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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 303 303 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 27 27 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 16 16 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 15 15 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 14 14 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 13 13 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for 1815 AD or search for 1815 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
ishing to pass a stone bridge, should cause it to be visited by carpenters and architects, and that Darius would not have been conquered if, instead of opposing all his forces to Alexander, he had fought him with but the half! Astonishing maxim of military policy. Maizeroy has had some ideas quite as vague, in what he calls the dialetics of war. Lloyd has gone fartherest into the question; but how much his work leaves to be desired, and how much it has been belied by the events from 1792 to 1815! Although this belongs more especially to the science of the statesman, than to that of the warrior, since we have imagined to separate the gown from the sword, it cannot be denied, however, that if it be useful to a subaltern general, it is indispensable to every general-in-chief of an army: it enters into all the combinations which can determine a war, and into those of the operations which may be undertaken; hence it belongs necessarily to the science of which we treat. From these consi
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
nd Legnano, to watch the Adige, those which he had in 1813 in Saxony and in Silesia in advance of his line of defense, were strategical positions, as well as those of the Anglo-Prussian armies on the frontier of Belgium before the battle of Ligmy (1815), and that of Massena upon the Albis, along the Limmat and the Aar in 1799. Even winter quarters when they are very compact and placed in front of the enemy without being guarantied by an armistice, are nothing else than strategic positions; suchses, whose affections he lost for the rest by the ravages inseparable from great wars and by the sacrifices of the continental system much more than by his antipathy for radical doctrines. As for what concerns France, he learned to his cost, in 1815, that it is dangerous to count upon political theories as upon a certain element of success; for if they are proper for raising storms, they could not direct their effect: his liberal homilies, insufficient for unchaining the popular masses, had n
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
duty to refer to some remarkable events in order to cause to be appreciated all the importance of good logistics: the one is the miraculous assembling of the French army in the plains of Gera in 1806 ; the second is the opening of the campaign in 1815. In both of these events Napoleon knew how to collect together, with an admirable precision, upon the decisive point of the zone of operations, his columns which had departed from the most divergent points. The choice of this decisive point en, when no person in the army, nor in Germany, conceived anything of those movements in appearance so complicated. I except, however, a small number of officers capable of penetrating them by analogy with precedents. In the same manner, in 1815, when Blucher cantoned peaceably between the Sambre and the Rhine, and Wellington gave or received fetes at Brussels, both awaiting the signal to invade France, Napoleon, whom they believed at Paris quite occupied with ostentatious political cerem
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
the battalions should have 1000 men. how much this question of the best formation is subordinate to the strength of the army, and how complicated it is. We can scarcely be regulated now a days, by the enormous masses put in action from 1812 to 1815, where we have seen one army form fourteen corps which had from two to five divisions. With such forces, it is incontestable that nothing can be imagined better than an organization by army corps of three divisions; eight of these corps would be r than such or such another formation. Meanwhile, when we can unite these two advantages, we are only the more sure of conquering, and nothing could legitimize the adoption of a mode recognized as vicious. The history of the late wars (1812 to 1815) has renewed also ancient controversies for deciding if cavalry fighting in line can triumph in the long run over irregular cavalry, which avoiding all serious engagement flies with the speed of the Parthian, and returns to the combat with the sam
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
sion passed the gulf at Umeo, (March, 1809.) General Murray made, in 1813, a well combined descent near Tarragona to cut off Suchet from Valencia; however; after some successes, he was obliged to re-embark. The armament which England made in 1815 against Napoleon, returned from the island of Elba, was remarkable for the immense materiel which it debarked at Ostend and Antwerp. The troops amounted also to sixty thousand Anglo-Hanoverians; but the one came by land, and the others landed on the soil of a powerful ally, so that it was a successive and pacific descent rather than a military expedition. Finally, the English made, in the same year, 1815, an enterprise which may be ranked among the most extraordinary; we allude to that against the capital of the United States of America. There was seen, to the astonishment of the world, ahandful of seven or eight thousand English, descend in the midst of a State of ten millions of souls, to penetrate sufficiently far to seize the ca