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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 222 222 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 56 56 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 56 56 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 34 34 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 30 30 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 30 30 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 24 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for 1830 AD or search for 1830 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
Edward Livingstons, between whose parlor and ours we soon removed all obstructions; and under the same roof, Colonel Hayne Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina, born 1791; best known for his debate with Mr. Webster in the United States Senate, in 1830. and his wife, Mr. Cheves, Mr. Archer, Colonel Hamilton, General Mercer, Mr. King, Rufus King, our Minister to Great Britain in 1796; died in 1827 at the age of seventy-two. and so on. Two or three times a week, therefore, we could make an agre at Mr. Cogswell's school in Northampton, and afterwards became Professor of Latin at Harvard College, where he passed the rest of his life. Dr. Follen was made teacher of German in Mr. Ticknor's department, at the same College, in 1825, and in 1830 was made Professor of German Language and Literature, which he held for five years. In 1826 Mr. Ticknor writes to Mr. Daveis, Our German teacher, Dr. Follen, was formerly Professor of Civil Law at Basel, a young man who left his country from polit
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
ich were proposed; but the impulse was given, which, in the fifty years that have followed, has been efficient in raising the College to its present position as a University, fully equipped and admirably served, and no one did more to create it than Mr. Ticknor. His interest in the improvement of education at Cambridge was so great, and he took so large a part in the attempt to render the College effective for the promotion of the highest culture, that any account of his life from 1819 to 1830 must include a narrative of his exertions for that end. In a letter to Mr. Haven, written in 1825, he gives a sketch of the condition of the College, and of the efforts to improve it, beginning in 1821. Mr. Haven's forebodings about the College were often expressed to Mr. Ticknor. On the 15th of September, 1821, he wrote: I have frequently had occasion to express an opinion, which I have formed after some inquiry,—and, I need not add, with great reluctance,—that habits of expense and o
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
gin to feel a little relieved. . . . The Athenaeum, the College, the Hospital, Mr. Bowditch's office, He so calls the Massachusetts Hospital Life Insurance Company, which is substantially a trust company, a part of whose profits go to the uses of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Mr. Ticknor was a Director from 1827 to 1835, Vice-President from 1841 to 1862, and wrote an important Annual Report in 1857. He was a Trustee of the Massachusetts General Hospital—no sinecure — from 1826 to 1830. His connection with the Athenaeum and the Primary School Board have been mentioned. In 1821 he became a member of the corporation of the Boston Provident Institution for Savings,—the first savings-bank in New England, in founding which his father was much concerned, —and was a Trustee from 1838 to 1850. In 1831 he became a member of the Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society, whose funds go to support widows and children of deceased clergymen, of various sects, mostly, of course
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
Watertown, Brookline, or Nahant. Often they went to Portland and Gardiner; to Pepperell, the rural home of the Prescotts; to Round Hill, near Northampton, where Mr. Cogswell and Mr. Bancroft had opened a school; or to Hanover, where for some years there were still accounts to settle about the family property, with the old Quaker agent, Friend Williams. One of the farms which he inherited in New Hampshire was sold in 1825, and the rest of the property at Hanover was finally disposed of in 1830. In the summer of 1827 a journey to Niagara ended by visits on the Hudson, and is thus sketched in a letter to Mr. Daveis:— Of these journeyings you are already partly misinformed, and, as Nic Bottom would say, I will finish that matter myself. We have—as you heard—been to the Westward, but eschewed the Springs, Saratoga. not desiring fashion, but health. We had several bright spots in our journey: first, West Point, where my old friend Thayer's gallantry gave the ladies a beauti<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
. September 12.—Mr. Willis of Caius College, Cambridge, who has published on architecture, being here, and desirous to see some parts of the cathedral not usually seen, Mr. Harcourt had it opened and lighted, and a party was formed to go over it. It was very curious. We were shown, under the pavement of the present choir, the remains of the ancient choir of the church built in 1070 and burnt in 1137, together with one arch of the still older church built about A. D. 900, all discovered in 1830, when the excavations were made for the repairs of the present building, after the disastrous fire of 1829. These old ruins are of Cyclopean size, and the later portions of them are in the Norman style and very elaborate. The whole is in total darkness under the foundations of the huge minster itself, but was this morning beautifully lighted up with gas, which has been introduced for the purpose. After this we went over the choir and the other parts of the church. . . . It has more of the
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
r of State, Von Lindenau. He is a mathematician and astronomer by education and choice, and, after Baron Zach left the Observatory at Gotha, was for several years the head of it. How he came at the head of affairs in Saxony I know not; but up to 1830, and indeed for some time after that revolution, he had the Portfolio of the Interior. He is liberal in his opinions, but still, not being satisfied with the course of affairs, he resigned his place two or three years ago. This, however, created ece Augusta, daughter of the late King, who is fifty-three. The King has been twice married, but both his wives are dead, leaving no children, and Augusta was never married, so that the family of Maximilian is to succeed to the throne. . . . . In 1830 there was a revolution here in imitation of the Three Days at Paris, a Constitution was obtained with representative forms, and, Maximilian having first renounced his personal right to the crown, his eldest son — a popular favorite and very respec