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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 236 236 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 30 30 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 27 27 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 23 23 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 18 18 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 9 9 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 8 8 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1816 AD or search for 1816 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ind the throne greater than the throne. Upon Tindal devolves the decision of all interlocutory matters in his court,—the other judges seldom interposing with regard to them, or, indeed, appearing to interest themselves about them. He is one of the kindest men that ever lived. Next to Tindal is old James Allan Park, 1763-1838. He was born in Edinburgh; published, in 1787, a work on The Law of Marine Insurance; was elected Recorder of Durham in 1802; and was a Judge of the Common Pleas, 1816-1838. the oldest judge on the bench, and who, it is reported, is now at the point of death. He has been some fifty-eight years at the bar and on the bench; is a staunch Tory, and a believer in the divinity of wigs. He dislikes Campbell, the Attorney-General; interrupts counsel very much, and has some of the petulance of age. There are a thousand amusing stories about him, which the lawyers tell at dinner to illustrate his rather puritanical character. Then comes Vaughan. Ante, Vol. I. p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
Barry Cornwall, who is very simple in his tastes and habits, thinks D'Orsay a very remarkable person. Both he and Lady Blessington offered me letters for Italy. Into the moral character of these persons I do not enter, for I know nothing. Lady Blessington is never received anywhere; but she has about her Lords Wellesley, Lyndhurst, Brougham, Durham, &c., and many others less known on our side of the sea. You may suppose that I made no advance to Bulwer Sir Edward George Lytton Bulwer, 1816-73. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. or Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, author and statesman, born in 1805, and twice Prime-Minister of England. and we did not exchange words. An evening or two afterwards I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat nex
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
Barry Cornwall, who is very simple in his tastes and habits, thinks D'Orsay a very remarkable person. Both he and Lady Blessington offered me letters for Italy. Into the moral character of these persons I do not enter, for I know nothing. Lady Blessington is never received anywhere; but she has about her Lords Wellesley, Lyndhurst, Brougham, Durham, &c., and many others less known on our side of the sea. You may suppose that I made no advance to Bulwer Sir Edward George Lytton Bulwer, 1816-73. He was raised to the peerage as Baron Lytton in 1866. or Disraeli, Benjamin Disraeli, author and statesman, born in 1805, and twice Prime-Minister of England. and we did not exchange words. An evening or two afterwards I sat opposite Bulwer at dinner. It was at my friend Milnes's, where we had a small but very pleasant company,—Bulwer, Macaulay, Hare Francis George Hare, 1786-1842; eldest brother of Augustus and Julius Hare. (called Italian Hare), O'Brien, and Monteith. I sat nex
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
a week or fortnight, I shall leave here,—make a rapid course (we fly by night) to Heidelberg; then down the Rhine to Cologne; then to Brussels, Antwerp, London,—where I shall be at the end of January,—thence to sail for America. If this letter reaches you by the British Queen, do not fail to write me by the return. Give my love to all my friends; and tell them I shall soon see them. As ever, affectionately yours, C. S. P. S. Cogswell Dr. Joseph Green Cogswell, 1786-1871. He was in 1816 a student at Gottingen with Edward Everett and George Ticknor; in 1823, with George Bancroft, established the Round Hill School at Northampton, Mass., and in 1848 became the Superintendent of the Astor Library. has just arrived at Dresden. I have not seen him; but he speaks of Hyperion as one of the best books that has ever come from our country. To George W. Greene. Berlin, Dec. 30, 1839. dear Greene,—Would I were with you in Rome! Every day I chide myself because I was so idle and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
es. The list of orators includes some who have left an enduring memory; but conspicuous by their absence from it are the names of Webster and Choate. Sometimes a veteran orator has been summoned from his retirement, as Mr. Everett in 1860, and Mr. Winthrop in 1876,—each speaking with undiminished vigor, and adding another to his many triumphs. But generally, from the early period to the present, young men under thirty or thirty-five have been selected for the service. John Adams wrote in 1816 of these orations Letter to Dr. J. Morse, 5 January, 1816. Works of John Adams, Vol. X. pp. 203, 204:— The town of Boston instituted an annual oration in commemoration of this catastrophe [ the battle of King Street, on the 5th of March, 1770 ], upon the danger of standing armies stationed in populous cities in time of peace, and among the first orators were such names as Hancock, Warren, and Lovell. These orations were read, I had almost said by every body that could read, and s