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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 197 197 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 23 23 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 21 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 18 18 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 15 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for 1818 AD or search for 1818 AD in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
ted States, etc., etc.; said she did not like liberals in Europe, but that it was another thing in America, where the government was democratic, and it was a man's duty to be liberal; and so on, and so on. Other persons came in, and I was presented to the Minister at War, Count Hardegg; the Minister of Police; Bodenhausen, the Minister from Hanover; Steuber, the Minister from Hesse Cassel; and some others whose names I did not catch. I found there, too, Count Bombelles, whom I had known in 1818, as Austrian Charge d'affaires at Lisbon, See Vol. I. pp. 246, 247. and who is now a great man in a very agreeable office here, that of governor of the young archdukes, who are the heirs presumptive, as the Emperor has no children; a sinecure office thus far, since the eldest is not seven years old. He has married an English wife, talks English admirably, and was very agreeable. There were no ladies present except a Russian princess and her daughter. By half past 10 o'clock there were p
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
, that Burr made offers to the French government to divide the United States, and bring the Valley of the Mississippi under French control. Talleyrand told me, in 1818, that the offer was made to himself; and Laharpe was in Paris, and used to see Burr occasionally at the time he was there, but says he was never looked upon with fuse, so that I shall hardly see much of him. September 30.—This forenoon I had a long and very agreeable visit from Count Cesare Balbo, whom I knew very well in 1818 at Madrid, where his father was Sardinian Minister. He has had very various fortunes since I saw him last,—was exiled in 1821, for some part he took in the affairn about electricity, etc. The Count is nearly eighty years old, and much broken in his physical strength, but his mind is as clear and active as when I knew him in 1818. October 5.—I went over the University this morning with the Abbe Gazzera, where I saw nothing worth recollecting, but a good library of 140,000 volumes, with a<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
time, three days. To-morrow he is to have an operation performed, and when he is sufficiently recovered will go to the South of France. It is a great pain to see him so different from what he was when I knew him at Milan in 1817, and at Paris in 1818-19. The Austrian government seems to have succeeded. It has crushed him, broken his spirit, broken his heart; and his nature was so noble and lofty that it seems as if tyranny were encouraged and strengthened, by his present condition, to proceetitle of one of the Tales of Fashionable Life, by Miss Edgeworth, which is founded on incidents of Madame de Pastoret's experience. M. de Pastoret received the title of Marquis from Louis XVIII. She is, of course, much altered since I knew her in 1818-19; but she is well, and able to devote herself, as she always has done, to works of most faithful and wise charity. Her fortune, and that of her family, is large; but being Carlists, and sincerely and conscientiously so, they gave up offices in
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
set up there a sort of hospice, where he supports twelve poor men and twelve poor women, in extreme old age; not, indeed, out of his own means, but by an annual contribution which he levies every year, far and wide, even in the palace of the abominated Louis Philippe. He received me kindly in his study, which did not seem very comfortable, but which contained a superb copy of a Holy Family, by Mignard, given to him by the late Duchess de Duras, at whose delightful hotel I used to see him, in 1818 and 1819. See Vol. I. pp. 137, etc., and 254, 255. He is much altered since that time. The wrinkles are sunk deep into his face, and his features are grown very hard; but he has the same striking and somewhat theatrical air he always had, and which is quite well expressed in the common engraved portraits. He talked of Mad. de Duras with feeling, or the affectation of it, and of the days of Louis XVIII. with a little bitterness, and very dogmatically, not concealing the onion that if hi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
yet once more, for there is a greater chance that I shall be in Europe three times now, than there was originally that I should come once. So, I still say au revoir. Yours faithfully and affectionately, G. Ticknor Reaching London on the 22d of May, Mr. Ticknor was again plunged, for two weeks, into the excitements of the season. On the day after his arrival he received and paid some visits, and thus describes Lord Brougham:— He has gained a good deal of flesh since I knew him in 1818-19, and is even improved in that particular since I saw him at York three years ago. But in other respects I do not think he is changed for the better. He showed a very disagreeable disposition when he spoke of Jeffrey and Empson . . . . . It was really ungentlemanlike and coarse to speak as he did, of two persons who were formerly his associates, and are still, in all respects of general intercourse, his equals. What struck me most, however, was his marvellous memory. He remembered where
