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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 56 56 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 56 56 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 34 34 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 30 30 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 30 30 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 24 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1830 AD or search for 1830 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 222 results in 192 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, Benjamin Vaughan, 1830-1890 (search)
Abbott, Benjamin Vaughan, 1830-1890 Legal writer; born in Boston, Mass., June 4, 1830. He was graduated at the New York University in 1850; was admitted to the bar two years afterwards; and, after engaging in general practice with his brother Austin for several years, applied himself to a compilation of works on legal subjects. Alone, or in conjunction with his brother, he compiled nearly 100 volumes of digests, reports, legal treatises, and other allied works, including Dictionary of terms in American and English Jurisprudence, National digest, and a revison of the United States statutes. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 17, 1890.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbott, John Stevens Cabot, 1805-1877 (search)
Abbott, John Stevens Cabot, 1805-1877 Historian; born in Brunswick, Me., Sept. 18, 1805; brother of Jacob; was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1825, and at Andover Seminary; was ordained as a Congregational minister in 1830. and held several pastorates in Massachusetts till 1844, after which he applied himself wholly to literature. Among his notable works are The French Revolution of 1789; The history of Napoleon Bonaparte; Napoleon at St. Helena; The history of Napoleon III.; The history of the Civil War in America; A romance of Spanish history: and The history of Frederick II., called Frederick the Great. He died in Fair Haven, Conn., June 17. 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolitionists. (search)
issatisfied with Sherbrook Island, and on Dec. 15, 1821, a permanent location was purchased at Cape Mesurado. In 1847. the colony declared itself an independent republic under the name of Liberia (q. v.), its capital being Monrovia. It was in 1830 that the abolitionist movement proper began. In 1829-30, William Lloyd Garrison engaged with Benjamin Lundy in publishing The genius of universal emancipation, in Baltimore. Garrison's first efforts were directed against the Colonization Society30, William Lloyd Garrison engaged with Benjamin Lundy in publishing The genius of universal emancipation, in Baltimore. Garrison's first efforts were directed against the Colonization Society and gradual abolition. He insisted on the use of every means at all times towards abolition without regard to the wishes of slave-owners. The effects were almost immediately apparent. Abolition, with its new elements of effort and intention, was no longer a doctrine to be quietly and benignantly discussed by slave-owners. On Jan. 1, 1831, Garrison began publishing The liberator, in Boston; the New England Anti-Slavery Society was formed Jan. 1, 1832; in 1833 Garrison visited England, and se
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agnew, Cornelius Rea, 1830-1888 (search)
Agnew, Cornelius Rea, 1830-1888 Physician and surgeon; born in New York City, Aug. 8, 1830; was graduated at Columbia College in 1849, and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1852, subsequently continuing his studies in Europe. He became surgeon-general of the State of New York in 1858, and at the beginning of the Civil War was appointed medical director of the New York State Volunteer Hospital. During the war he was also one of the most influential members of the United States Sanitary commission (q. v.). After the war he gave much attention to opthalmology, founded the Brooklyn Eye and Ear Hospital, and became Clinical Professor of the Diseases of the Eye and Ear in the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Agnew was actively identified with the educational institutions of New York City, and was one of the founders of the Columbia College School of Mines. He died in New York, April 8, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
Algiers, One of the former Barbary States on the northern coast of Africa, stretching west from Egypt to the Atlantic Ocean; bombarded and captured by the French in 1830, and held under French military control till 1871, when a French civil administration was established. All of Algeria is now considered a part of France rather than a colony. The city of Algiers, under French domination, is the capital of the department and colony, is well equipped with educational institutions, and has become as orderly as any place in France. The population in 1891 was 82.585. The Barbary States derived their name from the Berbers, the ancient inhabitants. From their ports, especially from Algiers, went out piratical vessels to depredate upon the commerce of other peoples. So early as 1785 two American vessels had been captured by these corsairs, and their crews (twenty-one persons) had been held in slavery for ransom. The Dey, or ruler, of Algiers demanded $60,000 for their redemption.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 (search)
