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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 303 303 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 27 27 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 16 16 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 15 15 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 14 14 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 13 13 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 12 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1815 AD or search for 1815 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
ldren, viz., Hannah (1765-1843), In the church records of the parish of Byfield, Newbury, Mass., this entry is found among the baptisms: Hannah. Daut'r of Joseph Garrison of St. John's River in Nova Scotia but his wife a member of ye Chh here with her Child June 15, 1766. The last sentence, if punctuated thus, as it doubtless should be—but his wife, a member of the church, here with her child—is evidence of a visit of Mary Garrison to her old home at the date mentioned., Elizabeth (1767– 1815), Joseph (1769-1819), Daniel (1771-1803), Abijah (born 1773), Sarah (born 1776), Nathan (1778-1817), Silas (1780-1849), William (a posthumous child, 1783– 1837). The fifth in order, Abijah, must occupy our attention, to the exclusion of his brothers and sisters. The exact date of his birth was June 18, 1773, and the place Jemseg. He was named for his uncle Palmer. Except the romantic incident of his babyhood, already related, his early history is a blank. He alone of the family followed
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
one from which she never recovered, and it shadowed the remaining years of her life. The struggle for existence became a severe and bitter one. The day of Newburyport's prosperity had passed. and the years of the Embargo and of the war of 1812-15 brought disaster and ruin to its business and commerce. It was no easy matter, therefore, to find the remunerative employment which would feed so many months. The little house in School Street still afforded them shelter, thanks to the sisterly disit to her old home at Granville, Nova Scotia, taking Lloyd with her; but he was too young to remember anything but the Indians whom he then saw, and who came to his aunt's house with their pappooses slung upon their backs. During the war of 1812-15, she removed to Lynn to pursue her vocation, taking James, her favorite son, a boy of much beauty and promise, with her, that he might learn the trade of shoemaking. Elizabeth was left in Mrs. Farnham's protecting care, while Lloyd went to live wi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
lavery as it now exists in our country; and I earnestly hope you will find encouragement to resume it and to give it a wide circulation. I am with esteem Yr. obt. servant, Arthur Tappan. Arthur Tappan (1786-1865), a native of Northampton, Mass., began his business career in Portland, Me., in 1807, removing thence in 1809 to Montreal, where he prospered until the War of 1812 destroyed his business and compelled him to leave Canada at a great sacrifice. Establishing himself in New York in 1815, he succeeded eventually in building up a large and profitable silk trade, and became one of the best-known merchants in the country, whose name was a synonym for uprightness. A man of the most simple tastes and frugal habits, he gave lavishly of his fortune to aid the religious and philanthropic movements of the day, and contributed tens of thousands of dollars to the support of the Tract and Bible Societies, theological seminaries, and various educational and reformatory efforts. His early
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
, p. 14 of Proceedings of the Am. A.-S. Society at its Third Decade. The Letters had that Scriptural pungency which Lib. 1.1, and Mss. Sept. 13, 1830, July 11, 1831, to E. Dole. Mr. Garrison found lacking in Evan Lewis's Editor of a Quaker anti-slavery journal called the Advocate of Truth. prize tract on The Duties of Ministers and Churches of all Denominations to avoid the Stain of Slavery, etc., but which so abounded in the Rev. George Bourne's The book and slavery Irreconcilable (1815), to which, next after the Bible itself, Mr. Garrison confessed his indebtedness for his views of the institution. Like Rankin, Osborn, and other early emancipationists, Bourne had seen slavery face to face (in Virginia). For tributes to his zeal and courage from Garrison and Lundy, see Lib. 2.35, 43, 133; 3.182. Perhaps no sight was more gratifying to him than that of a minister of the gospel appealing to the Book against African bondage. For this he could overlook theological differenc