hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 197 197 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 23 23 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 21 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 18 18 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 9 9 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 7 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1818 AD or search for 1818 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 197 results in 177 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Joel, 1793-1855 (search)
: born in Westford, Mass., Jan. 18, 1793; entered the navy as midshipman at the beginning of the War of 1812: served first on the frigate President, and next on Lake Champlain with Commodore Macdonough, who when he asked Abbot if he were ready to die for his country received the reply: Certainly, sir; that is what I came into the service for. He was then ordered to enter the British lines as a spy and destroy a number of spars which had been stored at Sorel. For his success in this dangerous exploit and for his bravery in the engagement at Cumberland Head on Sept. 11, 1814, he received a sword of honor from Congress and was commissioned a lieutenant. He was given charge of the pirate ship Mariana in 1818; promoted commander in 1838; and in the following year was given command of the Boston navy-yard. During Commodore Perry's expedition to Japan in 1852 Abbot commanded the Macedonian, and later was appointed flag-officer of the squadron. He died in Hong-Kong, China, Dec. 14, 1855.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agnew, David Hayes, 1818-1892 (search)
Agnew, David Hayes, 1818-1892 Anatomist and author: born in Lancaster county, Pa., Nov. 24, 1818: was graduated at the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1838; became professor in the Philadelphia School of Anatomy; demonstrator of anatomy in the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, and surgeon at the Pennsylvania and the Orthopaedic hospitals, all in Philadelphia. During the Civil War he became widely known as a daring and successful operator in cases of gunshot wounds. After the war he was elected Professor of Operative Surgery and of the Principles and Practice of Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Agnew was the consulting and operating surgeon in the case of President Garfield in 1881. Among his numerous publications are Practical Anatomy; Anatomy and its relation to medicine and Surgery; and The principles and practice of Surgery. He died in Philadelphia, March 22, 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrew, John Albion, 1818-1867 (search)
Andrew, John Albion, 1818-1867 War governor of Massachusetts: was born in Windham, Me., May 31, 1818: was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1837, and became conspicuous as an anti-slavery advocate. He was chosen governor of Massachusetts, in 1860, by the largest popular vote ever cast for any candidate for that office. Foreseeing a conflict with the Confederates, he took means to make the State militia efficient; and, within a week after the President's call for troops, he sent five regiments of infantry, a battalion of riflemen, and a battery of artillery to the assistance of the government. He was active in raising troops during the war and providing for their comfort. An eloquent orator, his voice was very efficacious. He was reelected in 1862, and declined to be a candidate in 1864. He died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 30, 1867.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbuthnot and Ambrister, case of, (search)
Florida from New Providence in his own schooner in 1817, to trade with the Indians, Ambrister, born in London in 1785, was a lieutenant in the English marine service, and was present at the battle of Waterloo. For fighting a duel with a brother officer he was suspended for one year. While with his uncle, the governor of New Providence, he met Arbuthnot, with whom he visited Florida. Here it was alleged they became implicated in Indian difficulties that General Jackson was sent to quell in 1818. By order of General Jackson, Arbuthnot and Ambrister were seized and tried by a military court, convened April 26, 1818, at Fort St. Marks, Fla., Gen. Ed. P. Gaines, president, for inciting the Creek Indian to war against the United States. Ambrister made no defence, but threw himself on the mercy of the court. Arbuthnot was sentenced to be hanged. Ambrister was first sentenced to be shot, but his sentence was commuted to fifty stripes on the bare back, and confinement at hard labor, wit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bache, Hartman, 1798-1872 (search)
Bache, Hartman, 1798-1872 Engineer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 3, 1798; was graduated at West Point in 1818, and while in the army served continuously as a topographical engineer, on surveys for harbor and river improvements, coast defence, roads, and canals. On March 3, 1865, he was promoted to brigadier-general, the highest rank in the engineer corps, and in 1867 was retired. His most important engineering works were the construction of the Delaware breakwater and the successful application of iron screw-piles in the building of foundations of light-houses upon coral-reefs and sandy shoals. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 8, 1872.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barron, James, 1769-1851 (search)
