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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 256 256 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 48 48 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 30 30 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 20 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 11 11 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15.. You can also browse the collection for 1825 AD or search for 1825 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

one. And a thrush sings far away, To the sun, and the nesting wife, And the sweet, wild note from the glad bird's throat Tells my joy in the day—and life. In 1825, through the suggestion of the Rev. Andrew Bigelow, a social library was formed in Medford, promotive of good morals, and to aid in the diffusion of valuable inforrse Francis. Her first novel, Hobomok, published in 1824, when she was only twenty-three years of age, was a great success, and was soon followed by the Rebels in 1825. She edited a periodical for children called Juvenile Miscellany, afterwards published as Flowers for Children. The Frugal Housewife; Evenings in New England, 18 Medford in 1794. She went abroad, met many famous people, and achieved an international reputation for her poetry—Judith, Esther, and Other Poems, 1820; Zophiel, 1825; and an Ode to the Departed. Robert Southey was said to have given her the name Maria del Occidente, which she used as a nom de plume. She wrote a novel in 1843 c
mile above Malden Bridge. In very high tides it is covered with water, same as the surrounding marshes; it contains about 14 acres. It was bought of the Town of Charlestown about 1787 by Saml Swan Jr. then of Charlestown; he had the grass and sedge cut and taken to Medford in a scow, every year for many years after he lived in Medford. He then some years sold the grass to a man in Reading, for $30 a year—and sometimes for half the grass delivered to him in Medford. After his death in 1825 the island was owned by his son Dr. Swan of Medford, who sold the crop of grass for $15 to $20 per year. In 184—he sold the island to Atwood & Brothers of Boston, for planting Oysters on the Flats. Soon after this the Flats on the East side were claimed by a person in Malden as being formerly part of the mainland of Malden, and a suit was brought, but it was shown in Court by Dr. Swan to have been an Island on the first settlement of the Country and the suit wholly failed. Now that fift
Looking Backwards. MY father, Solomon Manning, was born in Chelmsford, Mass., in 1799. His mother was Lucy Andrews of Carlisle. Father was in the employ of Mr. Dudley Hall of Medford from 1820 to 1825. Mr. Hall owned a large amount of land extending north into what is now known as the Fells. Considerable domestic stock was kept, and butter and cheese were made on the farm. The stock barns were north of the Hall homestead on the hill. To get to them there were fifty stone steps up the steep ascent just back of the house. The granite steps were taken from Tyngsboro, coming by boats on the Middlesex Canal. Farming was done with oxen. Mr. Hall also had a distillery where Medford rum was made. Molasses was brought from the wharves in Boston to Medford by ox teams and boats called Gundelows. My father did the teaming, and has told me he had many times arrived in Boston, five miles away, with a load of rum by sunrise when the thermometer was below zero. There was no com