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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for December 3rd, 1822 AD or search for December 3rd, 1822 AD in all documents.

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le of Cold Harbor, where it had joined the Army of the Potomac. He resigned from the volunteer service in 1865, and from the regular army in 1867, with the brevet of major-general. He became president of the International Telegraph Company, and was president of the board of Police commissioners in New York City, 1877. After that, he practised civil engineering. He died in Philadelphia, February 28, 1903. Brigadier-General Charles Adams Heckman was born in Easton, Pennsylvania, December 3, 1822. He served in the Mexican War, and went to the Civil War as lieutenant-colonel of the Ninth New Jersey Infantry. He became a colonel and had a brigade in the Department of North Carolina, where, after being made brigadier-general of volunteers, he had a division in the Eighteenth Army Corps. Later, he had charge of the District of Beaufort and the defenses of New Berne and at Newport News. On May 16, 1864, at the head of a brigade he was captured at Drewry's Bluff. He had temporary