h France. In 1799 he was made a captain and sent to the Mediterranean, under the command of his elder brother, Com. Samuel Barron, one of the best disciplinarians in the service. James was in command of the frigate Chesapeake in 1807, and surrendered her to the Leopard, a British ship-of-war, for which he was court-martialled and sentenced to be suspended from service for five years without pay or emoluments. During that suspension he entered the merchant service, and remained abroad until 1818, when an attempt was made to restore him to duty in the naval service. Commodore Decatur and other officers resisted this, and a bitter correspondence between Barron and Decatur ensued. James Barron. Barron challenged his antagonist to fight a duel. They met near Bladensburg (March 22, 1820), and Decatur was mortally wounded. Barron was severely hurt, but recovered after several months of suffering. During the latter years of his long life Barron held several important commands on sho
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bloomer, Amelia Jenks, 1818-1894 (search)
Bloomer, Amelia Jenks, 1818-1894 Reformer; born in Homer, N. Y., May 27, 1818; married Dexter C. Bloomer, of Seneca Falls, N. Y., in 1840; and began the publication of The Lily. devoted to woman's rights, prohibition, etc., in 1849. Me. and Mrs. Bloomer moved to Council Bluffs, Ia., in 1855, and she then lectured in the principal cities of the country . She recommended and wore a sanitary dress for women which became known as the Bloomer costume, although it was originated by Mrs. Elizabeth Smith Miller. It consisted of skirts reaching just below the knee and Turkish trousers. She died in Council Bluffs, Ia., Dec. 30, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boutwell, George Sewall, 1818- (search)
Boutwell, George Sewall, 1818- Statesman; born in Brookline, Mass., Jan. 28, 1818; the son of a farmer; studied law, but never practised it, turning his attention to polities. He was seven times chosen to a seat in the Massachusetts legislature, and became the leader of the Democratic party in his State. In 1850 he was chosen governor of Massachusetts, and was re-elected in 1852. In 1862 he was elected to Congress, and was twice re-elected. He was one of the managers of the impeachment of President Johnson, and was Secretary of the Treasury from 1869 to 1873, when he became a member of the United States Senate, his term ending in 1879. He published Educational topics and institutions; his most important work, The Constitution of the United States at the end of the first century; and several works on taxation and political economy.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brickett, James, 1737-1818 (search)
Brickett, James, 1737-1818 Military officer: born in 1737; was a physician in Haverhill, Mass., until the beginning of the French and Indian War; was a surgeon in the army at Ticonderoga; was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill; appointed brigadier-general in the expedition designed for Canada in 1776; and commanded the American escort of Burgoyne's surrendered army from the Saratoga battle-field to Cambridge, Mass., in 1777. He died in Haverhill. Mass., Dec. 9, 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 1818-1893 (search)
Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 1818-1893 Lawyer and soldier; born in Deerfield, N. H., Nov. 5, 1818; was graduated at Waterville College, Me., in 1838: was admitted to the bar in 1841; and continued the practice until 1861, with a high reputation as a criminal lawyer. He was an active politician in the Democratic party until its Benjamin Franklin Butler. disruption at Charleston in 1860; and he had served as a member of both Houses of the Massachusetts legislature. As brigadier-general of1818; was graduated at Waterville College, Me., in 1838: was admitted to the bar in 1841; and continued the practice until 1861, with a high reputation as a criminal lawyer. He was an active politician in the Democratic party until its Benjamin Franklin Butler. disruption at Charleston in 1860; and he had served as a member of both Houses of the Massachusetts legislature. As brigadier-general of militia he hastened towards Washington, on the call of the President, with troops, in April, 1861, and landed at Annapolis. He was placed in command of the Department of Annapolis, which included Baltimore (q. v.). At the middle of May he was made major-general of volunteers, and put in command of the Department of Virginia, with headquarters at Fort Monroe, where he held as contraband all fugitive slaves. In August (1861), an expedition which he commanded captured forts Hatteras and Clarke;
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...