was an active patriot, and took a distinguished part in public affairs in Vermont, his adopted State, where he served in the legislature, and was secretary of state, surveyor-general, and a member of the council. He was a military leader in the war for independence, and was one of the commissioners sent to Congress to oppose the claims of neighboring provinces to jurisdiction in Vermont. He effected an armistice with the British in Canada in 1781, and by so doing brought about a settlement of the controversy with New York. As senior major-general of the State militia in 1795, he went to Europe to purchase arms for his commonwealth, and on his way homeward with muskets and cannon he was captured, taken to England, and charged with being an emissary of the French, and intending to supply the Irish malcontents with arms. After long litigation the matter was settled in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armstrong, John, 1758-1843 (search)
orthwestern Territory, but he declined. Two years later he married a sister of Chancellor Livingston, removed to New York, purchased a farm within the precincts of the old Livingston Manor on the Hudson, and devoted himself to agriculture. He was a member of the national Senate from 1800 to 1804, and became United States minister at the French Court in the latter year, succeeding his brother-in-law, Chancellor Livingston. He was commissioned a brigadier-general in July, 1812, and in January, 1813, became Secretary of War in the cabinet of President Madison. His lack of success in the operations against Canada, and at the attack upon and capture of Washington in 1814, made him so unpopular that he resigned and retired to private life. He died at Red Hook. N. Y., April 1, 1843. General Armstrong wrote Notes on the War of 1812, and Lives of Generals Montgomery and Wayne for Sparks's American biography; also a Review of Wilkinson's memoirs, and treatises on agriculture and gardening.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, (search)
here. On the 22d, Governor Hicks was induced to send a message to the President, advising him not to order any more troops across the soil of Maryland, and to send away some who were already at Annapolis. The President replied kindly but firmly. He reminded his Excellency that the route of the troops across that State chosen by the general-in-chief was farthest removed from populous towns, and said: The President cannot but remember that there has been a time in the history of our country [1814] when a general [Winder, of Maryland] of the American Union, with forces designed for the defence of the capital, was not unwelcome anywhere in the State of Maryland, and certainly not at Annapolis, then, as now, the capital of that patriotic State; and then, also, one of the capitals of the Union. Governor Hicks had also unwisely recommended the President to refer the matter in dispute between the national government and Maryland to Lord Lyons, the British minister at Washington. To this p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bates, Edward, 1793- (search)
Bates, Edward, 1793- Statesman; born in Belmont, Va., Sept. 4, 1793; served in the Virginia militia in 1813; removed to Missouri in 1814; and began practising law in 1816. He was a prominent anti-slavery man, and during the National Republican Convention of 1860( he received 48 votes on the first ballot for President. Mr. Lincoln after his election appointed Mr. Bates Attorney-General. He resigned in 1864, and returned to his home in St. Louis, where he died. March 25, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, Charles H., 1798-1875 (search)
Bell, Charles H., 1798-1875 Naval officer; born in New York, Aug. 15, 1798; entered the naval service in June, 1812; served with Decatur in 1813-14; with Chauncey, on Lake Ontario, in 1814; and with Decatur again, in the Mediterranean, in 1815. He was with the squadron in the West Indies (1824-29) operating against the pirates there. In 1860 he was in command of the Norfolk navy-yard: commanded the Pacific squadron in 1862-64, and the navy-yard at Brooklyn 1865-68. In July, 1866, he was . 15, 1798; entered the naval service in June, 1812; served with Decatur in 1813-14; with Chauncey, on Lake Ontario, in 1814; and with Decatur again, in the Mediterranean, in 1815. He was with the squadron in the West Indies (1824-29) operating against the pirates there. In 1860 he was in command of the Norfolk navy-yard: commanded the Pacific squadron in 1862-64, and the navy-yard at Brooklyn 1865-68. In July, 1866, he was made a rear-admiral. he died in New Brunswick, N. J., Feb. 19, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, John, -1869 (search)
Bell, John, -1869 Statesman; born near Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 15, 1797; was graduated at Cumberland College (now the University of Nashville) in 1814, and studied law in Franklin, Tenn. In 1817 he was elected to the State Senate. After the expiration of his term he practised law till 1827, when he was elected to Congress. he served in the House of Representatives till 1841 by re-elections. After abandoning his free-trade views, he became one of the founders of the Whig party (q. v.), and was elected speaker of the House of Representatives in 1834. President Harrison appointed him Secretary of War in 1841, but he resigned with other members of the cabinet (excepting Daniel Webster) when President Tyler left the Whig party. In 1847-59 he was a member of the United States Senate, and in 1860 he was the unsuccessful candidate of the constitutional Union party (q. v.) for President, with Edward Everett for Vice-President. He died in Cumberland, Tenn., Sept. 10, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bellows, Henry Whitney, 1814- (search)
Bellows, Henry Whitney, 1814- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 11, 1814. Educated at Harvard and the Divinity School at Cambridge, he was ordained pastor of the first Unitarian Church in New York City in January, 1838. he remained its pastor Henry Whitney Bellows, D. D. until his death, Jan. 30, 1882. He was the projector of the Christian inquirer, in 1843, and he occupied from the beginning a conspicuous place in the pulpit, in letters, and in social life, wielding great influence for good. Dr. Bellows was one of the originators of the United States Sanitary commission (q. v.), which performed such prodigious benevolent work during the late Civil War. He was president of the Commission from the beginning. Besides numerous pamphlets and published discourses. Dr. Bellows was the author of a collection of sermons on Christian doctrine, published in 1869; and later he gave a picturesque account of a European tour in 1868-69, in 2 volumes, entitled The old world in its New face
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