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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 212 212 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 40 40 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 31 31 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 21 21 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 13 13 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 12 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22.. You can also browse the collection for 1827 AD or search for 1827 AD in all documents.

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a city, as it shows no ward divisions. Various maps prepared by the city engineers, showing the water and sewer systems, have been included in the printed city reports. The latest we notice is that of Engineer Charnock, January I, 1916. This shows the ward and precinct lines, and such streets in Maiden, Somerville and Arlington as cross or are near boundaries. Judge Wait alluded to twenty-two plans of various localities in Medford that were recorded in Middlesex (South) Registry between 1827 and 1855. One of these (August, 1850) in Plan Book 5, p. 8, he styles very interesting. It is called Land of Brooks, at West Medford. See Register, Vol. I, p. 126.. It shows the entire tract between High street, the B. & L. R. R. and the river, with the Middlesex canal and its lock, aqueduct and tavern. Practically the same layout is shown on the Walling map of 1855, but without the names of streets, though the names of Gorham and Lake parks are given. This plan was made in the last da
soon became obsolete, it was well the project was abandoned and the lower lake did not become a floating junk-yard. Another project that failed was, in 1876, the Mystic Valley railroad that began to fill an embankment requiring a bridge across the old course of the Aberjona at the upper end of the lake. This, the upper reach of the Mystic (and sometimes called Symmes' river) had been crossed by the long wooden aqueduct of the canal in 1802, replaced by the substantial stone structure of 1827, removed in 1865, as was also the Symmes dam and waterpower the same year. If we trace the stream farther up we go beyond old Medford bounds and out of Upper Medford, as it used to be called. We will find that our neighboring town of Winchester has improved its flow through her territory, making it permanently ornamental, adding much to its attractiveness. And now we come back to our caption query, Why Mystic? and answer, Mystic it is not, except by common usage. Missi-tuk, the India
ll railroad embankment, built in 1834, across the marshland of Charlestown (now Somerville) on the right, looking down stream. The lines of the river bank are here much changed, but the stone arch remains, embedded in the newer one of concrete, built in 1906. The upper right-hand view is Canal bridge, over which Boston avenue was built in 1873. There were four spans, in all one hundred and thirty-four feet, the length of the first canal aqueduct, which was here built in 1802. Renewed in 1827, on the old abutments and on three new granite piers, it remained disused from 1852 to 1873, gradually becoming a picturesque ruin, until utilized as here seen. The name was given it by the city government, at the request of the Historical Society, in 1903. The iron cover in the foreground is of the Metropolitan sewer siphon, and the daisies were in full bloom when the photographer looked up stream here. The earliest portion of the parkway to be built in Medford was from High street alon
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22., A Medford garden and the gardener's notes. (search)
Burridge was the gardener, in the employ of the Bigelow family many years. The writer has at hand two note-books measuring three and three-quarters inches by six and one-quarter inches, with limp covers of marbled paper, one marked Garden Book, 1827, kept by this old-time gardener. With these in lieu of Open Sesame, the gate will swing back and give the readers of the Register a glimpse of this old garden, let them see the fruits that were grown, the crops harvested. These books were neatlyThe blossoming of the quinces was regularly noted each year without fail. The vegetables from his garden supplied Mr. Bigelow's table; his house was called the seat of hospitality, and he himself was termed a hospitable neighbor. January th 18 1827 at 7 o'clock A. M. Glass was doun six degrees below zero. Next morning the same March 26 Saw the first swallow March 27 Apricot & peach in blossom April 11 Wall trees in full Blossom April 12 planted the first Corn & potatoes & Summ