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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 248 248 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 44 44 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 26 26 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 21 21 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 20 20 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 13 13 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 22, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1819 AD or search for 1819 AD in all documents.

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ances to spread and heighten the delu Nothing could illustrate more fully the madness, which is now waning so fast, than the facility with which they have been able, hitherto, to impose it on the public credulity. We presume that no one who knows anything of the American character, or has read the history of the American people, can honestly believe the latter to be either cowards or mercenaries. With the sad exception of a portion of the population of New England, in the struggle from 1819, there is no record of their having ever shrunk from any of the duties or sacrifices imposed on them by patriotism in time of war. On the contrary, they have been so ready, always to answer to the call of country, that they have more than once mistaken for it the false appeals of demagoguism and passion. They have always been so willing, and often so anxious to fight, that European diplomacy has long characterized them, proverbially, as disturbers of the peace of nations. It was this hasty