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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 226 226 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 28 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 23 23 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1823 AD or search for 1823 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 2: Parentage and Family.—the father. (search)
y to increase his professional income, so as to educate his children, then five in number. His condition of health, as he stated at the time, advised a less sedentary occupation than he had been following. To Josiah Quincy, whom he called his master, he wrote an apologetic note, stating his proposed change of life. William Minot, and other members of the bar who knew his worth, volunteered to be his sureties. The revenues of his office proved to be less than a thousand dollars a year. In 1823, he declined the office of City Marshal, tendered him by Mr. Quincy, then Mayor. In 1825, his affairs took a favorable turn. On Sept. 6, by appointment of Governor Levi Lincoln, he became sheriff of Suffolk County; succeeding Joseph Hall, who had been appointed Judge of Probate. This office he continued to hold till April 11, 1839, thirteen days before his death. His first commission was during pleasure. Under a later statute, which fixed a term of five years for the office, he was rea
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
enteen days since I left New York for Havre in the ship Albany, Captain Johnston. Described in a letter of Sumner to Judge Story, Dec. 25, as a man of science and veracity. My passage had been taken, and my bill on the Rothschilds in Paris obtained, on the 7th December. On that day dined with a pleasant party at Mrs. Ledyard's, Mrs. Susan Ledyard, 53 Crosby Street; a friend of Judge Story, and the daughter of Brockholst Livingston, a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1806-23. She died March 7, 1864; surviving her husband, Benjamin Ledyard, more than half a century.— the last dinner of my native land. Left early, called on one or two friends, and spent the residue of the hours before retiring—running far into the watches of the night—in writing letters; saying some parting words to the friends whom I value. And a sad time it was, full of anxious thoughts and doubts, with mingled gleams of glorious anticipations. I thought much of the position which I abandoned <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
n with the Jewish government. Constant Prevost also used notes for his lecture. Saint-Hilaire did not appear to have any. Unlike the professors at the École de Droit, those of the Sorbonne whom I have seen had no dress or badge, except a piece of red ribbon in one of the upper button-holes on the left lapel of their coats. At the École de Droit to-day I heard Delzers Joseph Francois Casimir Delzers, 1787-; a writer upon criminal law and criminal and civil procedure, and a professor from 1823 to 1857. on Procedure Civile. He was a man with hard features, of about fifty-five years of age, and with the black gown, red scarf, and red cap which I had before observed as the garb of Rossi. His manner was very plain and deliberate. He read an article in the code, having the book before him, and then proceeded in a plain way to expound it. In the course of an hour he expounded about a page of the code, relating to the formalities of recording the judgment. I was happy to find that I co
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
t like him. He has made some rulings on points of order this winter in the Chamber, which would have properly proceeded from the Czar of Russia or the Sultan of Turkey; but parliamentary proceedings are not understood at all in France. I shall fatigue you with law and politics, but out of the fulness of the mind the pen moves. . . . As ever affectionately yours, C. S. Journal. April 10. To-day was presented by Colonel White Joseph M. White, delegate to Congress from Florida from 1823 to 1837. He died at St. Louis in 1839. to Madame Murat, Caroline Bonaparte, Napoleon's youngest sister, was born at Ajaccio, March 26, 1782. As the wife of Murat, whom she married in 1800, she became Queen of Naples in 1808. After his execution, in 1815, she assumed the title of Countess of Lipona. She lived at Trieste many years, and died in Florence, May 18, 1839. In 1838, the French Assembly granted her a pension. Her son, Napoleon Achille, died in Florida in 1847. the sister of N
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ard Vaughan, 1775-1849; Fellow of All Souls' College, Oxford; Secretary of Legation in Spain in 1810; Minister Plenipotentiary to Spain, 1815-16; to Switzerland in 1823; and to the United States, 1825-35 (with an absence, 1831-33). His friendly relations at Washington with Judge Story brought the latter into a correspondence with , 1766-1851. He was chosen to Parliament in 1796; was in the foreign service at Denmark; Lord of the Treasury in Ireland; Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1812 to 1823; and then raised to the peerage as Baron Bexley. He was distinguished for his capacity in financial administration. He promoted religious and charitable enterprih way he should instruct the jury. His wife is Lady St. John, Louisa, daughter of Sir Charles William Boughton Rouse, and widow of Lord St John, was married in 1823 to Sergeant Vaughan, and died in 1840. the origin of whose title I do not remember, though I think he explained it to me. She is of the family of Sir Theodosius Bo