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 Twenty-first President of the United States, from Sept. 19, 1881, to March 4, 1885; Republican; born in Fairfield, Vt., Oct. 5, 1830; was graduated at Union College in 1848; studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1854; and became a successful practitioner. He gained much celebrity in a suit which involved the freedom of some slaves, known as the Lemmon case. He procured the admission of colored persons to the street-cars of New York City by gaining a suit against a railway company in 1856. Mr. Arthur did efficient service during the Civil War as quartermaster-general of the State of New York. In 1872 he was appointed collector of the port of New York, and was removed in 1878. In 1880, he was elected Vice-President, and on the death of President Garfield, Sept, 19, 1881, he became President. He died in New York City, Nov. 18, 1886. Veto of Chinese immigration bill. On April 4, 1882, President Arthur sent the following veto message to the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bank of the United States. (search)
ion by the great bank, but many, after a struggle more or less prolonged, closed their doors. Of the 246 State banks, with an aggregate capital of about $90,000,000 in 1816, a very large number were compelled to go into liquidation. From 1811 to 1830 165 banks, with a capital of $30.000,000, closed their business, and the loss of the government and of individuals by these banks was estimated at $5,000,000, or one-sixth of their capital. The second United States Bank went into operation in Philed in the fulfilment of the promises of its creation — namely, to establish a uniform and sound currency for the whole nation; and, also, that such an institution was not authorized by the national Constitution. Again, in his annual messages in 1830 and 1831, he attacked the bank, and renewed his objections. At the close of 1831 the proper officers of the bank petitioned, for the first time, for the renewal of its charter. The petition was presented in the Senate Jan. 9, 1832, and on March
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
g them a discharge, and left them to the tender mercies of their creditors. It was followed by a number of similar laws. enlarging its scope and changing its procedure. 2. The statute of 1706, in the fifth year of Queen Anne, marks the next great step in advance. Debt was no longer treated as a crime, and provision was for the first time made for a discharge. 3. The statute of 1825, in the reign of George IV., for the first time recognized voluntary bankruptcies. 4. The statute of 1830 abolished commissioners in bankruptcy, put the administration of estates into the hands of the court, and created the official assignee or receiver. 5. The statute of 1861 made it possible for the non-trader, who had been protected by the insolvent debtor acts for about fifty years, to take advantage of or to be proceeded against under the general bankruptcy laws. 6. The statute of 1869 introduced in England the now well-understood principle of fraudulent preferences; but, the law being
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baraga, Frederick, 1797-1868 (search)
Baraga, Frederick, 1797-1868 Clergyman; born in Carniola, Austria, June 29, 1797; in 1830 determined to devote his life to the conversion of Indians in the United States; settled among the Ottawas in Michigan. In 1856 he was appointed Bishop of Marquette. In addition to translating prayer-books, hymn-books, catechisms, etc., into the Indian language, he wrote in German the History, character, manners, and customs of the North American Indians. He died in Marquette, Mich., Jan. 19, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, Henry, 1811- (search)
Barnard, Henry, 1811- Educator; born in Hartford, Conn., Jan. 24, 1811; was graduated at Yale College in 1830; admitted to the bar in 1835, and elected to a seat in the State legislature in 1837. He was twice re-elected. In that body he effected a reorganization of the Connecticut State school system, and was for four years secretary of the board of school commissioners, during which he wrote a number of able reports on the public schools. His first report (1839) was pronounced by Chancellor Kent a bold and startling document, founded on the most painstaking and critical inquiry. He edited and published the Connecticut School journal. From 1843 to 1849 he had charge of the public schools of Rhode Island, where he established a model system of popular education. Dr. Barnard took great interest in the subject of school-house architecture; and from 1850 to 1854 he was State superintendent of public schools of Connecticut. In 1855 he began the publication of the American journa
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