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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 248 248 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 44 44 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 26 26 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 21 21 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 20 20 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for 1819 AD or search for 1819 AD in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
e, three days. To-morrow he is to have an operation performed, and when he is sufficiently recovered will go to the South of France. It is a great pain to see him so different from what he was when I knew him at Milan in 1817, and at Paris in 1818-19. The Austrian government seems to have succeeded. It has crushed him, broken his spirit, broken his heart; and his nature was so noble and lofty that it seems as if tyranny were encouraged and strengthened, by his present condition, to proceed ase of one of the Tales of Fashionable Life, by Miss Edgeworth, which is founded on incidents of Madame de Pastoret's experience. M. de Pastoret received the title of Marquis from Louis XVIII. She is, of course, much altered since I knew her in 1818-19; but she is well, and able to devote herself, as she always has done, to works of most faithful and wise charity. Her fortune, and that of her family, is large; but being Carlists, and sincerely and conscientiously so, they gave up offices in 1830
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
ere a sort of hospice, where he supports twelve poor men and twelve poor women, in extreme old age; not, indeed, out of his own means, but by an annual contribution which he levies every year, far and wide, even in the palace of the abominated Louis Philippe. He received me kindly in his study, which did not seem very comfortable, but which contained a superb copy of a Holy Family, by Mignard, given to him by the late Duchess de Duras, at whose delightful hotel I used to see him, in 1818 and 1819. See Vol. I. pp. 137, etc., and 254, 255. He is much altered since that time. The wrinkles are sunk deep into his face, and his features are grown very hard; but he has the same striking and somewhat theatrical air he always had, and which is quite well expressed in the common engraved portraits. He talked of Mad. de Duras with feeling, or the affectation of it, and of the days of Louis XVIII. with a little bitterness, and very dogmatically, not concealing the onion that if his judgmen
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
e had to give me were not very curious. March 24.—I had a long visit this morning from Hallam, whom I never saw before, because he was not in London, either in 1819 or 1835, when I was here. It gratified me very much. He is such a man as I should have desired to find him; a little sensitive and nervous, perhaps, but dignifieertainly he was very agreeable. The superciliousness he showed when he was in America, and the quiet coldness I used to witness in him sometimes in Edinburgh, in 1819, were not at all perceptible to-day. He was very lively, and yet showed more sense than wit. We talked a good deal about the late atrocious duel of Cilley at Wash. . . . . Her health has long been bad, and she showed to-day but slight traces of the round, happy, and most beautiful creature I knew, just sixteen years old, in 1819, at Southey's. But she was very lady-like and gentle in her manner, and showed occasionally bright flashes of spirit and fancy. She is very pleasing, too, and I d
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
. . . But there was not much else [except some pictures] to recall the cottage which I visited in 1819 so happily, and, indeed, it was not without a good deal of difficulty that I found the room in whurnfully calls poor 39, the very house in which I had passed so many pleasant hours with Scott in 1819. . . . . I was received up stairs in Mrs. Scott's drawing-rooms, fitted up for a bachelor and man 1471, which was sold, in 1812, at the Roxburgh auction, for £ 2,260, and which was sold again in 1819, at the sale of the Duke of Marlborough's—Marquis of Blandford's White Knight's—library, for £ 91and thus describes Lord Brougham:— He has gained a good deal of flesh since I knew him in 1818-19, and is even improved in that particular since I saw him at York three years ago. But in other resat struck me most, however, was his marvellous memory. He remembered where I lodged in London in 1819, on what occasions he came to see me, and some circumstances about my attendance on the committe
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
tness of the loss,—for he was certainly the most important man in the Administration after Webster left it,—filled our city with sorrow and consternation, shocking all so much the more, for the jubilant excitement of the days immediately preceding it. To me the personal loss is very great. He was a man of genius, full of refinement and poetry, and one of the best scholars in the country; but, more than all this, he was of a most warm and affectionate spirit. I had known him familiarly from 1819, when we studied together in Edinburgh. When we passed that winter in Dresden, in 1835-36, of which you know so well, he, being then our minister at Brussels, came to us and spent a week with us; and every year but one, since we came home, he has made a pilgrimage to the North, to see us. But the two last years he came to us in our retreat on the sea-shore, and made it brilliant to us by his wit and dear by his affections; and now, when the President should have left Boston, he intended to h
