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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 228 228 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 40 40 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 32 32 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 29 29 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 24 24 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 18 18 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 18 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 17 17 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 14 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct.. You can also browse the collection for 1828 AD or search for 1828 AD in all documents.

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of the work. The precinct and town records have, of course, been much relied upon, and information from them, as well as from gravestones, is given, as far as practicable, in the phraseology originally used. The church records have been found invaluable. Rev. Mr. Cooke, first minister of the Precinct (1739-1783), was an admirable recorder, whose specialty was the church records, and the Precinct births, baptisms, marriages and deaths. The records by Rev. Dr. Fiske cover forty years (1788-1828). Care has been taken to make proper reference in the text to two valuable recent publications—those of Rev. Dr. Paige and Thomas B. Wyman—from which important facts have been derived. Reference is also made to these works when further information on the subject may there be obtained. The author is greatly indebted to John B. Russell, Esq., a native of the town, now of New Jersey, for many important and interesting statements and reminiscences. He is also under obligations to Mr. B. D. Lo
pastoral labors among us. West Cambridge, May 14, 1828. 1828, May 26. Mr. Miles Gardner chosen Deacon. After the dea and John Adams, chosen 1792; Ephraim Cutter, chosen before 1828; Miles Gardner, chosen 1828. To his time, also, three Cove1828. To his time, also, three Covenants had been in use by the Church: (1) The Covenant used by Mr. Cooke, the first minister, and his successor Dr. Fiske; (2 Whittemore, 1827, 1836; James Perry, 1827: Kimball Farmer, 1828; Thomas Thorp, 1828; Isaac Shattuck, 1828; Isaac Locke, 1821828; Isaac Shattuck, 1828; Isaac Locke, 1828-1830, 1832; William Locke, 2d, 1829, 1841; William Cotting, 1829-1831; Samuel Butterfield, 1829, 1831; Abner Peirce, 1830,1828; Isaac Locke, 1828-1830, 1832; William Locke, 2d, 1829, 1841; William Cotting, 1829-1831; Samuel Butterfield, 1829, 1831; Abner Peirce, 1830, 1838; John Fowle, 1830, 1832, 1833; Abel Locke, 1831, 1833, 1837; James Brown, 1831; Joshua Avery, 1832; Jesse Bucknam, 1831828-1830, 1832; William Locke, 2d, 1829, 1841; William Cotting, 1829-1831; Samuel Butterfield, 1829, 1831; Abner Peirce, 1830, 1838; John Fowle, 1830, 1832, 1833; Abel Locke, 1831, 1833, 1837; James Brown, 1831; Joshua Avery, 1832; Jesse Bucknam, 1833, 1834-1838; William Hill, 2d, 1833, 1851, Jr. 1852; Elijah Cutter, 1834; Seth Frost, 1834: Philip Whittemore, 1834, 1835; bers of the Friendship Engine, their poll tax from the year 1828. 1841 The Parish Hall is used for town meetings at th
1820-22, 1838. Miles Gardner, 1823-25, 1827, 1828. Jonathan Frost, 2d, 1826-28 (excused 1828)28 (excused 1828). John Perry, 1826-31. Walter Russell, 1826. Ephraim Tufts, 1828 (excused). Amos Hill, 11828). John Perry, 1826-31. Walter Russell, 1826. Ephraim Tufts, 1828 (excused). Amos Hill, 1828 (excused). George Stearns, 1828-34. Reuben Johnson, 1829-34. Kimball Farmer, 1832-34. 1828 (excused). Amos Hill, 1828 (excused). George Stearns, 1828-34. Reuben Johnson, 1829-34. Kimball Farmer, 1832-34. David Dodge, 1835-41. Benjamin Hill, 1835-37. Mansur W. Marsh, 1839-41, 1843. Charles Muzze1828 (excused). George Stearns, 1828-34. Reuben Johnson, 1829-34. Kimball Farmer, 1832-34. David Dodge, 1835-41. Benjamin Hill, 1835-37. Mansur W. Marsh, 1839-41, 1843. Charles Muzzey, 1839-41. Daniel Cady, 1843. Abbot Allen, 1844. Thomas P. Peirce, 1844, 1845, 1848. Sila1828-34. Reuben Johnson, 1829-34. Kimball Farmer, 1832-34. David Dodge, 1835-41. Benjamin Hill, 1835-37. Mansur W. Marsh, 1839-41, 1843. Charles Muzzey, 1839-41. Daniel Cady, 1843. Abbot Allen, 1844. Thomas P. Peirce, 1844, 1845, 1848. Silas Frost, 1844, 1845. William Dickson, 1845, 1846, 1850-60 (resigned). Isaiah Jenkins, 1846. , 1831 (resigned). Gershom Whittemore, 1827, 1828. Isaac Hill, 1829 (resigned). Col. Thomasussell, 1827, 1831, 1837. James Russell, Esq., 1828, 1829, 1882, 1839-41. Charles Wellington, 181828. Jonathan M. Dexter, 1828, 1829, 1835-1837. Rev. Ebenezer Nelson, 1829, 1830, 1832, 1833—than1828, 1829, 1835-1837. Rev. Ebenezer Nelson, 1829, 1830, 1832, 1833—thanks of the town extended for his faithful services as one of the school committee, in 1834. Rev. F[1 more...]<
hool was organized Oct. 21, 1828. A new and more commodious church edifice was dedicated March 31, 1853. The house is of the Gothic style of architecture, and was erected at the cost of $15,000, including an organ and other appurtenances. It was subjected to extensive repairs about 1871, at an expense of over $11,000. The ministers of the Society have been:—Thomas Green, 1783-93; position of minister vacant, 1794-1818; Benjamin C. Grafton, 1818-23; John Ormsby, 1824-27; Ebenezer Nelson, 1828-34; Appleton Morse and Charles Miller, 1834-38; So given in the Arlington Baptist Church Book, but not recognized as such in the Massachusetts Registers of the time. Timothy C. Tingley, 1838-45; George J. Carleton, 1845-51; Joseph Banvard, 1851-53; Samuel B. Swaim, 1854-62; John Duncan, 1863-64; Amos Harris, 1865-75; Charles H. Spaulding, 1876-79. Universalist Society.—A Society of this denomination appears to have existed in the town as early as 1832, but without a regular established
life in Lawrence and in Lowell, though he carried on the business of a block printer at Taunton, Arlington and Burlington. He joined the Odd Fellows at Taunton in 1828, being the oldest Odd Fellow perhaps in the state. At his decease he was a member of Merrimack Lodge, Lowell. He was also a member of the Grand Lodge and was at ivered at Worcester, in or about 1826. (5) A Sermon delivered at Lunenburg, Dec. 2, 1827, by David Damon, at the close of his ministry in that town. Lancaster, 1828. Pp. 22. (6) Address delivered at Amesbury, Aug. 2, 1829, previous to the organization of the Salisbury and Amesbury Society for Promoting Temperance. By Davide American Patriot, changed its name to the New Hampshire Patriot, and made it the organ of the Republican party; for twenty years it had an immense influence. In 1828 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the U. S. Senate; in 1829 he was Second Comptroller of the Treasury; U. S. Senator, 1830-36; Governor of New Hampshire, 1836-3