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Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 12 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 11 11 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 8 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1830 AD or search for 1830 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 222 results in 192 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barton, Clara, 1830- (search)
Barton, Clara, 1830- Philanthropist; born in Oxford, Mass., in 1830; was educated in Clinton, N. Y. Her early life was devoted to teaching. In 1854 she became a clerk in the Patent Office in Washington, resigning in 1861, and undertaking the Clara Barton. nursing of sick and wounded soldiers of the army. In 1864 General Butler made her head nurse of the hospitals in the Army of the James. Later she was given charge by President Lincoln of the search organized to find missing Union sold1830; was educated in Clinton, N. Y. Her early life was devoted to teaching. In 1854 she became a clerk in the Patent Office in Washington, resigning in 1861, and undertaking the Clara Barton. nursing of sick and wounded soldiers of the army. In 1864 General Butler made her head nurse of the hospitals in the Army of the James. Later she was given charge by President Lincoln of the search organized to find missing Union soldiers, and in 1865 went to Andersonville to mark the graves of Northern soldiers who had died there. When the Franco-Prussian War broke out (1870), she assisted in preparing military hospitals, and also aided the Red Cross Society. In 1871, after the siege of Strasburg, she superintended, by request of the authorities, the distribution of work to the poor, and in 1872 performed a similar work in Paris. For her services she was decorated with the Golden Cross of Baden and the Iron Cross of Germ
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beet sugar. (search)
Beet sugar. This substitute for the product of sugar-cane was first made in 1747 in Germany by Marggraf, who discovered that excellent sugar could be obtained from the common beet. In 1830 efforts were made in the United States to establish the beet-sugar industry, but it was not until 1876 that an adequately equipped factory was erected for the purpose, in Alvarado, Cal. Since that year many similar ones have been built, mostly in the Western States, and the industry may now be said to be firmly established. Federal and State governments have greatly aided in bringing about this result through the offer of bounties on production. Beet-roots yield an average of about 10 per cent. of saccharine matter, and sugar-cane about 18 per cent. The white Slevig beet is the richest among the varieties. In manufacturing, the roots are compressed into a pulp by machinery; the pulp is put into bags, and the juice forced out by presses. After the juice has been clarified by the use of lime
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Biddle, James, 1783-1848 (search)
delphia, Pa., Feb. 29, 1783; was edueated at the University of Pennsylvania, and entered the navy, as midshipman, Feb. 12, 1800. He was wrecked in the frigate Philadelphia, off Tripoli, in October, 1803, and was a prisoner nineteen months. As first lieutenant of the Wasp, he led the boarders in the action with the Frolic, Oct. 18, 1812. Captured by the Poitiers. he was exchanged in March, 1813; and was made master commander in charge of a flotilla of gunboats in the Delaware River soon afterwards. In command of the Hornet he captured the Penguin. March 23, 1813. For this victory Congress voted him a gold medal. Made captain in February, 1815, he held important commands in different parts of the world. While in command of a squadron in the Mediterranean (1830-32), he was given a commission to negotiate a commercial treaty with the Turkish government. In 1845 he performed diplomatic service in China, and visited Japan. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 1, 1848. James Riddle.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Binney, Horace, 1780-1875 (search)
Binney, Horace, 1780-1875 Lawyer: born in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 4. 1780: was graduated at Harvard College in 1797, and was admitted to the bar in 1800. He practised law with great success until 1830, when his health became impaired and led to his retirement. Soon afterwards he was elected to Congress as a Republican. He declined a renomination. and for many years, devoted himself to writing opinions on legal questions. In 1844, by a masterly argument before the Supreme Court of the United States, on the case of Bidal vs. Girard's executors, he raise the laws governing charities out of the confusion and obseurity which previously existed. He was author of The life and character of justice Bushrod Washington; An inquiry into the formation of Washington's farewell address, and three pamphlets in support if the power claimed by President Lincoln to suspend the writ of Habeas corpus. He died in Philadlelphia. Pa., Aug. 12, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893 (search)
Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893 Statesman; born in West Brownsville, Pa., Jan. 31, 1830; was graduated at Washington College in 1847; and passed several years in teaching. In 1854 he removed to Augusta, Me., and with that State he was thereafter identified. He edited the Kennebee Journal and the Portland Advertiser, and was a member of the legislature from 1859 to 1862; in the last two years he was speaker of the House, and about the same time he became powerful in the Republican organization of the State. His service in the national House of Representatives extended from 1863 to 1876, and in the United States Senate from 1876 to 1881. Blaine was among the most aggressive of the party leaders, was a ready debater, and an expert in parliamentary law. From 1869 to 1875 he was speaker. In 1876 he was one of the chief candidates for the Presidential nomination, but he and Bristow, the leaders, were set aside for Hayes. In 1880 Grant and Blaine were the candidates respectively
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bledsoe, Albert Taylor, 1809-1877 (search)
Bledsoe, Albert Taylor, 1809-1877 Educator; born in Frankfort, Ky., Nov. 9, 1809; graduated at West Point in 1830, and served in the army about two years. when he resigned; appointed a colonel in the Confederate army in 1861, and soon made Assistant Secretary of War. In 1863 he went to England and did not return until 1866. Among his writings are Is Davis a traitor? liberty and slavery, etc. He died in Alexandria, Va., Dec. 8, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boyd, John Parker, 1764- (search)
an princes who needed their services. Their equipment, including guns and elephants, was at, his own expense. He was at one time in the pay of Holkar, in the Peishwa's service, and afterwards John Parker Boyd. in that of Nizam Ali Khan. Arriving at Madras in July, 1789, he was given, by the ruler, the command of 10,000) men. When demands for his services almost ceased, he sold out and went to Paris. In 1808 he returned to the United States, and re-entered the army as colonel of the 4th Infantry on Oct. 7 of that year. In that capacity he was distinguished in the battle at Tippecanoe (q. v.). Nov. 7 1811. Boyd was commissioned brigadier-general Aug. 26, 1812. He was in command of 1,500 men in the expedition down the St. Lawrence in 1813; and fought bravely at Chrysler's Field, in canada, Nov. 11, 1813. He led his brigade in the capture of Fort George, Upper Canada. General Boyd was appointed naval officer at the port of Boston early in 1830, and died there Oct. 4 of that year.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buchanan, Robert Christie, 1810-1878 (search)
Buchanan, Robert Christie, 1810-1878 Military officer; born in Maryland about 1810; was graduated at West Point in 1830; served in the Seminole War and the war with Mexico: and was made a lieutenant-colonel in 1861. He served in the Army of the Potomac continually during the Civil War, and was brevetted major-general United States Army in 1865. He died in Washington, D. C., Nov. 29, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carpenter, Frank Bicknell 1830- (search)
Carpenter, Frank Bicknell 1830- Painter and author; born in Homer, N. Y., in 1830; was mostly self-educated in art; settled in New York in 1851, and became an associate of the National Academy of Design in 1852. He painted numerous portraits of Presidents, statesmen, and other noted persons. His best-known works are the historical painting of President Lincoln signing the emancipation proclamation, now in the Capitol in Washington, and Arbitration, a view of the British and American commi1830; was mostly self-educated in art; settled in New York in 1851, and became an associate of the National Academy of Design in 1852. He painted numerous portraits of Presidents, statesmen, and other noted persons. His best-known works are the historical painting of President Lincoln signing the emancipation proclamation, now in the Capitol in Washington, and Arbitration, a view of the British and American commissioners on the Alabama claims in session in Washington in 1871, presented to Queen Victoria in 1892. He wrote Six months in the White House with Abraham Lincoln. He died May 23, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carr, Eugene Asa 1830- (search)
Carr, Eugene Asa 1830- Military officer; born in Concord, N. Y., March 20, 1830; was graduated at West Point in 1850. As. a member of mounted rifles, he was engaged in Indian warfare in New Mexico, Texas, and the West; and in 1861 served under Lyon, in Missouri, as colonel of Illinois cavalry. He commanded a division in the battle at Pea Ridge (q. v.), and was severely wounded. He was made a brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862. He commanded a division in the battle at Port Gibson (q. v.) and others preceding the capture of Vicksburg; also in the assaults on that place. He assisted in the capture of Little Rock, Ark., and the defences of Mobile. He was retired as brigadier-general and brevet major-general U. S. A. in 1893.
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