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
tion of his History of Spanish Literature, Mr. Ticknor did not take up any new or absorbing occupation, but, at the end of a little more than two years, he was asked—unexpectedly to him—to take part in a work which connected itself with plans and desires that had long been among his favorite speculations, and he soon became profoundly interested, and zealously active in promoting the organization of the Boston Public Library. In the early period of his life, when he returned from Europe in 1819, after enjoying great advantages from the public libraries of the large cities and universities which he visited, the idea of a grand, free library, to supply similar resources in this country, was talked of by him with a few of his friends, and was for a time uppermost in his thoughts. Some movement was made to increase the Library of Harvard College, and that of the Athenaeum, in which he co-operated; but the improvements then gained seemed to satisfy the immediate wants of the community,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
to me . . . . On looking over your letter to see if there is anything to answer, I notice with pleasure what you say of Humboldt. He is, indeed, a man worth knowing, and even more so now, than he was when I was first acquainted with him in 1817-19. His kindliness increases with his years. Every day of the fortnight I was in Berlin he did something for me, and every day I either saw him or had a note from him. The minuteness of his care would have been remarkable in a young man. One day, whg the things of the past. Its last relics lie buried with Madame de Circourt and Madame de Rauzan. What I saw of it was in 1817, in the salon of the dying Madame de Stael, in that of Madame de Chateaubriand and Madame Constant; then, in 1818 and 1819, in the more brilliant salons of the Duchesse de Duras and the Duchesse de Broglie, and of the Comatesse de Ste. Aulaire, not forgetting the Saturday evenings at the palace, where the Duchesse de Duras received, with inimitable graciousness and di
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
nths last year in the United States. I assure you he saw things with an eye both very acute and very vigilant. . . . . July 26.—I took Senior in my little brougham, and drove to Richmond to make two or three visits. First we went to the Marquis of Lansdowne's, who, I am sorry to notice, grows feeble fast, though he preserves his good spirits, and has the same gentle courtesy he always had . . . . The Flahaults were there, and seemed to take pleasure in remembering our acquaintance in 1818-19, at Edinburgh . . . . The charming, unworldly Lady Shelburne, who seems more agreeable than ever, is, you know, their daughter. . . . . I found her too, and her father and mother, at Lord John Russell's, where I was invited to an afternoon dejeuner, and where I met a good deal of distingue company; Lord Monteagle, et que sais-je? Lord John has a beautiful place in Richmond Park, which the Queen has given him for his life, and where he seems to live very happily with his children. He showed me
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
e are all well, and send kindest regards. . . . . Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March 26, 1860. I have been invited by the Historical Society of New York, with Everett and one or two more hereabouts, to listen in their Music Hall to a discourse which Bryant, the poet, will deliver on Washington Irving's birthday, April 3, in honor of his genius and virtues. As I really loved and admired him very much,—having lived a good deal with him in London in 1818-19, just before the Sketch Book came out, when he was in straitened circumstances and little known, —I mean to go. I will not disguise from you, however, that Mrs. Ticknor and Anna, without whom, and their influence, I should not move, want a spree, and that Everett has entered into a bond to do all the talking. In this way I count upon a good time. . . . . I had a letter yesterday from Lord Carlisle. He seems to think that busy times are on them in Europe, and rejoices—as we do here --that <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
hat I hold to be precious. Your notice of the death of a sister, who had been your companion from childhood, and whose empty seat by your hearth makes you feel very desolate, touches me nearly. I am old,—almost seventythree,—and the few friends of my youth and riper years, that have remained to me until now, are constantly dropping away. One has fallen this week. Another will go soon. And the rest must follow before long, whether it pleases God that I should precede them or not. In 1819 I spent two or three days with the Duke of Bedford at Woburn Abbey. See Vol. I. p. 268. There was a brilliant party there, just at the end of the shooting-season,—the old Lord Spencer, Frere, the Jerseys, etc. One forenoon I remember that, with your brother, and a clergyman whose name I have forgotten, I walked a good deal about the grounds and park. Lord John was at home, and my recollections of him—with whom I have kept up some intercourse from time to time ever since—and of your br
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