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
never saw so much of it before, or was so much with the people that carry it on. Certainly I never watched it so carefully, or knew so much about it, as I do now. In 1837 the amusements of the Carnival were prohibited from fear of cholera. In 1818 they were free from the noisy and boisterous manners of foreigners, and Mr. Ticknor remarked on the difference, saying that then, instead of the present indiscriminate pelting with cruel plaster confetti, nothing but bouquets and bonbons were throeady among the things of the past. Its last relics lie buried with Madame de Circourt and Madame de Rauzan. What I saw of it was in 1817, in the salon of the dying Madame de Stael, in that of Madame de Chateaubriand and Madame Constant; then, in 1818 and 1819, in the more brilliant salons of the Duchesse de Duras and the Duchesse de Broglie, and of the Comatesse de Ste. Aulaire, not forgetting the Saturday evenings at the palace, where the Duchesse de Duras received, with inimitable graciousne
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
ng creature, and if I were to fail to love her, I should be very ungrateful. A good many people come to see me, and I of course return their calls, but I have not time to tell you of them, still less to repeat, as I intended to do when I began this volume,. some of their good things . . . . July 10.—I am invited thrice to breakfast this morning, and although I am sorry to miss Dean Trench, and should have liked the company at Senior's, including Lesseps,—whose father I knew at Lisbon in 1818,—yet I rather think I am in luck in being first engaged to Lord Stanhope . . . . . The breakfast was first-rate in all points, company and talk. Lady Evelyn Stanhope was the first person I saw,—young, pretty, unmarried. . . . . The next was Tocqueville; . . . . then came the Lyells, Lord Aberdeen, and Lord Caernarvon, a young nobleman of great fortune and promise, who, a few years ago, carried off the first honors at Oxford. All talked French . . . . . This gave Tocqueville, of course, the
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
e months last year in the United States. I assure you he saw things with an eye both very acute and very vigilant. . . . . July 26.—I took Senior in my little brougham, and drove to Richmond to make two or three visits. First we went to the Marquis of Lansdowne's, who, I am sorry to notice, grows feeble fast, though he preserves his good spirits, and has the same gentle courtesy he always had . . . . The Flahaults were there, and seemed to take pleasure in remembering our acquaintance in 1818-19, at Edinburgh . . . . The charming, unworldly Lady Shelburne, who seems more agreeable than ever, is, you know, their daughter. . . . . I found her too, and her father and mother, at Lord John Russell's, where I was invited to an afternoon dejeuner, and where I met a good deal of distingue company; Lord Monteagle, et que sais-je? Lord John has a beautiful place in Richmond Park, which the Queen has given him for his life, and where he seems to live very happily with his children. He showe
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
We are all well, and send kindest regards. . . . . Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March 26, 1860. I have been invited by the Historical Society of New York, with Everett and one or two more hereabouts, to listen in their Music Hall to a discourse which Bryant, the poet, will deliver on Washington Irving's birthday, April 3, in honor of his genius and virtues. As I really loved and admired him very much,—having lived a good deal with him in London in 1818-19, just before the Sketch Book came out, when he was in straitened circumstances and little known, —I mean to go. I will not disguise from you, however, that Mrs. Ticknor and Anna, without whom, and their influence, I should not move, want a spree, and that Everett has entered into a bond to do all the talking. In this way I count upon a good time. . . . . I had a letter yesterday from Lord Carlisle. He seems to think that busy times are on them in Europe, and rejoices—as we do here --t<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Appendix C: (search)
Appendix C: Literary honors. 1816.Mineralogical Society of Jena. 1818.Royal Academy of History, Madrid. 1821.American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston. 1821.American Academy of Languages and Belles-Lettres, Boston. 1825.Columbian Institute, Washington, D. C. 1828.American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia 1832.Royal Patriotic Society, Havana. 1833.Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. 1845.American Ethnological Society, New York. 1850.Doctor of Laws, Harvard College, Massachusetts. 1850.Doctor of Laws, Brown University, Rhode Island. 1850.Society of Antiquaries, of London. 1850.Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore. 1857.Institute of Science, Letters, and Arts, of Lombardy. 1858.Doctor of Laws, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire. 1858.Historical Society of Tennessee, Nashville. 1864.Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 1866.Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Philadelphia. 1866.Doctor Literarum Humaniorum, Regents of the University o
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